Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

2 Kings 14:28

Now the rest of the acts of Jeroboam and all that he did and his might, how he fought and how he recovered for Israel, Damascus and Hamath, which had belonged to Judah, are they not written in the Book of the Chronicles of the Kings of Israel?
New American Standard

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Damascus;   Hamath;   Jeroboam;   Prophecy;   Syria;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Kings;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Damascus;   Jeroboam;   Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Syria;   Easton Bible Dictionary - Jeroboam;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Damascus;   Jeroboam;   Menahem;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Book(s);   Damascus;   Hamath;   Jeroboam;   Jonah;   Kings, 1 and 2;   Lo-Debar;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Damascus;   Hamath;   Jeroboam;   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Damascus;   Hamath, Hemath;   Jeroboam (2) ;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Jeroboam;   Smith Bible Dictionary - Ha'math;   Jerobo'am;   Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Hamath;  
Encyclopedias:
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Hamath;   Israel, Kingdom of;   Jehu;   Jeroboam;   The Jewish Encyclopedia - Hamath;   Tiglath-Pileser;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

How he warred, and - recovered Damascus - We learn from 1 Chronicles 18:3-11, that David had conquered all Syria, and put garrisons in Damascus and other places, and laid all the Syrians under tribute; but this yoke they had not only shaken off, but they had conquered a considerable portion of the Israelitish territory, and added it to Syria. These latter Jeroboam now recovered; and thus the places which anciently belonged to Judah by David's conquests, and were repossessed by Syria, he now conquered, and added to Israel.

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Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on 2 Kings 14:28". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/2-kings-14.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

He recovered Damascus - Jeroboam probably gained certain advantages over Benhadad, which induced the latter to make his submission and consent to such terms as those extorted by Ahab 1 Kings 20:34.

Hamath was probably among the actual conquests of Jeroboam. It was brought so low in his reign, as to have become almost a by-word for calamity (compare Amos 6:2).

Which belonged to Judah, for Israel - i. e. these cities were recovered to Judah, i. e. to the people of God generally, through or by means of being added to Israel, i. e. to the northern kingdom.

A few further facts in the history of Jeroboam II are recorded by the prophet Amos (compare Amos 7:10, etc.).

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on 2 Kings 14:28". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/2-kings-14.html. 1870.

The Biblical Illustrator

2 Kings 14:28

Now the rest of the acts of Jeroboam.
--

Life-Re-lived

There is a moment when a man’s life is re-lived on earth. It is in that hour in which the coffin lid is shut down, just before the funeral, when earth has seen the last of him for ever. Then the whole life is, as it were, lived over again in the conversation which turns upon the memory of the departed. The history of threescore years and ten is soon recapitulated; not, of course, the innumerable incidents and acts which they contained, but the central governing principle of the whole. (F. W. Robertson.)

Record of sin

It is said that the Bank of France has an invisible studio in a gallery behind the cashiers, so that at a signal from one of them a suspected customer can instantly have his picture taken without his own knowledge. So our sins and evil deeds may be registered against us, and we ourselves altogether unconscious of the fact.

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Bibliographical Information
Exell, Joseph S. "Commentary on "2 Kings 14:28". The Biblical Illustrator. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tbi/2-kings-14.html. 1905-1909. New York.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

A SUMMARY OF THE EVIL REIGN OF JEROBOAM

"Now the rest of the acts of Jeroboam, and all that he did, and his might, how he warred, and how he recovered Damascus and Hamath, which had belonged to Judah, for Israel, are they not written in the book of the chronicles of the kings of Israel? And Jeroboam slept with his fathers, even with the kings of Israel; and Zechariah his son reigned in his stead."

This formula, repeated over and over in the records of the kings of God's people, is an effective comment upon the worthlessness of human achievements unless they are accompanied by a moral and worshipful heart. In the last analysis, what difference does it make if a man succeeds greatly in the eyes of his contemporaries but utterly fails in the sight of God?

In a sense, Jeroboam was the last chance that Israel had to straighten up their lives, reject their sinful worship of the Canaanite idols, and to get right with God. Zechariah who succeeded Jeroboam was a weak ruler, and with him the phantom reigns of the kings of Israel began. God had promised that the dynasty of Jeroboam I would last four generations. It terminated in Zechariah the fourth generation whose reign lasted six months!

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Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
Bibliographical Information
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on 2 Kings 14:28". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/2-kings-14.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Now the rest of the acts of Jeroboam, and all that he did, and his might, how he warred,.... His valiant acts and warlike exploits:

and how he recovered Damascus and Hamath, which belonged to Judah, for Israel; which cities, in the times of David and Solomon, were tributary to Judah, but afterwards fell into the hands of the Syrians, from whom Jeroboam recovered them, and annexed them to the kingdom of Israel; or, as Kimchi, though Jeroboam was king of Israel, yet, having taken them, he restored them to the king of Judah, to whom they belonged:

are they not written in the book of the chronicles of the kings of Israel? where all events of any moment were registered.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on 2 Kings 14:28". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/2-kings-14.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

Now the rest of the acts of Jeroboam, and all that he did, and his might, how he warred, and how he recovered Damascus, and n Hamath, [which belonged] to Judah, for Israel, are they not written in the book of the chronicles of the kings of Israel?

(n) Which was also called Antiochia of Syria or Riblah.
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Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on 2 Kings 14:28". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/2-kings-14.html. 1599-1645.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

2 Kings 14:28 Now the rest of the acts of Jeroboam, and all that he did, and his might, how he warred, and how he recovered Damascus, and Hamath, [which belonged] to Judah, for Israel, are they not written in the book of the chronicles of the kings of Israel?

Ver. 28. And Hamath.] Which lay near to Damascus, and fared the worse for its neighbourhood. [Zechariah 9:2]

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on 2 Kings 14:28". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/2-kings-14.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

2 Kings 14:28. How he recovered Damascus, and Hamath Some are of opinion, that when Jeroboam re-conquered these two chief cities of Syria, he restored them to the kingdom of Judah, because they belonged to it of right, and reserved to himself only a small tribute to be paid him by way of acknowledgment. This is what the original Hebrew as well as the Chaldee and Septuagint versions seem to favour; but the Syriac and Arabic translators have omitted the word Judeah, and may therefore be supposed to think, as several others do, that Jeroboam kept to himself all those places which he had recovered at his own hazard and expence.

REFLECTIONS.—Under Jeroboam and his contemporary kings of Judah, Hosea, Jonah, Amos, and Micah prophesied and wrote. When matters were hasting to ruin, then did God multiply the warnings of his word; and, though Israel and Judah despised their prophets, we have reason to bless God for their writings, which are preserved for our admonition.

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Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on 2 Kings 14:28". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/2-kings-14.html. 1801-1803.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Damascus and Hamath were cities of Syria, but were taken from the Syrians by David and Solomon, 2 Samuel 8:6 2 Chronicles 8:3, and probably by them incorporated with and added to the possessions of their own tribe, to which from that time they belonged; but afterwards they were retaken by the Syrians, and were now recovered by this Jeroboam.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on 2 Kings 14:28". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/2-kings-14.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

28.He recovered Damascus — David smote the Syrians of Damascus and made them tributary; (2 Samuel 8:6;) but in Solomon’s day Rezon established himself in Damascus and acted the part of an adversary to Israel, (1 Kings 11:23,) after which time Damascus was not recovered for Israel until the time of this Jeroboam. He brought the kingdom of Damascus, which had so long distressed both Judah and Israel, into subjection, and made it tributary to himself. Afterwards we find Syria and Israel in league against Judah. 2 Kings 15:37; 2 Kings 16:5.

Hamath, which belonged to Judah — That is, it belonged to the united kingdom under David and Solomon when the seat of empire was in Judah and Jerusalem. David’s conquests, according to 1 Chronicles 18:3, extended to Hamath, and Solomon completed the conquest of this district and built store cities there. 2 Chronicles 8:3-4. But soon afterwards it seems to have recovered its independence. Hamath was one of the oldest cities of Palestine, and is often mentioned in connexion with its northern border. See on Joshua 13:5.

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on 2 Kings 14:28". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/2-kings-14.html. 1874-1909.

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

2 Kings 14:28. And how he recovered Damascus and Hamath — These were cities of Syria, but were taken from the Syrians by David and Solomon, and probably by them incorporated with, and added to, the possessions of their own tribe, to which, from that time, they belonged: but afterward they were retaken by the Syrians, and were now recovered by this Jeroboam.

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Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on 2 Kings 14:28". Joseph Benson's Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/2-kings-14.html. 1857.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

To Juda, or "of Juda;" Judæ; (Haydock) as those strong cities had been conquered by David. The Syriac and Arabic omit this word entirely, and suppose, with many others, that Jeroboam kept possession of these cities. (Calmet) (Tirinus) --- In Israel, or "to Israel," over which he reigned. (Haydock)

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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on 2 Kings 14:28". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/2-kings-14.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

recovered Damascus, and Hamath. Both were included in Solomon"s kingdom (1 Kings 4:21). Damascus lost to Rezin (1 Kings 11:23-25). This recovery did not last long. See Amos 1:3.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on 2 Kings 14:28". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/2-kings-14.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

Now the rest of the acts of Jeroboam, and all that he did, and his might, how he warred, and how he recovered Damascus, and Hamath, which belonged to Judah, for Israel, are they not written in the book of the chronicles of the kings of Israel?

The rest of the acts of Jeroboam, and all that he did, and his might ... This is the usual formula, intimating that the chief incidents of his reign were chronicled in the national annals. But particular mention is made of "his might" [ g

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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on 2 Kings 14:28". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/2-kings-14.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(28) How he recovered Damascus, and Hamath.—Jeroboam II. was probably contemporary with Rammân-nirâri, king of Assyria (B.C. 812-783). This king has recorded his exaction of tribute from Tyre and Sidon, “the land of Omri” (i.e., Israel), Edom, and Philistia; and a siege of Damascus, followed by the submission of Mari’, its king, and the spoiling of his palace. The prostration of his enemy thus accounts for the permanent success of Jeroboam, who was himself a vassal of Assyria.

He recovered.—This verb was rendered “lie restored” in 2 Kings 14:25, and that is the meaning here.

Damascus and Hamath.—Not the entire states so named, which were powerful independent communities, but portions of their territory, which had belonged to Israel in the days of Solomon. (See Note on 2 Chronicles 8:3-4.)

Which belonged to Judah.—This is really an epithet restrictive of the phrase, “Damascus and Hamath,” the sense being, “Judœan Damascus and Hamath.” (Comp, the Note on 2 Kings 15:1.)

For Israel.—Heb., in Israel. The sense is obscure; but the particle “in” appears to refer to the re-incorporation of the Damascene and Hamathite districts with Israel. Ewald would cancel “which belonged to Judah,” and read “to Israel” (so the Syriac and Arabic. But the LXX., Vulg., and Targum support the existing text.) Others explain: He restored Damascus and Hamath to Judah (i.e., to the theocratic people) through Israel (i.e., the northern kingdom, to which the recovered districts were actually annexed). No explanation, however, is really satisfactory. It may be that by an oversight the Judæan editor wrote” to Judah, “instead of” to Israel and that some scribe added a marginal note “in Israel,” which afterwards crept into the text. It is curious to find certain districts of Hamath leagued with Azariah, king of Judah, against Tiglath Pileser. (See Note on 2 Kings 15:1.)

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on 2 Kings 14:28". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/2-kings-14.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Now the rest of the acts of Jeroboam, and all that he did, and his might, how he warred, and how he recovered Damascus, and Hamath, which belonged to Judah, for Israel, are they not written in the book of the chronicles of the kings of Israel?
the rest
Damascus
2 Samuel 8:6; 1 Kings 11:24; 1 Chronicles 18:5,6; 2 Chronicles 8:3,4
which belonged to Judah
These places belonged to Judah by David's conquest, (2 Sa 3:11,) but had been repossessed by the Syrians.
Reciprocal: 2 Kings 13:13 - Jeroboam;  2 Kings 15:11 - General1 Chronicles 5:17 - Jeroboam;  1 Chronicles 29:30 - his might

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Bibliographical Information
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on 2 Kings 14:28". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/2-kings-14.html.