Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

2 Kings 24:14

Then he led away into exile all Jerusalem and all the captains and all the mighty men of valor, ten thousand captives, and all the craftsmen and the smiths. None remained except the poorest people of the land.
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Babylon;   Captivity;   Israel, Prophecies Concerning;   Jehoiachin;   Jerusalem;   Prophecy;   Smith;   Thompson Chain Reference - Arts and Crafts;   Blacksmiths;   Captivity of Israel and Judah;   Israel;   Israel-The Jews;   Jews;   Judah, Captivity of;   Smiths;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Babylon;   Kings;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Egypt;   Jehoiachin;   Nebuchadnezzar;   Smith;   Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Babylon;   Jehoiachin;   Jeremiah;   Judah, tribe and kingdom;   Zedekiah;   Easton Bible Dictionary - Ezekiel;   Jehoiachin;   Jerusalem;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Captivity;   Jehoiachin;   Kings, the Books of;   Nebuchadnezzar;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Exile;   Ezekiel;   Ironsmith;   Kings, 1 and 2;   Mesopotamia;   People of the Land;   Zerubbabel;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Arts and Crafts;   Dispersion;   Israel;   Jeremiah;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Am Ha'arez ;   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Artificer;   Babylon ;   Captivity;   Craftsman;   Jehoiachin ;   Smith;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Jehoiachin;   Nebuchadnezzar;  
Encyclopedias:
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Captivity;   Dispersion, the;   Jehoiachin;   Prince;   Siege;   The Jewish Encyclopedia - 'Am Ha-Areẓ;   Captivity;   Jerusalem;   Mordecai;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

He carried away all Jerusalem - That is, all the chief men, the nobles, and artificers. Among these there were of mighty men seven thousand; of craftsmen and smiths, one thousand.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Bibliographical Information
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on 2 Kings 24:14". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/2-kings-24.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

The entire number of the captives was not more than 11,000. They consisted of three classes:

(1) the “princes” or “mighty of the land,” i. e., courtiers, priests, elders, and all who had any position or dignity - in number 3,000 (compare 2 Kings 24:14, 2 Kings 24:16).

(2) the “mighty men of valor” or “men of might,” i. e., the soldier class, who were 7,000. And

(3) craftsmen or artisans, who numbered 1,000. The word here translated “craftsmen” denotes artisans in stone, wood, or metal, and thus includes our “masons, carpenters, and smiths.” The word translated “smiths” means strictly “lock-smiths.”

The object of carrying off these persons was twofold:

(1) it deprived the conquered city of those artisans who were of most service in war; and

(2) it gave the conqueror a number of valuable assistants in the construction of his buildings and other great works.

The Assyrian monarchs frequently record their removal of the skilled artisans from a conquered country. The population of the ancient city has been calculated, from its area, at 15,000. The remnant left was therefore about 5000 or 6,000.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Bibliographical Information
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on 2 Kings 24:14". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/2-kings-24.html. 1870.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

And he carried away all Jerusalem,.... The inhabitants of it; not every individual of them, but the chief of them, the more honourable, rich, and useful; for the poorer sort were left, as afterwards expressed:

and all the princes, and all the mighty men of valour, even ten thousand captives; which was the number of them in the whole; the particulars are after delivered:

and all the craftsmen and smiths; besides the nobles and the soldiers, he took all the artificers that exercised any handicraft trade or business; carpenters and blacksmiths, as some interpret these two words; so that there were none left to make arms for them; the last word may be rendered "enclosers", and are by some interpreted of enclosers of jewels in metals, as gold and silver:

none remained, save the poorest sort of the people of the land; who were left to till it, and to dress the vines; see 2 Kings 25:12.

Copyright Statement
The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on 2 Kings 24:14". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/2-kings-24.html. 1999.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

And he carried away all Jerusalem, and all the princes, and all the mighty men of valour, even ten thousand captives, and all the craftsmen and smiths: none remained, save the poorest sort of the people of the land.

All — Not simply all, but the best and most considerable part, as the following words explain it.

Captives — Which are more particularly reckoned up, verse16, where there are seven thousand mighty men, and a thousand smiths; and those mentioned verse15, make up the other two thousand.

Craftsmen and smiths — Who might furnish them with new arms, and thereby give him fresh trouble.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
Bibliographical Information
Wesley, John. "Commentary on 2 Kings 24:14". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/2-kings-24.html. 1765.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

2 Kings 24:14 And he carried away all Jerusalem, and all the princes, and all the mighty men of valour, [even] ten thousand captives, and all the craftsmen and smiths: none remained, save the poorest sort of the people of the land.

Ver. 14. And he carried away all Jerusalem,] i.e., The greater and better part of the people: among the rest, Mordecai the Benjamite the son of Jair, [Esther 2:5-6] and Ezekiel the priest, the son of Buzi, [Ezekiel 1:2-3] who therefore calls it his "captivity" or deportation. [Ezekiel 40:1]

And all the craftsmen and smiths.] The like craft useth the devil, when he endeavoureth to take out of the way such as are zealous and active, valiant for God’s truth, and violent for his kingdom. (a)

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Trapp, John. "Commentary on 2 Kings 24:14". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/2-kings-24.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

2 Kings 24:14. And he carried away all Jerusalem Among these were Ezekiel the prophet, and Mordecai the uncle of Esther.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on 2 Kings 24:14". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/2-kings-24.html. 1801-1803.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

All Jerusalem, i.e. the inhabitants of Jerusalem; not simply all, but the best and most considerable part, as the following words explain and restrain it.

Ten thousand captives; which are more particularly reckoned up, 2 Kings 24:16, where there are seven thousand mighty men, and a thousand smiths; and those mentioned 2 Kings 24:15 make up the other two thousand.

All the craftsmen and smiths; which might furnish them with new arms, and thereby give him fresh trouble.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on 2 Kings 24:14". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/2-kings-24.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

14.Ten thousand captives — According to Jeremiah 52:28, they numbered three thousand and twenty-three. See note on 2 Kings 25:21. Numerically this must have been only a small part of the entire Jewish population, which in David’s time numbered five hundred thousand warriors, so that the poorest sort of the people, from whom rebellion and trouble were not expected, were more than the captives; but these latter were the might and flower of the nation, and might, therefore, well be called all Jerusalem. The mass of those left were people of the land, country people, dwelling outside of Jerusalem; and no doubt by reason of the numerous wars this part of the population had become greatly diminished since the time of David. The craftsmen and smiths would be especially serviceable to Nebuchadnezzar on the great works which he contemplated at his capital.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on 2 Kings 24:14". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/2-kings-24.html. 1874-1909.

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

2 Kings 24:14. He carried away all Jerusalem — That is, the inhabitants of Jerusalem; not simply all, but the best and most considerable part, as the following words explain and restrain it. Even ten thousand captives — Which are more particularly reckoned up 2 Kings 24:16, where there are seven thousand mighty men, and a thousand smiths; and those mentioned 2 Kings 24:15 make up the other two thousand. Craftsmen and smiths — Who might furnish them with new arms, and thereby give him fresh trouble.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on 2 Kings 24:14". Joseph Benson's Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/2-kings-24.html. 1857.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

All; the chief men, chap. xxv. 18. Ezechiel and Mardocheus were in the number. --- Engraver. The first term means a workman in wood, stone, &c.; the latter seems to designate a mason, smith, or garrison-soldier; (Calmet) or one expert in making camps; (Sa) an engineer. (Tirinus) --- St. Jerome explains it of one who enchases jewels in gold. (Menochius) --- Hecateus and Demetrius (ap. Jos.[Josephus?] and Clement of Alexandria) mention this transportation. (Du Hamel)

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on 2 Kings 24:14". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/2-kings-24.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

carried away. This deportation was eleven years before that of Zedekiah (2 Kings 25:18). Mordecai was in this deportation. See note on 2 Chronicles 36:6. The Captivity begun in 489.

craftsmen = artificers.

the People of the land. Compare 2 Kings 23:6.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on 2 Kings 24:14". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/2-kings-24.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

And he carried away all Jerusalem, and all the princes, and all the mighty men of valour, even ten thousand captives, and all the craftsmen and smiths: none remained, save the poorest sort of the people of the land.

All the craftsmen and smiths, [ kaal (Hebrew #3605) hechaaraash (Hebrew #2796) w

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on 2 Kings 24:14". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/2-kings-24.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(14) All Jerusalem.—Limited by what follows, and meaning the most important part of the population.

The princes—i.e., the nobles, e.g., the grandees of the court, some of the priests (Ezekiel 1:1), and the heads of the clans.

The mighty men of valour.—This is probably right. Thenius and Bähr prefer to understand the men of property and the artisans, as in 2 Kings 15:20.

All the craftsmen and smiths.—The former were workers in wood, stone, and metal, i.e., carpenters, masons, and smiths. (Comp. Genesis 4:22.) The “smiths” (properly, “they who shut”) answer to what we should call locksmiths. They were makers of bolts and bars for doors and gates (Jeremiah 24:1; Jeremiah 29:2). It is obvious that by deporting “the craftsmen and smiths” the king of Babylon made further outbreaks impossible (comp. 1 Samuel 13:19.) Kimchi’s explanation of “smiths” is a curiosity of exegesis. He makes of them “learned persons, who shut other people’s mouths, and propose riddles which nobody else can guess.” Hitzig and Thenius derive the word (masgçr) from mas, “levy,” and gçr, “alien,” so that it would originally mean “statute labourers,” “Canaanites compelled to work for the king;” and afterwards, as here, “manual labourers” in general. But such a compound term in Hebrew would be very surprising.

The poorest sort.—Those who had neither property nor handicraft. (Comp. Jeremiah 39:10.)

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on 2 Kings 24:14". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/2-kings-24.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

And he carried away all Jerusalem, and all the princes, and all the mighty men of valour, even ten thousand captives, and all the craftsmen and smiths: none remained, save the poorest sort of the people of the land.
all
That is, all the chief men, the nobles, and the artificers. Among these were 7,000 mighty men, and 1,000 craftsmen and smiths.
Jerusalem
2 Chronicles 36:9,10; Jeremiah 24:1-5; 52:28; Ezekiel 1:1,2
craftsmen
So
1 Samuel 23:19-22
the poorest sort
25:12; Jeremiah 39:10; 40:7; 52:16; Ezekiel 17:14
Reciprocal: Deuteronomy 28:41 - thou shalt not enjoy them;  Deuteronomy 28:43 - GeneralDeuteronomy 28:62 - few in number;  1 Samuel 13:19 - there was no;  2 Kings 18:32 - 1come;  1 Chronicles 4:14 - Charashim;  Ezra 2:1 - whom Nebuchadnezzar;  Nehemiah 7:6 - whom Nebuchadnezzar;  Esther 2:6 - Jeconiah;  Proverbs 13:8 - the poor;  Isaiah 3:2 - mighty;  Jeremiah 27:20 - when;  Lamentations 1:3 - gone;  Lamentations 1:15 - trodden;  Ezekiel 19:12 - strong;  Matthew 1:11 - about

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on 2 Kings 24:14". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/2-kings-24.html.