Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

2 Kings 22:19

because your heart was tender and you humbled yourself before the Lord when you heard what I spoke against this place and against its inhabitants that they should become a desolation and a curse, and you have torn your clothes and wept before Me, I truly have heard you," declares the Lord .
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Afflictions and Adversities;   Asahiah;   Death;   Heart;   Huldah;   Josiah;   Mourning;   Penitent;   Rending;   Repentance;   Women;   Thompson Chain Reference - Conviction of Sin;   Penitence-Impenitence;   Repentance;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Afflictions Made Beneficial;   Heart, Character of the Renewed;   Kings;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Huldah;   Josiah;   Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Prophecy, prophet;   Zephaniah;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Kings, First and Second, Theology of;   Woman;   Easton Bible Dictionary - Huldah;   Isaiah;   Josiah;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Jehoiakim;   Josiah;   Pentateuch;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Ahikam;   Excommunication;   Humility;   Jeremiah;   Josiah;   Kings, 1 and 2;   Prophetess;   Zephaniah, Book of;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Canon of the Old Testament;   Deuteronomy;   Gedaliah;   Hexateuch;   Hilkiah;   Huldah;   Idolatry;   Israel;   Jerusalem;   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Ahikam ;   Josiah ;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Josiah;   Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Urim and Thummim;  
Encyclopedias:
Condensed Biblical Cyclopedia - Kingdom of Judah;   International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Canon of the Old Testament;   Huldah;   Jehoiakim;   Tender;   Text of the Old Testament;  
Devotionals:
Faith's Checkbook - Devotion for April 3;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

Because thine heart was tender - Because thou hast feared the Lord, and trembled at his word and hast wept before me, I have heard thee, so far that these evils shall not come upon the land in thy lifetime.

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Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on 2 Kings 22:19". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/2-kings-22.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

See the marginal references.

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on 2 Kings 22:19". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/2-kings-22.html. 1870.

The Biblical Illustrator

2 Kings 22:19

Because thine heart was tender, and thou hast humbled thyself before the Lord.

The tender heart

I. The circumstances in which such a character may be placed and tried.

1. It may often have to contend with great difficulties. Observe the illustration of this in the history before us.

2. It may sometimes be surrounded by external difficulties.

3. A tender heart may sometimes misunderstand, and therefore misinterpret, the follies and frailties of other Christians. There must be the knowledge of evil as well as of good in the Christian as in the common life. Stumbling-blocks will be found, though deeply to be deplored, in every section of the Christian Church.

II. Some of the indications of a tender heart. All life reveals itself. The tiniest herb or flower that drinks the morning dew reveals itself. Life cannot be hid, and that because it is life. Not always in the same manner, but always in some manner; for as external life is full of variety, from the “cedar of Lebanon to the hyssop that groweth on the wall,” so inward religious life has its manifold phases, full of variety, full of beauty, and all significant of their Divine origin. Let us notice some--

1. There will be thoughtful interest in religious truth. We cannot conceive of the commencement, much less of the continuation, of a religious life in connection with thoughtlessness.

2. There will be practical co-operation in works of religious activity. Religious life has ever holy work to do, as holy words to say. The commencement of this new life starts with the question, “Lord, what wilt thou have me to do?”

3. There will be devout interest in religious assemblies. The object of Christian assemblies is one--the worship of God and the edification of the Church. In proportion as our heart is penetrated with the ideas proper to, and regulated by the principles of, the Christian life, there will not only be the desire but the determination to avail ourselves of seasons of religious worship for purposes of spiritual improvement.

4. There will be also personal determination to secure religious progress. First the blade, but afterwards, if the blade is healthy, there will be the ear: lovely is the blade in all its tenderness and vigour, so in its season is the maturing ear, that gives promise of the fully ripened and perfectly developed corn in the ear.

III. The blessedness of having a tender heart. Because,

1. It is the disposition produced by the influences of God’s Spirit. It is God” who worketh in us both to will and to do.” “Every good and perfect gift cometh down from above”

2. Because it will prevent great irregularity if not sinfulness of life. Religion subtracts nothing from the real enjoyment of life. The happiest transaction of life is the hour of consecration to God.

3. Because a tender heart is the sure sign of a regenerate one. “And whom He did,” etc. (Romans 8:29.) (W. G. Barrett.)

Humility the grace of graces

“I was always exceedingly pleased with that saying of Chrysostom,” says Calvin, “‘The foundation of our philosophy is humility.’ And yet more pleased with that of Augustine. ‘As,’ says he, ‘the rhetorican being asked was what the first thing in the rules of eloquence, he answered, Pronunciation. What was the second, Pronunciation. What was the third, still he answered, Pronunciation So if you ask me concerning the graces of the Christian character, I would answer, firstly, secondly, and thirdly, and for ever, humility.’” And thus it is that God sets open His school for teaching us humility every day. Humility is the grace of graces for us sinners to learn. There is nothing again like it, and we must have a continual training and exercise in it. You learn to pronounce by your clients complaining that they cannot hear you, and that they must carry their cases to another advocate unless you learn to speak better. And, as you must either please your patrons or die of starvation, you put pebbles in your month and you go out to recite by yourself by the riverside till your rhetoric is fit for a Greek judge and jury to sit and hear. And so with humility, which is harder to learn than the best Greek accent. You must go to all the schools, and put yourself under all the disciplines that the great experts practise, if you would put on this humility. And the schools of God to which He puts His great saints are such as these. You will be set second to other men every day. Other men will be put over your head everyday. Rude men will ride roughshod over your head every day. God will set His rudest men, of whom He has whole armies, upon you every day to judge you, and to find fault with you, and to correct you, and to blame you, and to take their business away from you to a better--to a better than you can ever be with all the pebbles that ever river rolled. Ay, He will take you in hand Himself, and He will set you and will keep you in a low place. (Alex. Whyte, D. D.)

Humbleness the work of true Christian

John Newton wrote a book about grace in the blade, and grace in the ear, and grace in the full corn in the ear. A very talkative body said to him, “I have been reading your valuable book, Mr. Newton; it is a splendid work; and when I came to that part, ‘the full corn in the ear’ I thought how wonderfully you had described me.” “Oh,” replied Mr. Newton, “but you could not have read the book rightly, for it is one of the marks of the full corn in the ear, that it hangs its head very low.” (C. H. Spurgeon.)

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Bibliographical Information
Exell, Joseph S. "Commentary on "2 Kings 22:19". The Biblical Illustrator. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tbi/2-kings-22.html. 1905-1909. New York.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Because thine heart was tender,.... Soft like wax, and susceptible of impressions; or was "moved", or "trembled", as the Targum; for God has respect to such as are of contrite hearts, and tremble at his word, Isaiah 66:2,

and thou hast humbled thyself before the Lord; external humiliation, such as in Ahab, was regarded by the Lord, much more internal and cordial humiliation is regarded by him, see 1 Kings 21:29,

when thou heardest what I spake against this place, and against the inhabitants thereof, that they should become a desolation and a curse; as in Leviticus 26:1.

and hast rent thy clothes, and wept before me; as expressive of the inward contrition, sorrow, and grief of his heart:

I also have heard thee, saith the Lord: his cries and prayers.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on 2 Kings 22:19". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/2-kings-22.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

Because thine heart was i tender, and thou hast humbled thyself before the LORD, when thou heardest what I spake against this place, and against the inhabitants thereof, that they should become a desolation and a curse, and hast rent thy clothes, and wept before me; I also have heard [thee], saith the LORD.

(i) Meaning, that he repented as they that do not repent are said to harden their heart, (Psalm 95:8).
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Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on 2 Kings 22:19". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/2-kings-22.html. 1599-1645.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

Because thine heart was tender, and thou hast humbled thyself before the LORD, when thou heardest what I spake against this place, and against the inhabitants thereof, that they should become a desolation and a curse, and hast rent thy clothes, and wept before me; I also have heard thee, saith the LORD.

Tender — He trembled at God's word. He was grieved for the dishonour done to God by the sins of his people. He was afraid of the judgments of God, which he saw coming on Jerusalem. This is tenderness of heart.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
Bibliographical Information
Wesley, John. "Commentary on 2 Kings 22:19". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/2-kings-22.html. 1765.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

2 Kings 22:19 Because thine heart was tender, and thou hast humbled thyself before the LORD, when thou heardest what I spake against this place, and against the inhabitants thereof, that they should become a desolation and a curse, and hast rent thy clothes, and wept before me; I also have heard [thee], saith the LORD.

Ver. 19. Because thine heart was tender.] How happy a thing is it, saith a reverend man, to be a reed unto God’s judgments, rather than an oak! The meek and gentle reed stoops, and therefore stands. The oak stands stiffly out against the strongest gust, and therefore is turned up by the roots.

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on 2 Kings 22:19". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/2-kings-22.html. 1865-1868.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

19.Thine heart was tender — Yielding and impressible.

A desolation and a curse — These words indicate that Leviticus 26 (compare especially Leviticus 22:31-32) had also been read before the king.

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on 2 Kings 22:19". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/2-kings-22.html. 1874-1909.

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

2 Kings 22:19. Because thy heart was tender — Here are four tokens of true repentance and conversion to God in Josiah: 1st, Tenderness, or softness of heart, in opposition to that hardness which arises from unbelief of God’s declarations and threatenings: he trembled at God’s word: he was grieved for the dishonour done to God by the sins of the people: and he was afraid of the judgments of God, which he saw coming on Jerusalem. This is tenderness of heart; and proceeded in Josiah from his faith in God’s word. 2d, Great humility: he abased himself before the divine majesty, conscious of his own sinfulness and guilt before God, and unworthiness of the goodness God had shown him. These two qualities were internal. The two others were outward tokens of this inward sense of things; namely, rending his clothes, and weeping before God, for his own and the public offences, followed by all possible endeavours to effect a reformation in the people.

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Bibliographical Information
Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on 2 Kings 22:19". Joseph Benson's Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/2-kings-22.html. 1857.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

Because = In that.

a desolation and a curse. These words are from Deuteronomy 11:26; Deuteronomy 28:15-19; Deuteronomy 29:19; Deuteronomy 30:1. Compare Jeremiah 44:22.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on 2 Kings 22:19". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/2-kings-22.html. 1909-1922.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(19) Tender.—See 1 Chronicles 29:1; 1 Chronicles 13:7; Deuteronomy 20:8.

Hast humbled thyself.—Comp. the behaviour of Ahab (1 Kings 21:27 seq.).

Become a desolation and a curse.—See Jeremiah 44:22. “A curse” is not so much an instance of causa pro effectu (Thenius), as a specification of the type such as would be made in blessing and cursing. (Comp. Jeremiah 29:22; Genesis 48:20; Ruth 4:11-12.)

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on 2 Kings 22:19". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/2-kings-22.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Because thine heart was tender, and thou hast humbled thyself before the LORD, when thou heardest what I spake against this place, and against the inhabitants thereof, that they should become a desolation and a curse, and hast rent thy clothes, and wept before me; I also have heard thee, saith the LORD.
thine heart
1 Samuel 24:5; Psalms 51:17; 119:120; Isaiah 46:12; 57:15; 66:2,5; Jeremiah 36:24; Jeremiah 36:29-32; Ezekiel 9:4; Romans 2:4,5; James 4:6-10
humbled
Exodus 10:3; Leviticus 26:40,41; 1 Kings 21:29; 2 Chronicles 33:12,19,23; Micah 6:8; 1 Peter 5:5,6
a desolation
Leviticus 26:31,32; Deuteronomy 29:23; Jeremiah 26:6; 44:22
hast rent
wept
Numbers 25:6; Judges 2:4,5; 20:26; Ezra 9:3,4; 10:1; Nehemiah 1:4; 8:9; Psalms 119:136; Jeremiah 9:1; 13:17; 14:17; Luke 19:41; Romans 9:2,3
I also have
19:20; 20:5
Reciprocal: 1 Kings 11:12 - in thy days;  2 Kings 18:37 - with their clothes rent;  2 Kings 22:11 - that he rent;  2 Chronicles 34:19 - that he rent;  2 Chronicles 34:27 - thine heart;  Psalm 34:18 - such as;  Psalm 119:161 - my heart;  Jeremiah 23:9 - heart;  Jeremiah 25:18 - to make;  Jeremiah 36:13 - GeneralJeremiah 44:10 - humbled;  Ezekiel 11:19 - I will put;  Joel 2:13 - rend;  Zechariah 1:2 - Lord;  Acts 24:25 - Felix;  1 Corinthians 5:2 - mourned;  Galatians 3:13 - being

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on 2 Kings 22:19". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/2-kings-22.html.

Commentary by J.C.Philpot on select texts of the Bible

2 Kings 22:19

"Because your heart was tender and you humbled yourself before the Lord when you heard what I have spoken against this place and its people, that they would become accursed and laid waste, and because you tore your robes and wept in my presence, I have heard you, declares the Lord." 2 Kings 22:19

This tenderness of heart was a mark in Josiah, on which the Lord, so to speak, put his finger; it was a special token for good which God selected from all the rest, as a testimony in his favor. The heart is always tender which God has touched with his finger; this tenderness being the fruit of the impression of the Lord"s hand upon the conscience. You may know the difference between a natural conscience and a heart tender in God"s fear by this—that the natural conscience is always superstitious and uncertain; as the Lord says, it "strains out a gnat, and swallows a camel." It is exceedingly observant of self-inflicted austerities, and very fearful of breaking through self-imposed rules; and while it will commit sin which a man who has the fear of God in his heart would not do for the world—it will stumble at mere unimportant trifles at which an enlightened soul would not feel the least scruple.

But here is the mark of a heart tender in God"s fear—it moves as God the Spirit works upon it. It is like the mariner"s compass, which having been once touched by the magnet, always turns toward the north; it may indeed oscillate and tremble backwards and forwards, but still it will return to the pole, and ultimately remain fixed at the point whence it was temporarily disturbed. So when the heart has been touched by the Spirit, and has been made tender in God"s fear, it may for a time waver to the right hand or to the left, but it is always trembling and fluctuating until it points towards God, as the only and eternal center of its happiness and holiness.

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Bibliographical Information
Philpot, Joseph Charles. "Commentary on 2 Kings 22:19". Commentary by J.C.Philpot on select texts of the Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jcp/2-kings-22.html.