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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

1 Timothy 1:14

and the grace of our Lord was more than abundant, with the faith and love which are found in Christ Jesus.

Adam Clarke Commentary

The grace of our Lord was exceeding abundant - The original is very emphatic, that grace of our Lord, ὑπερεπλεονασε, hath superabounded - it manifested itself in a way of extraordinary mercy.

With faith and love - Not only pardoning such offenses, but leading me to the full experimental knowledge of Christianity; of that faith and love which are essential to it; and giving me authority to proclaim it to mankind.


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These files are public domain.

Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on 1 Timothy 1:14". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/1-timothy-1.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

And the grace of our Lord was exceeding abundant - That is, in his conversion under these circumstances and in the aid which was afterward imparted to him in his work.

With faith and love which is in Christ Jesus - Accompanied with the exercise of faith and love; or producing faith and love. The grace which was imparted to him was seen in the faith and love which it produced; see the notes, 1 Corinthians 15:10.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.

Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on 1 Timothy 1:14". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/1-timothy-1.html. 1870.

The Biblical Illustrator

1 Timothy 1:14

And the grace of our Lord.

The Saviour’s grace in its freeness and effects

I. Consider the grace of our Lord Jesus Christ. It was this that led Him to remember you in your low estate; to interpose on your behalf; to assume your nature, and to give His life a ransom for many. “Surely He hath borne our grief and carried our sorrow.” “Behold, how He loved him!” said the spectators around the grave of Lazarus, when they saw only His tears. Behold, how He loved them! was surely the exclamation of angels, when, at His cross, they beheld His blood. For was He compelled to submit to this undertaking? No. Did we deserve it? “When we were yet without strength, in due time Christ died for the ungodly.” In the application, as well as the procuring of our salvation, the grace of the Lord Jesus appears. Means were used; but they derived all their efficacy, and their very being, from Him. But whence sprang this desire? From conviction. What produced this conviction? Reflection. And what produced this reflection? A train of events. And what are events? Providence. And what is Providence? God in action; and God, acting for the welfare of the unworthy, is grace. The progress is equally from the same source. He who quickens us, when dead in trespasses and sins, renews us day by day; and enables us to hold on our way, and wax stronger and stronger. As this laid the foundation, so it will raise the superstructure; and He shall bring forth the top-stone thereof, with shoutings, crying, “Grace, grace unto it!” But, though all are saved by this grace, some individuals seem to be, in a peculiar manner, the trophies of it; and, were it necessary, we could make, even from the records of Scripture, a marvellous selection of instances. Manasseh; the dying thief; the murderers of the Son of God; the Corinthian converts.

II. This grace is eminently displayed in the conversion of Paul: “And the grace of our Lord,” says he, “was exceeding abundant.” Never did His heart pity a more undeserving wretch, or His hand undertake a more desperate case. Perhaps, you say, this made the apostle so humble. It did. But humility is not ignorance and folly. Christians are often ridiculed for speaking of themselves in depreciating terms: especially when they call themselves the vilest of the vile, or the chief of sinners. It is admitted and lamented that such language may be insufferable affectation, and is sometimes used by persons who give ample evidence of their not believing it. When show is a substitute for reality, it is generally excessive.

III. This grace is always productive of suitable influences and effects. “In faith and love,” says the apostle, “which are in Christ Jesus.”

1. Divine grace produces faith. Faith is the belief of the gospel; a firm and lively persuasion of the truth of the record that God has given of His Son, accompanied with acquiescence, dependence, and application. It will lead me to have recourse to Him for all I want.

2. Divine grace will equally produce love. To whom? To the Saviour Himself; His name, His word, His day, His service, His ways.

3. Divine grace will produce both these in the same subjects. Faith, according to the apostle’s order of statement, goes before love’; for faith precedes everything in religion--it is an original principle; it is the spring from which flow all the streams of pious temper and practice; it is the root from which grow all the fruits of Christian obedience and affection. But love follows after faith. We are told that “faith worketh by love.” And how should it be otherwise? Is it possible for me to believe the compassions of the Saviour, and to realize as my own the blessings of His death, and not feel my heart affected? and my gratitude constraining me to embrace Him, and my fellow-Christians, and my fellow-creatures, for His sake? By the latter of these, therefore, you are to evince the reality and genuineness of the former. The subject admonishes Christians. It calls upon you, like Paul, to review the grace of our Lord Jesus Christ. Remember where you were, and what you were, when He said unto you, “Live!” Look unto the rock whence ye are hewn, and to the hole of the pit whence ye are digged. This will prove the destruction of pride and ingratitude. (W. Jay.)

The exceeding abundant grace of God

It is the most difficult thing in the world for a man to speak in a becoming and consistent manner concerning himself. He speaks of himself very humbly and penitently: “Who was before a blasphemer, and a persecutor, and injurious; but I obtained mercy because I did it ignorantly in unbelief.” He speaks also most encouragingly to others: “Howbeit for this cause I obtained mercy, that in me first,” or in me principally, “Jesus Christ might show forth all long suffering for a pattern to them which should hereafter believe on Him to life everlasting.”

I. The grace of God as the only source of hope and salvation to guilty and apostate man.

1. The very terms of this proposition suppose that man is in a guilty and apostate state. The effectuation of that great scheme into which the angels desired to look, the contrivance of infinite mercy, is of grace: “Ye know the grace of our Lord Jesus Christ, who, though He was rich, yet for our sakes became poor, that we through His poverty might become rich.” The application of the Divine contrivance for man’s recovery is of grace. The Holy Spirit, the third person in the glorious Trinity, stands engaged in the economy and covenant of mercy, to “take of the things of Christ, and show them unto us.” The completion of this great and glorious work is of grace. Were we to trace the whole process from the commencement to the perfection of it, it would be seen that in every step the grace of God is manifested to be “exceeding abundant.” Now, do consider that this is the only source of hope and salvation for guilty man. Tell me of any other if you are able. Will you talk to me of penances, and pilgrimages, and bodily austerities?

II. In the circumstances attendant upon the conversion and salvation of the apostle paul, this grace was “exceeding abundant.”

1. This will appear, in the first place, if you consider his previous character. He was, before, an impious blasphemer, a treacherous persecutor, an injurious reviler. What does this prove? That where a man is not chargeable with gross immoralities, yet the sins of the mind, the intellect, the temper and disposition of the heart, may stand out in the sight of God in the most odious, the most culpable, and in the most guilty form.

2. In the second place, the grace of God was exceeding abundant towards this apostle, if you consider the period of time at which he thus became the subject of renewing and converting mercy. It was at the very moment when, with impetuous fury, he was proceeding to Damascus under the authority of the high priest to make havoc of the Church of God.

3. In the third place, the exceeding abundant grace of God was conspicuously manifest in the completeness of the change which was produced on his condition and character. It was a very remarkable change, because Paul the disciple presents a contrast so direct, so strong, and so striking, to Saul of Tarsus. Once more, the grace of God was exceeding abundant toward him if you consider the subsequent employment to which he was appointed, the eminent qualifications with which he was endowed, and the great success which attended him in his apostolic career.

III. The character to which the grace of God will always form those who are the subjects of it. “With faith and love which is in Christ Jesus.” The two grand characteristics of the apostle antecedently to his conversion, were his unbelief and his malignity. Now the character to which he was wrought by the operation of Divine grace on his heart, exhibits an entire contrast to these two characteristic qualities; for you find in him faith taking the place of unbelief, and love taking the place of malevolence; he becomes an entirely changed man, the principles of his whole conduct are completely altered. In closing this subject--

1. It offers hope to the most hopeless; I say hope to the most hopeless, because we have discovered that the grace of God is the spring and the source of man’s salvation.

2. Let us examine, pointedly and “seriously, whether we know anything of the grace of God which we have seen exemplified in so remarkable and transcendent a degree in the conversion of the apostle Paul. Has this grace reached your heart?

3. What gratitude do we owe for the manifestation of this grace, for the revelation of it to our sinful world? If the sun could be extinguished and blotted out from yonder heavens, it would be a less calamity inflicted on the natural world than if the doctrines of grace were banished from the Christian system. Let us close, therefore, by considering the animating and exhilarating prospect which the grace of God opens beyond the grave. (G. Clayton.)

Abundant grace.

Grace and its fruits are, you perceive, the two themes of the apostle’s thankfulness, as they should be the two great themes of our thankfulness.

I. Consider, in the first place, the grace of our Lord, which was “exceeding abundant.” If there was one theme on which Paul dwelt oftener, and lingered longer than others, it was this theme of Divine grace. He took pleasure in giving it prominence, and securing for it attention. It was with him a great central truth, from which other truths radiated, and towards which they again converged. It was a seminal truth, a seed out of which other truths sprang and grew. It was a foundation truth, on which he continued to build a structure of strength and holiness and beauty. In this respect, all saints are very much alike. “By grace are ye saved.” Grace is one form of Divine love. I say one form, because there are others. God loves Himself. He loves His perfect works--the high intelligencies that surround His throne. But this is a love of complacency. Grace is pity--it is love unconstrained by any governmental necessities--unmerited by any moral qualifications. It is worthy of notice that Paul characterizes the grace of God to himself as “exceeding abundant.” He adds one term to another for the purpose of expressing his sense of its freeness and fulness. This is a proper way of speaking. Nothing but grace, nothing but “exceeding abundant” grace, could have moved God to give His only begotten Son for the forgiveness of sins; nothing less than grace, “exceeding abundant” grace, could have converted and saved Isaac the son of faithful Abraham, and Samuel, for whom the devout Hannah prayed, and Solomon, brought up in the house of the man after God’s own heart, and Timothy, who had known the Scriptures from a child. However great our religious advantages, or excellent our character, or refined and elevated our tastes, the heart by nature is corrupt, and the life is bad, and nothing short of “exceeding abundant” grace can purify the former and rectify the latter. After all it comes to this, that every Christian finds in his own conversion the most illustrious manifestation of the grace of God. There is another peculiarity in Paul’s language which we must not overlook. He speaks of the grace shown in his salvation as “the grace of our Lord.” By our Lord he evidently means the Lord Jesus Christ. Elsewhere he attributes his salvation to the Father; he recognizes, also, the sovereign agency of the Holy Spirit; here he refers, in an especial manner, as in other places, to our Lord Jesus Christ. He calls himself “Paul, a servant of Jesus Christ;” he says, “I am crucified with Christ: nevertheless I live; yet not I, but Christ liveth in me: and the life which I now live in the flesh I live by the faith of the Son of God, who loved me, and gave Himself for me.” It was Christ who sent him to preach the gospel; and when in prison he was “the prisoner of Jesus Christ”; he could do all things through Christ, who strengthened him; he could say, with truth, “I count all things but loss, for the excellency of the knowledge of Christ Jesus my Lord, for whom I have suffered the loss of all things, and do count them but dung, that I may win Christ.” “For me to live is Christ.” What a comment all this is on his saying to the Corinthians, “For I am determined not to know anything among you, save Jesus Christ, and Him crucified.” The grace of our Lord, towards us and in us, has been “exceeding abundant.”

II. Now, let us consider the fruits of grace, of which Paul speaks--“Faith and love which is in Christ Jesus.” These two elements of Christian character are put, if you will look at the chapter, in opposition to the apostle’s previous character. Speaking of himself, in the preceding verse, he says, “I, who was before a blasphemer, a persecutor, and injurious, did it ignorantly in unbelief,” but now, instead of unbelief and blasphemy there is simple, yet strong faith, and instead of persecution and injury, there is ardent, self-denying love. Look at the reality and strength of the faith! It overturned all the prejudices of the mind fortified by parental example and early education. It made him bold as a lion in the advocacy of the Redeemer’s cause, before the philosophers and monarchs of the age. How ardent and consuming was this man’s love. His love to Christ led him to renounce friends and fame; it burned out the old enmity of his heart against Jesus, and filled him with a consuming zeal. It prompted him to undertake the most arduous labours, it enabled him to endure hardships by sea and land, and to brave persecution by his countrymen. It was the great secret of his life and labours. “What mean ye to weep and to break my heart? for I am ready not to be bound only, but also to die at Jerusalem for the name of the Lord Jesus.” And to this supreme love to Jesus Christ, there was united a warm affection for His followers, a tender compassion for all mankind. He loved and enkindled love. Such were the fruits of a Divine grace in the apostle Paul, and just in proportion as that grace is in our hearts, will these fruits appear in us. Like causes produce like effects. Let us try ourselves to see whether or not we are partakers of the grace of God in truth. Observe, for a moment, the order in which the apostle places these Christian virtues--faith and love. Faith first, love second. We find this order in other parts of his writings; they are not by chance here--“Faith which worketh by love.” “Let us who are of the day be sober, putting on the breastplate of faith and love.” You see how natural this order is. The sinner has, first, a believing apprehension of Christ. There can be no real love to Christ, or love to men for His sake, without faith in Him. You may admire His character, but you cannot feel that personal obligation and attachment which He demands. Burke could appreciate to some extent the philanthropic career of Howard; Pollock and Cowper could sing his praises; but how vastly different from their emotions towards the great philanthropist, was the love cherished by the prisoners whose lot he alleviated, and the distressed whose sorrows he removed. Remember this also--If you profess faith, you will show it by love. “Faith which worketh by love.” If you desire to know whether you believe in Christ, ascertain this by asking whether you love Christ. Paul mentions only faith and love as the fruits of Divine grace in Him. Not that these were the only fruits produced, but because these are the chief, and where these are found all the others will surely be found with them. The Christian virtues hang together like grapes in clusters. Where you find faith and love you will find also obedience, patience, purity, meekness, and everything that is excellent and of good report. (W. Walters.)


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Exell, Joseph S. "Commentary on "1 Timothy 1:14". The Biblical Illustrator. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tbi/1-timothy-1.html. 1905-1909. New York.

Coffman's Commentaries on the Bible

and the grace of our Lord abounded exceedingly with faith and love which is in Christ Jesus.

Which is in Christ Jesus ... indicates the theater where the grace, love and faith (all three) are available for sinners. Paul did not receive grace outside of Christ, but inside; and the faith that saves is not a faith exercised independently of the body of Christ, but "in him." The tragedy of our day is that many speak glibly of their "faith in Christ," whereas, due to the fact of their never having been baptized "into Christ," their so-called faith is "out of Christ," not "in Christ."

"The words (abounded exceedingly) occur 158 times in the New Testament, 106 of these in the Pauline letters."[32] Hendriksen classified this as another instance of Paul's "super" words, such as are in Romans 5:20; 2 Thessalonians 1:3; 2 Corinthians 7:4; 1 Thessalonians 3:10; Philippians 4:7; 2 Corinthians 12:7, etc. "It is clear that this super vocabulary is characteristic of Paul."[33]

[32] A. C. Hervey, op. cit., p. 5.

[33] W. H. Hendriksen, op. cit., p. 75.


Copyright Statement
James Burton Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.

Bibliography
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on 1 Timothy 1:14". "Coffman Commentaries on the Old and New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/1-timothy-1.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

And the grace of our Lord was exceeding abundant,.... That is, the love of Jehovah the Father; so the Ethiopic version reads, "the grace of God"; of God the Father, since he is distinguished in the text from Jesus Christ. God is abundant in grace and goodness; he is rich and plenteous in mercy; there is an overflow of love in his heart to his chosen people, and in conversion it flows out, and abounds and superabounds; see Romans 5:20.

with faith and love which is in Christ Jesus; these are the effects of the love and favour of God displayed in conversion, or which the grace of God brings along with it, and implants in the soul at that time, as it did in the apostle; for by "faith" is not meant the faithfulness of God to his Son, and to his covenant, oath, and promise, which now began visibly to be made good; nor the faith of the Gospel committed to the apostle's trust, which was an high favour; but the grace of faith, which is a pure gift of God, and a distinguishing instance of his grace; for all men have it not, only his elect; and is a most precious and excellent grace, and of great use and importance: it receives every blessing from Christ, and gives him all the glory; through it much peace, joy, and comfort are enjoyed here, and with it is connected eternal life and salvation hereafter: and by "love" also is meant, not the love with which God loves his people, for that is designed by the grace of our Lord, though there is a very great display of that in conversion, which is a time of love; but the internal grace of love, even love to God, to Christ, and to his people, which the apostle was before destitute of; but now instead of unbelief he had faith, and instead of rage and madness against Christ, and the saints, his soul was filled with love to both. The Arabic version reads, "with my faith, and my love". The phrase, "which is in Christ Jesus", denotes either that the spring of these graces is in Christ, and that they come from him, in whom all fulness dwells; or that he is the object of them, in which they centre, and on whom they are exercised, and particularly that love to the saints was shown for his sake.


Copyright Statement
The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on 1 Timothy 1:14". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/1-timothy-1.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

And the grace of our Lord was exceeding abundant 12 with faith and love which is in Christ Jesus.

(12) He proves this change by the effects, because he who was a profane man, has become a believer: and he that did most outrageously persecute Christ, burns now in love towards him.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on 1 Timothy 1:14". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/1-timothy-1.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

AndGreek, “But.” Not only so (was mercy shown me), but

the grace — by which “I obtained mercy” (1 Timothy 1:13).

was exceeding abundantGreek, “superabounded.” Where sin abounded, grace did much more abound” (Romans 5:20).

with faithaccompanied with faith, the opposite of “unbelief” (1 Timothy 1:13).

love — in contrast to “a blasphemer, persecutor, and injurious.”

which is in Christ — as its element and home [Alford]: here as its source whence it flows to us.


Copyright Statement
These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on 1 Timothy 1:14". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/1-timothy-1.html. 1871-8.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

Abounded exceedingly (υπερεπλεονασενhuperepleonasen). Aorist active indicative of the late and rare (So 1 Timothy 5:19 and in Herond.) compound υπερπλεοναζωhuperpleonazō (here alone in N.T.), in later ecclesiastical writers. The simplex πλεοναζωpleonazō Paul used in Romans 5:20; Romans 6:1 and the kindred υπερεπερισσευσενhupereperisseusen used also with η χαριςhē charis Paul is fond of compounds with υπερhuper For “faith in Christ Jesus” see note on Galatians 3:26, for “faith and love in Christ Jesus” as here, see 2 Timothy 1:13.


Copyright Statement
The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright © Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)

Bibliography
Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on 1 Timothy 1:14". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/1-timothy-1.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Vincent's Word Studies

Was exceeding abundant ( ὑπερεπλεόνασεν )

Or abounded exceedingly. N.T.oolxx. oClass. Paul is fond of compounds with ὑπὲρ , which, with a few exceptions, are found only in his writings. In the pastorals there are only three. See 1 Timothy 2:2; 2 Timothy 3:2.

With faith

For faith as treated in the Pastorals, see Introduction, and sound doctrine, 1 Timothy 1:10.


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The text of this work is public domain.

Bibliography
Vincent, Marvin R. DD. "Commentary on 1 Timothy 1:14". "Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/vnt/1-timothy-1.html. Charles Schribner's Sons. New York, USA. 1887.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

And the grace of our Lord was exceeding abundant with faith and love which is in Christ Jesus.

And the grace — Whereby I obtained mercy.

Was exceeding abundant with faith — Opposite to my preceding unbelief.

And love — Opposite to my blasphemy, persecution, and oppression.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.

Bibliography
Wesley, John. "Commentary on 1 Timothy 1:14". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/1-timothy-1.html. 1765.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

14And the grace of our Lord He again magnifies the grace of God towards himself, not only for the purpose of removing the dislike of it and testifying his gratitude, but also to employ it as a shield against the slanders of wicked men, whose whole design was to bring down his apostleship to a lower level. When he says that it abounded, and that, too, beyond measure, the statement implies that the remembrance of past transactions was effaced, and so completely swallowed up, that it was no disadvantage to him that God had formerly been gracious to good men.

With faith and love Both may be viewed as referring to God, in this sense, that God showed himself to be true, and gave a manifestation of his love in Christ, when he bestowed his grace upon him. But I prefer a more simple interpretation, that “faith and love” are indications and proofs of that grace which he had mentioned, that it might not be supposed that he boasted needlessly or without good grounds. And, indeed, “faith” is contrasted with unbelief, and “love in Christ” is contrasted with the cruelty which he had exercised towards believers; as if he had said, that God had so completely changed him, that he had become a totally different and new man. Thus from the signs and effects he celebrates in lofty terms the excellence of that grace which must obliterate the remembrance of his former life.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.

Bibliography
Calvin, John. "Commentary on 1 Timothy 1:14". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/1-timothy-1.html. 1840-57.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

14 And the grace of our Lord was exceeding abundant with faith and love which is in Christ Jesus.

Ver. 14. Was exceeding abundant] Hath abounded to flowing over, υπερεπλεονασε, as the sea doth above mole hills. "I will scatter your sins as a mist," saith God, "and they shall be cast into the midst of the sea." Note these two metaphors, and despair, if thou canst. Paul was a blasphemer (and so sinned against the first table), be was also a persecutor (and sinned against the second table), he was injurious (and so came near unto the unpardonable sin), and yet he obtained mercy; albeit his ignorance was not invincible, but of a brave disposition. Cheer up therefore and despond not. There is a pleonasm of free grace for thee in other Scriptures, as Ephesians 2:7; Romans 5:20, but here is a superpleonasm.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
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Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on 1 Timothy 1:14". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/1-timothy-1.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

1 Timothy 1:14. With faith and love When he was a bigotted Jew, he had no love to the Christians, or to the Gentiles, nor any true love to God; but love soon followed faith in Christ Jesus: the benevolent spirit of Christianity, accompanied with the power of divine grace, sweetened his temper, regenerated his soul, and altered his cond


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on 1 Timothy 1:14". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/1-timothy-1.html. 1801-1803.

Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament

Still our apostle goes on magnifying the transcendent mercy and abundant grace of God, that called him first to be a Christian, and then an apostle; and he shows, that this great mercy of God had great effects in him of faith and love, both towards God and his saints.

Where note, how St. Paul after his conversion abounded and excelled in those graces which were opposite and contrary to the sins committed in his carnal and unregenerate state: he abounds in faith, in opposition to his former unbelief; and in love, in opposition to his former rage and cruelty.

A Christian's fruitfulness in grace and holiness after his conversion, ought to bear some proportion to his unfruitfulnes in a sinful state, before conversion; the grace of our Lord was exceeding abundant with faith and love; he now glorifies God by excelling in those graces which were opposite to his former sins.


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Bibliography
Burkitt, William. "Commentary on 1 Timothy 1:14". Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wbc/1-timothy-1.html. 1700-1703.

Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary

14.] but (contrast still to his former state, and epexegetical of ἠλεήθη;—not to ἠλεήθ.,—‘not only so, but,’ as Chr., De W., al.) the grace of our Lord (His mercy shewn to me—but not in strengthening me for His work, endowing me with spiritual gifts, &c., as Chr., al.: for the ἠλεήθην is the ruling idea through the whole, and he recurs to it again 1 Timothy 1:16, never having risen above it to that of his higher gifts) superabounded (to be taken not comparatively, but superlatively, see Romans 5:20, note) with (accompanied by) faith and love (see the same pauline expression, Ephesians 6:23, and note there) which are ( τῆς probably improperly used by attraction for τῶν: there is no reason why πίστις as well as ἀγάπη should not be designated as ἐν χριστῷ ἰησοῦ) in (as their element, and, as it were, home) Christ Jesus (all these three abounded—grace, the objective side of God’s ἔλεος to him:—Christian faith and love—the contrast to his former hatred and unbelief,—God’s gifts, the subjective side. This is much better than to regard μετὰ πίστεως καὶ ἀγάπης as giving that wherein the χάρις ὑπερεπλεόνασεν):


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Bibliography
Alford, Henry. "Commentary on 1 Timothy 1:14". Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hac/1-timothy-1.html. 1863-1878.

Heinrich Meyer's Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament

1 Timothy 1:14. The last words might be so explained as to weaken seemingly the divine grace; and therefore the apostle feels bound to set forth its abundant riches.

ὑπερεπλεόνασε δὲ χάρις κ. τ. λ.] The verb ὑπερπλεονάζειν only occurs here in the N. T., and is not current in classical Greek. The simple πλεονάζειν, with the classic writers, means: “to be more, i.e. than the measure demands, therefore to go beyond the measure;” but in several passages of the N. T. it has clearly the meaning: “become more, therefore increase, grow larger.” Comp. 2 Thessalonians 1:3 (synon. with ὑπεραυξάνειν); Romans 5:20; Romans 6:1 (Meyer: accumulate); so also Philippians 4:17 and 2 Corinthians 4:15 (Meyer has there: “become abundant … increase,” and here: “be increased”). The prefix ὑπερ serves, with Paul, to strengthen the idea with which it is joined; thus ὑπεραυξάνει, 2 Thessalonians 1:3; ὑπερεκπερισσοῦ, Ephesians 3:20; ὑπερλίαν, 2 Corinthians 11:5, al. In Romans 5:20, ὑπερεπερίσσευσεν seems to mean that the ἐπλεόνασεν ἁμαρτία was surpassed by the χάρις (so Meyer; Hofmann differs). If we assume here this reference of surpassing, we cannot regard ἠλεήθην as the thing surpassed. For χάρις cannot be regarded as something surpassing ἔλεος;(66) but ὑπερ in that case would have to be referred to τὸ πρότερον ὄντα βλάσφημον κ. τ. λ. Hence the apostle’s meaning in ὑπερεπλεόνασεν would be that grace was manifested to him in abundant measure, far surpassing his enmity (so in a former edition of this commentary); but in that case ἀλλὰ ἠλεήθην κ. τ. λ. would be parenthetical. It is more correct not to assume such a reference here, but to explain ὑπερπλεονάζειν: “to go (abundantly) beyond the measure” (Plitt, van Oosterzee, Hofmann). The apostle added ὑπερεπλ. χάρις to ἠλεήθην, because the latter expression did not seem enough to his mind, which was penetrated by the unbounded greatness of the grace he had experienced. “It is as though he wrestles with speech in order to find some sufficient expression for the feeling which quite overpowers him” (van Oosterzee). The particle δέ belongs to the relation of climax existing between the two clauses, as in Hebrews 12:6; it corresponds to the English yea or aye in a climax.(67)

΄ετὰ πίστεως καὶ ἀγάπης] The preposition ΄ετά with the genitive serves to connect the fact with the points that accompany it. πίστις and ἀγάπη therefore are, properly speaking, not mentioned as results of the χάρις, but as blessings immediately connected with χάρις. They form, as de Wette says, the subjective side of the condition of grace. Leo is right, therefore, in saying: “verbis ΄ετὰ κ. τ. λ. indicatur, π. κ. ἀγ. quasi comites fuisse illius χάριτος” (so also Plitt and van Oosterzee); but he is wrong, if he means that Paul added these words to tell in what the grace was manifested as ὑπερπλεονάζουσα.

By πίστις κ. ἀγ. ἐν χρ. . we are not to understand God’s faithfulness and love in Christ, nor the apostle’s endeavour to bring others to faith and love; nor, again, is ἐν to be explained by διά or by εἰς. The words τῆς ἐν χρ. . are added to τῆς ἀγάπης, and mark the love as one “that has its ground and middle-point in Christ” (Matthies); cf. 2 Timothy 1:13. It is doubtful whether the addition is to be referred also to πίστεως (for this Matthies, Plitt, van Oosterzee; against it, Hofmann); since πίστεως does not properly require it, it might be better to limit the reference to ἀγάπης.(68) “In contrasting his former ἀπιστία with his present increasing πίστις κ. ἀγ.” (Heydenreich), Paul does not lose sight of the heresy which did not effect οἰκονο΄ία θεοῦ ἐν πίστει (1 Timothy 1:4), and had not the ἀγάπη (1 Timothy 1:5) as its goal.


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Bibliography
Meyer, Heinrich. "Commentary on 1 Timothy 1:14". Heinrich Meyer's Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hmc/1-timothy-1.html. 1832.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

1 Timothy 1:14. ὑπερεπλεόνασε δὲ, and was exceeding abundant) He explains how he obtained mercy, namely, with faith, etc. The epistles to Timothy, in a peculiar degree, breathe this ‘abundance.’— χάρις, grace) by which I obtained mercy, 1 Timothy 1:13.— κυρίου, of the Lord) Jesus.— μετὰ πίστεως, with faith) Its opposite is, in unbelief, 1 Timothy 1:13.— καὶ ἀγάπης, and love) Its opposite, as we have said, are the three, a blasphemer, a persecutor, a despiser. The words, mercy and grace (in 1 Timothy 1:13-14), correspond to each other. Unbelief and faith are opposed.


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Bibliography
Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on 1 Timothy 1:14". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/1-timothy-1.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

And the grace of our Lord was exceeding abundant; the free love of God towards me, in justifying such a guilty creature, and sanctifying such an unholy creature, and afterwards calling me to the office of an apostle, fitting me for it, and trusting me with that great work and employment, abounded beyond all measure and possibility of expression.

With faith and love which is in Christ Jesus: Christ working faith in me, enabling me to receive him as the Son of God, and my Lord and Saviour; and to love him, whom I formerly thought I ought to do much against, and his disciples, whom I formerly haled to death, of whom I made havoc, persecuting them to death. He mentions

faith and love, the two principal graces, in opposition to the reigning sins in his unconverted state: faith in the doctrine of the gospel, in opposition to his former ignorance and infidelity; and love to Christ and believers, in opposition to his former rage and cruelty against them. And these graces were from Christ, the fruits of his merit, and Holy Spirit.


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Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on 1 Timothy 1:14". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/1-timothy-1.html. 1685.

Justin Edwards' Family Bible New Testament

The grace of our Lord; in leading him to repent and believe on Christ.

With faith and love; he mentions these as the never failing attendants and fruits of God’s grace.

Which is in Christ Jesus; he adds these words to show that faith and love have their ground only in the union of the soul with Christ.


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Bibliography
Edwards, Justin. "Commentary on 1 Timothy 1:14". "Family Bible New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/fam/1-timothy-1.html. American Tract Society. 1851.

Cambridge Greek Testament for Schools and Colleges

14. ὑπερεπλεόνασεν. A rare word, not found elsewhere in N.T. or in the LXX.; it occurs in the Psalms of Solomon, 1 Timothy 5:19, and in Hermas, Mand. 1 Timothy 1:2. St Paul shews a marked inclination in all four groups of his letters for verbs compounded with ὑπέρ, e.g. ὑπεραυξάνω (2 Thessalonians 1:3); ὑπερβαίνω (1 Thessalonians 4:6); ὑπερεκτείνω (2 Corinthians 10:14), ὑπερεντυγχάνω (Romans 8:26); ὑπερνικάω (Romans 8:37); ὑπερυψόω (Philippians 2:9); ὑπερφρονέω (Romans 12:3); all of which are ἅπαξ λεγὁμενα in the N.T. Compare with the present passage ὑπερεπερίσσευσεν ἡ χάρις (Romans 5:20).

The simple title ὁ κύριος ἡμῶν, without the addition of Ἰησοῦς χριστός either before or after, is only used by St Paul here and at 2 Timothy 1:8; cp. Hebrews 7:14.

μετὰ πίστεως κ.τ.λ. Faith and love are the characteristic concomitants of the grace of our Lord. The best gifts of the grace which is from Christ are faith in Him, and love which, centred in Him, necessarily embraces all the members of that human family whose brotherhood is revealed in the Fact of the Incarnation. There is an intimate connexion between them; ἀγάπη μετἀ πίστεως is part of St Paul’s benediction at the close of the Ephesian letter (Ephesians 6:23); the breastplate ‘πίστεως καἰ ἀγάπης’ is part of the Christian panoply (1 Thessalonians 5:8); it is indeed through ‘love’ that ‘faith’ manifests itself most plainly; cp. Galatians 5:6, πίστις διʼ ἀγάπης ἐνεργουμένη. see on 1 Timothy 1:5 and Titus 2:2.


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Bibliography
"Commentary on 1 Timothy 1:14". "Cambridge Greek Testament for Schools and Colleges". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cgt/1-timothy-1.html. 1896.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

14. Grace… exceeding abundant—Or it could not have pardoned a guilt like mine.

With faith and love—The blessed response in the forgiven heart to the forgiving grace.

In Christ—And are in our hearts the overflow from him. We love him because he loved us; we are faithful to him because he is “the faithful and true.”


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Bibliography
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on 1 Timothy 1:14". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/1-timothy-1.html. 1874-1909.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

1 Timothy 1:14. Our Lord. In the earlier Epistles we have the forms ‘the Lord,’ ‘the Lord Jesus Christ,’ ‘Jesus Christ our Lord.’ The use of this shortened form belongs to St. Paul’s later language (2 Timothy 1:8).

With faith and love. ‘Grace’ came as the result of ‘mercy,’ bringing with it the new trust which contrasted with his former unbelief, the new love which replaced the bitter hatred of the persecutor. And these were not simply human feelings. They had their life, their home, ‘in Christ’


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Bibliography
Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on 1 Timothy 1:14". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/1-timothy-1.html. 1879-90.

The Expositor's Greek Testament

1 Timothy 1:14. ὑπερπλεονάζειν only occurs here in N.T.; but St. Paul constantly uses compounds with ὑπέρ. The comparative force of the ὑπέρ—grace outweighing sin—is brought out in Romans 5:15 sqq. In these passages at least it is not true, as Ellicott maintains, that ὑπέρ has a superlative (abound exceedingly) force.

τοῦ κυρίου ἡμῶν: The expression our Lord (without the addition of Jesus or Jesus Christ), common in modern times, is rare in N.T. See reff. In 2 Peter 3:15 it is not certain if the reference is to Christ, the Judge, or to the Father who determines the moment of His coming. In Revelation 11:15 God the Father is meant.

Faith and love which is in Christ Jesus occurs again in 2 Timothy 1:13. In both places the singular relative is improperly used for the plural. It is one of the writer’s habitual phrases; and therefore we cannot suppose any special relevance to the context in either of its constituent parts, though here Bengel contrasts faith with the unbelief; and love with the blasphemer, etc., of 1 Timothy 1:13. Faith and love, are the inward and outward manifestations respectively of the bestowal and realisation of grace.

πίστις ἐν χρ. ἰησ. occurs Galatians 3:26, 1 Timothy 3:13, 2 Timothy 3:15. πίστις and ἀγάπη are also associated (in this order) in the first six reff.


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Bibliography
Nicol, W. Robertson, M.A., L.L.D. "Commentary on 1 Timothy 1:14". The Expositor's Greek Testament. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/1-timothy-1.html. 1897-1910.

Mark Dunagan Commentary on the Bible

“And the grace of our Lord was more than abundant”: Even sins committed in ignorance by conscientious people need abundant grace. His ignorance did not make his sins any less sinful or any less in need of God’s grace. Compare with Romans 5:20. Grace was extended to Paul when Jesus appeared to him (Galatians 1:15), and by his faith, and his willingness to repent and be baptized, Paul entered into God’s grace (Acts 22:16; Romans 5:1-2). Even though Paul had acted in ignorance, he still had to do what everyone else needs to do to be saved (Acts 9:11; Acts 9:18; Acts 22:16).

“With the faith and love which are found in Christ Jesus”: One is not saved by grace alone, rather along with God’s grace, faith, and love on the part of Paul were also needed. “Whereas before his trip to Damascus, Paul had been a blasphemer, now he came to love Jesus Christ” (Reese p. 29). Calvinists seek to argue that faith and love are the miraculous result of God’s grace, that is, apart from God’s grace, Paul could not believe. Rather, faith is the product of hearing the gospel (Romans 10:17), and love is something that man must exercise.

“In Christ Jesus”: Jesus is now the object of Paul’s faith and love, rather than his hatred and opposition.


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Bibliography
Dunagan, Mark. "Commentary on 1 Timothy 1:14". "Mark Dunagan Commentaries on the Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dun/1-timothy-1.html. 1999-2014.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

was exceeding, &c. = abounded over all. Greek. husperpleonazo. Only here. Compare Romans 5:20.

with. App-104.

love. Same as "charity", 1 Timothy 1:5.


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Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on 1 Timothy 1:14". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/1-timothy-1.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

And the grace of our Lord was exceeding abundant with faith and love which is in Christ Jesus.

And , [ De (Greek #1161)] - 'But.' Not only was mercy shown me, but, etc.

The grace - by which 'I was had mercy upon' (1 Timothy 1:13).

Was exceeding abundant , [ huperepleonasen (Greek #5250)] - 'superabounded.' Where sin abounded, grace did much more abound (Romans 5:20)

With (accompanied with) faith - in contrast to "unbelief" (1 Timothy 1:13).

Love - in contrast to his cruelty to believers, as "a blasphemer ... persecutor, and injurious."

Which is in Christ - as its element and its source, whence it flows to us.


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Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on 1 Timothy 1:14". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/1-timothy-1.html. 1871-8.

The Bible Study New Testament

His abundant grace. The point is that God's grace outweighs Paul's sin!!! It may be that Paul's enemies (especially the circumcision party) tried to discredit and disqualify his apostleship by pointing to his great sin in trying to destroy Christ's church. Gave me the faith and love. By faith, Paul means "the understanding of the power and wisdom of God, which showed him that God does not need anyone to serve him by means of persecution and cruelty (things which are un-Godly)." By love, Paul means the frame of mind that allowed men to choose for themselves in matters of religion (as he did himself). [It is difficult, but necessary, to achieve a balance between "stopping error" and permitting "free choice."]


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Bibliography
Ice, Rhoderick D. "Commentary on 1 Timothy 1:14". "The Bible Study New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ice/1-timothy-1.html. College Press, Joplin, MO. 1974.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(14) And the grace of our Lord was exceeding abundant.—The thought of his Master’s great love to one who once reviled Him so bitterly, and who had spent his strength in trying to undo His servants’ work, seems to have pressed with overwhelming force on St. Paul, who struggled to find words which should express how deeply he felt the loving tenderness which had transformed the cruel persecutor into the favoured Apostle. The Greek word translated “was exceeding abundant” is very rare, and possesses a superlative force.

With faith and love.—He sums up the divine mercy showed to him in the three words: grace, faith, and love. Grace, the unspeakable gift of God to him; faith and love, the results of the exceeding abundant gift of grace.

Faith: not merely a childlike trust in Christ, but a belief which accepted Christ as the hope of an otherwise hopeless world; and love, which includes love to man as well as love to God, a strange contrast to his former cruelty and hatred; for, instead of blaspheming, now he believed on Him whom he once reviled, and instead of persecuting the followers of Jesus, now, in his great love for them, he spent himself. Then, overwhelmed with joy and thankfulness that he, the enemy of God, had obtained the mercy and love of God, and conscious, from his own sweet and bitter experiences, what that mercy of God bestowed on a sinner signified, he gave utterance to one of those bright watchwords of the faith, with which the Christians of the first days used to comfort and encourage one another, and which, perhaps, better than any other words, gave expression to the burning thoughts which rose up from his grateful heart.


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Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on 1 Timothy 1:14". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/1-timothy-1.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

And the grace of our Lord was exceeding abundant with faith and love which is in Christ Jesus.
the grace
Acts 15:11; Romans 16:20; 2 Corinthians 8:9; 13:14; Revelation 22:21
exceeding
Exodus 34:6; Isaiah 55:6,7; Romans 5:15-20; 1 Corinthians 15:10; Ephesians 1:7,8; 1 Peter 1:3
with
Luke 7:47-50; 1 Thessalonians 5:8; 2 Timothy 1:13; 1 John 4:10

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Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on 1 Timothy 1:14". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/1-timothy-1.html.

1 Timothy 1:14 And the grace of our Lord was exceeding abundant with faith and love which is in Christ Jesus.

His sinfulness in the former life, seems to intensify his knowledge of the grace that Christ extended to him. I have seen this in many people's lives. Those that are raised in Christian homes seldom realize the abundance of grace that God showed to each one of us. Those that were saved out of lives of sin often realize just how far down God had to reach to draw them up.

ASV "and the grace of our Lord abounded exceedingly with faith and love which is in Christ Jesus"

The grace extended to Paul was wrapped in faith and love when Paul opened his heart to the Lord. God"s love was shed upon him as He accepted the Lord and His work. I would suggest that faith refers to Christ"s trust in Paul to handle the ministry given to him.

I like the way Paul put it in Romans 5:20 b "But where sin abounded, grace did much more abound:" No matter how terrible Paul was or even if he had been twice as bad - grace would have been able to cover it!

This verse seems to speak to the thought of Paul"s view of his being saved by the Lord. The Lord extended grace and love to him when he was the likes of what he was.

I marvel many times that He choose me to do His work, any of His work much less preaching and teaching. He can take someone that thumbs their nose at Him and turn them into a usable vessel.

By way of application in relation to Paul"s comment that Christ counted him faithful to be in the ministry might I suggest something?

I believe that pastors and teachers have a stronger accountability to the Lord. God has counted them faithful and faithful they should be. Many there are of the high profile pastors that have fallen - fallen because of moral problems.

In relation to this I"d like to cause us to think about something that is currently going around. It has been reported that the church of Satan is praying that Satan will bring down Christian pastors and that is happening across the nation. I"ve seen believers that are accepting this as truth.

What do you think? Are you getting worried about going into the ministry? Are these truth to these Satan worshiping folks - are they behind pastors falling today?

1. Satan is limited in many ways, thus how can prayers to him move him to do more? 2. He is in a conflict with God. He is going all out! He can do no more, even if some pray he will? 3. He knows pastors are the place to hit and he has been doing if for generations. He isn"t hitting them harder because someone is praying to him.

The Satan worshiper may be praying for this, but I don"t think their prayers are effective, for Satan has his hands completely filled - he can do no more.

The statistics however show more and more pastors are falling into trouble (1990"s) I assume the reports are true, thus I must ask why? 1. Pastors are less spiritual than they used to be. 2. Pastors are allowing themselves into situations they should never be in. 3. Pastors are more prone to go with the world rather than with God. 4. I would assume possibly also that the schools are not preparing our men properly before they go out into the ministry. 5. The creed-o of the Baby Boomer generation is "ME" and satisfying me! Many pastors are boomers - enough said.

I think that a pastor that was an influence in our lives represents one that was found faithful by the Lord. The Lord saw fit to call them into the ministry and that they remained faithful throughout a long ministry.

When God led us off to Bible college, our first pastor in Denver was a man that had planted the church that he was in. When we arrived and started attending, he took me under his wing immediately. He would talk to me from time to time and when we were on visitation, he would take time to explain why he was visiting each person, and after the visit he would explain why he did what he did so that I could learn from his experience and wisdom.

The sad part of the story was that he resigned and moved away shortly after we arrived. We lost track of him and did not hear from or about him for many years.

While at Frontier School of the Bible, he was invited to teach our week long Bible conference. We were able to talk to him, and as he preached it was obvious that he had not changed a bit. He was the same humble man of God that had impressed me so much when we were both a lot younger.

In whatever ministry God has called you into, or might call you into in the future remember that it is God that enables, and that it is God that counts you faithful to accomplish that ministry.

I would like to present a portion of Barnes comment relating to the term ministry which we defined as servant. I would like for you to consider two items as you comprehend his comments. First I would like you to compare this definition of a minister to the modern day "minister" and also compare this definition to your own life as a servant of the Lord.

"It is indeed a work of toil, and of self-denial, and demanding many sacrifices of personal ease and comfort. It requires a man to give up his splendid prospects of worldly distinction, and of wealth and ease. It is often identified with want, and poverty, and neglect, and persecution. But it is an office so honorable, so excellent, so noble, and ennobling; it is attended with so many precious comforts here, and is so useful to the world, and it has such promises of blessedness and happiness in the world to come, that no matter what a man is required to give up in order to become a minister of the gospel, he should be thankful to Christ for putting him into the office. A minister, when he comes to die, feels that the highest favour which Heaven has conferred on him has been in turning his feet away from the paths of ambition, and the pursuits of ease or gain, and leading him to that holy work to which he has been enabled to consecrate his life." From BARNES NOTES Albert Barnes; Baker Book House; Grand Rapids; 1949; p 120


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Bibliography
Derickson, Stanley. "Commentary on 1 Timothy 1:14". "Stanley Derickson - Notes on Selected Books". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/sdn/1-timothy-1.html.

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