Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

2 Kings 24:20

For through the anger of the Lord this came about in Jerusalem and Judah until He cast them out from His presence. And Zedekiah rebelled against the king of Babylon.
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Israel, Prophecies Concerning;   Sin;   Zedekiah;   Thompson Chain Reference - Revolts;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Babylon;   Kings;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Egypt;   Jeremiah, the Book of;   Nebuchadnezzar;   Zedekiah;   Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Babylon;   Egypt;   Jeremiah;   Zedekiah;   Easton Bible Dictionary - Kings, the Books of;   Zedekiah;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Exile;   Isaiah;   Kings, 1 and 2;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Israel;   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Babylon ;   Zedekiah ;   Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Zedekiah;  
Encyclopedias:
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Captivity;   The Jewish Encyclopedia - Oath;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

Zedekiah rebelled - This was in the eighth year of his reign: and he is strongly reproved for having violated the oath he took to the king of Babylon: see 2 Chronicles 36:13. This was the filling up of the measure of iniquity; and now the wrath of God descends upon this devoted king, city, and people, to the uttermost. See the catastrophe in the next chapter.

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Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on 2 Kings 24:20". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/2-kings-24.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

It came to pass - Some prefer “came this to pass:” in the sense. “Through the anger of the Lord was it that another had king ruled in Jerusalem and in Judah:” concluding the chapter with the word “presence;” and beginning the next chapter with the words, “And Zedekiah rebelled against the king of Babylon.”

Rebelled - The Book of Jeremiah explains the causes of rebellion. In Zedekiah‘s early years there was an impression, both at Jerusalem Jeremiah 28:1-11 and at Babylon Jeremiah 29:3, and a personal visit Jeremiah 51:59, Zedekiah strove hard to obtain the restoration of the captives and the holy vessels. But he found Nebuchadnezzar obdurate. Zedekiah returned to his own country greatly angered against his suzerain, and immediately proceeded to plot a rebellion. He sought the alliance of the kings of Tyre, Sidon, Moab, Ammon, and Edom Jeremiah 27:3, and made overtures to Hophra, in Egypt, which were favorable received Ezekiel 17:15, whereupon he openly revolted, apparently in his ninth year, 588 B.C. Tyre, it must be remembered, was all this time defying the power of Nebuchadnezzar, and thus setting an example of successful revolt very encouraging to the neighboring states. Nebuchadnezzar, while constantly maintaining an army in Syria, and continuing year after year his attempts to reduce Tyre (compare Ezekiel 29:18) was, it would seem, too much occupied with other matters, such, probably, as the reduction of Susiana Jeremiah 49:34-38, to devote more than a small share of his attention to his extreme western frontier. In that same year, however (588 B.C.), the new attitude taken by Egypt induced him to direct to that quarter the main force of the Empire, and to take the field in person.

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on 2 Kings 24:20". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/2-kings-24.html. 1870.

Geneva Study Bible

For through the anger of the LORD it came to pass in Jerusalem and Judah, until he had cast them out from his f presence, that Zedekiah rebelled against the king of Babylon.

(f) Out of Jerusalem and Judah into Babylon.
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Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on 2 Kings 24:20". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/2-kings-24.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

he cast them out from his presence — that is, in the course of God‘s righteous providence, his policy as king would prove ruinous to his country.

Zedekiah rebelled against the king of Babylon — instigated by ambassadors from the neighboring states who came to congratulate him on his ascension to the throne (compare Jeremiah 17:3, with Jeremiah 28:1), and at the same time get him to join them in a common league to throw off the Assyrian yoke. Though warned by Jeremiah against this step, the infatuated and perjured (Ezekiel 17:13) Zedekiah persisted in his revolt.

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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on 2 Kings 24:20". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/2-kings-24.html. 1871-8.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

For through the anger of the LORD it came to pass in Jerusalem and Judah, until he had cast them out from his presence, that Zedekiah rebelled against the king of Babylon.

Came to pass — Thus the peoples sins were the true cause why God gave them wicked kings, whom he suffered to do wickedly, that they might bring the long-deserved, and threatened punishments upon themselves and their people.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
Bibliographical Information
Wesley, John. "Commentary on 2 Kings 24:20". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/2-kings-24.html. 1765.

Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary

REFLECTIONS

WHAT an awful representation is made in this chapter, and, indeed, in the whole history; (for all the world is but one and the same volume) of sinners! Could one suppose it possible, was it not ascertained by fact, that men should brave the divine power, and, as it were, defy the Lord by the most determined perseverance in sin. See, my soul, in the destruction of Jerusalem, the sure and inevitable consequence! The wages of sin is, and must be, death, Oh! Lord Jesus, cause me, in the view of it, to flee to thee for refuge, and let me hear thy voice saying, Oh! Israel! thou halt destroyed thyself, but in me is thy help found.

Reader, behold Jerusalem thus ruined! see the people carried away captives. See how the Lord permitted the very heathens of the earth to scourge his people! Who, after this, will take confidence while in sin. O Lord! be gracious to thy land. For Jesus sake be not wroth very sore, neither do thou remember our iniquities forever; but be jealous for thy land, and heal her backslidings, we beseech thee.

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Hawker, Robert, D.D. "Commentary on 2 Kings 24:20". "Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pmc/2-kings-24.html. 1828.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

2 Kings 24:20 For through the anger of the LORD it came to pass in Jerusalem and Judah, until he had cast them out from his presence, that Zedekiah rebelled against the king of Babylon.

Ver. 20. For through the anger of the Lord.] Who hardened Zedekiah’s heart, that he "humbled not himself before Jeremiah," &c. [2 Chronicles 36:12]

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on 2 Kings 24:20". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/2-kings-24.html. 1865-1868.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Thus the people’s sins were the true cause why God gave them wicked kings, whom he suffered to do wickedly, that they might bring the long deserved and threatened punishments upon themselves and their people.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on 2 Kings 24:20". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/2-kings-24.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

20.Zedekiah rebelled — In what year is not said, but probably in the eighth year of his reign. Chronicles says, that the king of Babylon “had made him swear by God” — that is, had bound him by the most solemn oath — (compare Ezekiel 17:13,) to keep the peace by fidelity to the conqueror who had set him on the throne; and in Jeremiah 29:3; Jeremiah 51:59, mention is made of two embassies of Zedekiah to Babylon, with one of which Zedekiah went in person. In Jeremiah 27:3, we find messengers from the kings of Edom, Moab, Ammon, Tyre, and Zidon, consulting with Zedekiah, perhaps concerting a plan to throw off the Babylonian yoke; and in Ezekiel 17:15, Zedekiah is represented as “sending his ambassadors into Egypt, that they might give him horses and much people.” Thus he seems to have laid broad plans for his rebellion, and in all this he was encouraged by the false prophets of his time. Jeremiah 28.

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on 2 Kings 24:20". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/2-kings-24.html. 1874-1909.

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

2 Kings 24:20. For through the anger of the Lord, &c. — God was so highly displeased with this wicked people, that he permitted Zedekiah to break his faith with Nebuchadnezzar, and to rebel against him, forgetting for what cause he changed his name. Unto this revolt, it is probable, he was persuaded by the ambassadors which the kings of Edom, Moab, Ammon, Tyre, and Zidon, sent unto him, to solicit him to throw off the yoke of the king of Babylon, Jeremiah 27:2-4, &c.; which was the greater crime, because he had taken a solemn oath that he would be true to him, 2 Chronicles 36:13. The king of Egypt also, it is likely, promised him help, Ezekiel 17:15; and Hananiah, a false prophet, assured him God would, in two years time, break the yoke of the king of Babylon, and bring back all the vessels of the house of God, with Jehoiachin and all the captives: see Jeremiah 28:1-4. Jeremiah indeed proved that he made them trust in a lie, by predicting his death that very year, which accordingly came to pass, 2 Kings 24:15-17. But they still persisted in their vain hopes, there being other deceivers that prophesied falsely in God’s name, Jeremiah 29:8-9 : and they most of all deceived themselves with proud conceits that they were the true seed of Abraham, who had a right to that land, Ezekiel 33:24. The people’s sins, therefore, as Poole has justly observed, were the true cause why God gave them wicked kings, whom he suffered to act wickedly, that they might bring the long-deserved and threatened punishments upon themselves and their people.

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Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on 2 Kings 24:20". Joseph Benson's Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/2-kings-24.html. 1857.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Revolted. Literally, "departed;" (Haydock) "broke his covenant;" (Septuagint) acting contrary to his oath, (Paralipomenon) and to the dictates of prudence. God permitted this to take place, in the 8th year of Sedecias. (Calmet)

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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on 2 Kings 24:20". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/2-kings-24.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

rebelled. Though bound by oath (2 Chronicles 36:13. Ezekiel 17:13).

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on 2 Kings 24:20". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/2-kings-24.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

For through the anger of the LORD it came to pass in Jerusalem and Judah, until he had cast them out from his presence, that Zedekiah rebelled against the king of Babylon.

Through the anger of the Lord ... he ... cast them out from his presence - i e., in the course of God's righteous providence his policy as king would prove ruinous to his country.

Zedekiah rebelled. Instigated by ambassadors from the neighbouring states, who came to congratulate him on his accession to the throne (cf. Jeremiah 17:3 with 28:1), and at the same time get him to join them in a common league to throw off the Assyrian yoke. Though warned by Jeremiah against this step, the infatuated and perjured (Ezekiel 17:13) Zedekiah persisted in his revolt, by forming an alliance with Pharaoh-hophra - i:e., Apries, grandson of Nechoh, king of Egypt, and the most energetic and successful monarch of that kingdom since Psammeticus.

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Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on 2 Kings 24:20". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/2-kings-24.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(20) For through . . . in Jerusalem.—Literally, for upon the anger of Jehovah it befel Jerusalem. That which fell upon Jerusalem and Judah like a ruinous disaster was the evil doing of Zedekiah, mentioned in 2 Kings 24:19. That such a prince as Zedekiah was raised to the throne was itself a token of Divine displeasure, for his character was such as to hasten the final catastrophe.

Until he had cast them out.—See Note on 2 Kings 17:23.

That Zedekiah rebelled.—Rather, and Zedelciah rebelled. There should be a full stop after “presence.” Zedekiah expected help from Pharaoh Hophra (Apries), king of Egypt, to whom he sent ambassadors (Ezekiel 17:15; comp. Jeremiah 37:5; Jeremiah 44:30.) Moreover the neighbouring peoples of Edom, Ammon, and Moab, as well as Tyre and Zidon, were eager to throw off the Babylonian yoke, and had proposed a general rising to Zedekiah (Jeremiah 27:3 seq.) The high hopes which were inspired by the negotiations may be inferred from the prophecy of Hananiah (Jeremiah 28). Jeremiah opposed the project of revolt to the utmost of his power; and the event proved that he was right. In the early part of his reign Zedekiah had tried to procure the return of the exiles carried away in the last reign (Jeremiah 29:3); and in his fourth year he visited Babylon himself, perhaps with the same object, and to satisfy Nebuchadnezzar of his fidelity (Jeremiah 51:59). The date of his open revolt cannot be fixed.

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on 2 Kings 24:20". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/2-kings-24.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

For through the anger of the LORD it came to pass in Jerusalem and Judah, until he had cast them out from his presence, that Zedekiah rebelled against the king of Babylon.
through
22:17; Exodus 9:14-17; Deuteronomy 2:30; Isaiah 19:11-14; 1 Corinthians 1:20; 2 Thessalonians 2:9-11
Zedekiah
2 Chronicles 36:13; Jeremiah 27:12-15; 38:17-21; Ezekiel 17:15-20 Reciprocal: Genesis 4:16 - went;  Joshua 23:16 - then shall;  2 Kings 13:23 - neither cast he;  2 Kings 17:4 - found conspiracy;  Ezra 4:15 - for which;  Ezra 4:19 - and it is found;  Jeremiah 7:15 - I will;  Jeremiah 37:2 - neither;  Jeremiah 52:2 - he did;  Ezekiel 17:7 - another;  Ezekiel 19:14 - fire;  Ezekiel 21:23 - but

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on 2 Kings 24:20". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/2-kings-24.html.