Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

2 Kings 5:1

Now Naaman, captain of the army of the king of Aram, was a great man with his master, and highly respected, because by him the Lord had given victory to Aram. The man was also a valiant warrior, but he was a leper.
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Countenance;   Elisha;   Joram;   Miracles;   Naaman;   Readings, Select;   Thompson Chain Reference - Lepers;   Naaman;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Diseases;   Syria;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Naaman;   Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Elisha;   Syria;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Heal, Health;   Easton Bible Dictionary - Leprosy;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Elisha;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Deliverance, Deliverer;   Elisha;   False Worship;   Kings, 1 and 2;   Naaman;   Prophecy, Prophets;   Samaria, Samaritans;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Damascus;   Naaman;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Salvation;   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Naaman ;   The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Abana;   Naaman;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Elisha;   Gehazi;   Smith Bible Dictionary - Eli'sha;   Geha'zi;   Leper, Leprosy;   Na'aman;   Wilson's Dictionary of Bible Types - Naaman;   Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - War;  
Encyclopedias:
Condensed Biblical Cyclopedia - Kingdom of Israel;   International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Honorable;   Leper;   Naaman;   The Jewish Encyclopedia - Elisha;   Naaman;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

Naaman, captain of the host - Of Naaman we know nothing more than is related here. Jarchi and some others say that he was the man who drew the bow at a venture, as we term it, and slew Ahab: see 1 Kings 22:34; (note), and the notes there. He is not mentioned by Josephus, nor has he any reference to this history; which is very strange, as it exists in the Chaldee, Septuagint, and Syriac.

King of Syria - The Hebrew is ארם מלך melech Aram, king of Aram; which is followed by the Chaldee and Arabic. The Syriac has Adom ; but as the Syriac dolath is the same element as the Syriac rish, differing only in the position of the diacritic point, it may have been originally Aram. The Septuagint and Vulgate have Syria, and this is a common meaning of the term in Scripture. If the king of Syria be meant, it must be Ben-hadad; and the contemporary king of Israel was Jehoram.

A great man - He was held in the highest esteem.

And honorable - Had the peculiar favor and confidence of his master; and was promoted to the highest trusts.

Had given deliverance unto Syria - That is, as the rabbins state, by his slaying Ahab, king of Israel; in consequence of which the Syrians got the victory.

A mighty man in valor - He was a giant, and very strong, according to the Arabic. He had, in a word, all the qualifications of an able general.

But he was a leper - Here was a heavy tax upon his grandeur; he was afflicted with a disorder the most loathsome and the most humiliating that could possibly disgrace a human being. God often, in the course of his providence, permits great defects to be associated with great eminence, that he may hide pride from man; and cause him to think soberly of himself and his acquirements.

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Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on 2 Kings 5:1". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/2-kings-5.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

By him the Lord had given deliverance unto Syria - An Assyrian monarch had pushed his conquests as far as Syria exactly at this period, bringing into subjection all the kings of these parts. But Syria revolted after a few years and once more made herself independent. It was probably in this war of independence that Naaman had distinguished himself.

But he was a leper - leprosy admitted of various kinds and degrees Leviticus 13; 14Some of the lighter forms would not incapacitate a man from discharging the duties of a courtier and warrior.

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on 2 Kings 5:1". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/2-kings-5.html. 1870.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

ELISHA HEALED THE LEPROSY OF NAAMAN; THE GREAT GENERAL

This is one of the most popular stories of the O.T., and it has the distinction of being specifically mentioned by our Lord Jesus Christ (Luke 4:27). It is difficult to find fault with Matthew Henry's observation that Jesus Christ by that reference made the episode, "Typical of the calling of the Gentiles; and therefore Gehazi's stroke may be looked upon as typical of the blinding and rejecting of the Jews, who envied God's grace to the Gentiles, as Gehazi envied Elisha's favor to Naaman."[1]

A CAPTIVE MAIDEN SPOKE OF GOD'S PROPHET

"Now Naaman, captain of the host of the king of Syria, was a great man with his master, and honorable, because by him Jehovah had given victory unto Syria: he was also a mighty man of valor, but he was a leper. And the Syrians had gone out in bands, and had brought away captive out of the land of Israel a little maiden; and she waited on Naaman's wife. And she said unto her mistress, Would that my lord were with the prophet that is in Samaria! then would he recover him of his leprosy. And he went in and told his lord, saying, Thus and thus said the maiden that is of the land of Israel."

The unsung heroine of this whole narrative is this precious little girl who had been captured by the Syrians and made a slave to the house of Naaman. Instead of becoming bitter against her exploiters and harboring an undying hatred of them, she accepted her fate with meekness and exhibited deep friendship and sympathy with her mistress and her husband, Naaman.

It was this captive maiden who enlightened the great lord of the Syrian armies of the existence of a true prophet of God in Samaria and of his ability to cure leprosy.

What an exhortation is this for everyone to seize all opportunities to speak of God and His great power to benefit sinful and suffering humanity! Through the word of this servant girl, the king of Syria received the knowledge of a true prophet of God in Samaria, information which was not even known (because of his own fault) by the king of Israel (Joram).

"By him Jehovah had given the victory unto Syria" (2 Kings 5:1). Some scholars have marveled that Jehovah in this expression is accredited with the victory of Syria, but this is in full keeping with Daniel 4:25c. As for which victory is spoken of here, Hammond thought it was probably a victory over an army of Shalmanezer II that had threatened the independence of Syria.[2]

"But he was a leper" (2 Kings 5:1). It is rather annoying that a number of commentators go out of the way to tell us that the word "leper" in this passage came from a Hebrew term, "covering a large variety of scabious diseases, being used even of mould in houses."[3] Such a comment has no utility except that of DOWNGRADING this miracle. One writer even mentioned that Hansen's disease (the modern name of true leprosy) was rare in those times. However, the king of Israel rated the king of Syria's request for the healing of Naaman's disease as the equivalent of God's ability to "kill and to make alive" (2 Kings 5:7); and that states in tones of thunder that Naaman was truly a leper in the current sense of the word.

The absence of any statement indicating that Naaman had become a social outcast because of his leprosy (as would certainly have been the case in Israel) does not mean that his disease was anything different from leprosy, but that the pagan reaction to it was different from that in Israel.

"Would that my lord were with the prophet that is in Samaria" (2 Kings 5:3). It is sometimes insinuated that this contradicts other Biblical passages. Montgomery wrote that, "The prophet is presented as having a house in Samaria, and yet he was last seen in Shunem."[4] So what! Elisha never lived in Shunem, but only stopped overnight there on his occasional passing through the place. Besides that, 2 Kings 6:32 indicates clearly that Elisha had a house in Samaria, a fact strongly supported by the offer of the prophet to speak to the king on behalf of the Shunammite woman. Elisha doubtless had access to the presence of the kings both of Israel and of Judah.

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Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
Bibliographical Information
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on 2 Kings 5:1". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/2-kings-5.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Now Naaman, captain of the host of the king of Syria,.... The general of Benhadad's army; for he was now king of Syria, though some think Hazael his successor was:

was a great man with his master; high in his favour and esteem:

and honourable; not only acceptable to the king, and loaded with honours by him, but greatly respected by all ranks and degrees among the people:

because by him the Lord had given deliverance unto Syria; out of the hands of their enemies, and victory over them, and particularly in the last battle with Israel, in which Ahab was slain, and, as the Jews suppose, by the hands of Naaman; see Gill on 1 Kings 22:34 however, when any salvation was wrought, or victory obtained, even by Heathens, and by them over Israel, the people of God, it was of the Lord:

he was also a mighty man in valour; a very courageous valiant man:

but he was a leper; was stricken with the leprosy, which had deformed and disgraced his person, and weakened his strength, and dispirited him; all his grandeur and honour could not protect him from this loathsome disease.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on 2 Kings 5:1". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/2-kings-5.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

Now Naaman, captain of the host of the king of Syria, was a great man with his master, and honourable, because by him the LORD had given a deliverance unto Syria: he was also a mighty man in valour, [but he was] a leper.

(a) Here it appears that among the infidels God has his, and also that the infidels esteem those who do good to their country.
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Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on 2 Kings 5:1". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/2-kings-5.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

2 Kings 5:1-7. Naaman‘s leprosy.

Naaman, captain of the host of the king of Syria, was a great man with his master — highly esteemed for his military character and success.

and honourable — rather, “very rich.”

but he was a leper — This leprosy, which, in Israel, would have excluded him from society, did not affect his free intercourse in the court of Syria.

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This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on 2 Kings 5:1". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/2-kings-5.html. 1871-8.

Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary

CONTENTS

The interesting ministry of Elisha is continued throughout this chapter. The prophet healeth Naaman, the Syrian, of his leprosy. He refuseth the gifts and rewards of the Syrian. Gehazi, his servant, taking them, is in judgment smitten with the leprosy.

2 Kings 5:1

How beautiful is the account given by the sacred historian of this Naaman, by way of raising our notions of him. He was a great man; and an honourable man, and though an heathen, and an idolator, yet the Lord had given him success in arms; but in the midst of all these things, the dreadful, loathsome disease of the leprosy, made him a matter of terror to everyone that came near him, lest they should be infected by him. As a commentator once said, in reading this account of Naaman, "there was not a slave in Syria which would have exchanged his skin with him." Reader! such is sin! Wherever it is, and in whomsoever it reigns, it throws down all other endowments!

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Hawker, Robert, D.D. "Commentary on 2 Kings 5:1". "Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pmc/2-kings-5.html. 1828.

James Nisbet's Church Pulpit Commentary

THE ONE DRAWBACK

‘But he was a leper.’

2 Kings 5:1

I. How often is it seen, in human experience, that a condition, otherwise of perfect prosperity, has one alloy, one drawback, which damages or spoils it for its possessor.—We need not confine our observation to lives of great men—written in history or written in Scripture—who have made peace or war, and left their names as the heirloom of one country, or the common property of all—and who yet, scrutinised keenly, have been objects rather of pity than of envy, by reason of some one blessing denied, or by reason of some one ‘sorrow added.’ ‘A great man and honourable with his master … a mighty man of valour … yet a leper’—might be the inscription, if we knew all, upon many of those celebrities of which (to quote the grand old saying) ‘every land is the tomb.’

But is it not so quite in common lives, quite in humble homes? Where is the house in which there is no one element of dissatisfaction—some uncongenial disposition, some unreasonable temper to be borne with—a particular thing that cannot be had or that cannot be done—a difficult task always recurring, a disagreeable future always menacing—a taste that cannot be indulged, or a whim that must be complied with—a dead weight of encumbrance always pressing, and a promised relief always ‘a little beyond’?

II. I propose the example of Naaman as a wonderful lesson in the treatment of drawbacks.—What an excuse had Naaman for a life of idle regret, absolute uselessness, and sinful repining! With what discomfort, with what distress, with what shame and mortification, must each act of his life, social, political, military, have been accomplished! How must he have felt himself the topic of remark or the object of ridicule, amongst all whom he addressed and all whom he commanded! Yet none the less did he do his duty, command his energies, and rule his spirit. Thou who hast in thy health, or in thy work, or in thy home, some like drawback—little it must be in comparison with his—go, and do thou likewise.

III. We take an onward step in our subject when we treat ‘the one drawback’ as ‘the one fault.’—Of how many persons within our own circle must we say, he is all this and that—he is industrious, useful, honourable, he is a great man with his master, he is serviceable to his generation—but he has one fault. Perhaps, he is just and upright, but he is unamiable. Perhaps he is kind and affectionate, but he is untruthful. Perhaps he is excellent in every relation except one. Perhaps he is strict with himself, inflexible to evil—but he is also ungenerous, censorious, suspicious, or even cruel. Perhaps he is charitable, indulgent, good to all—but he takes the license which he gives, and his character (in one respect) will not bear investigation. He is like the ‘cake not turned’ that Hosea speaks of—one side dough, the other side cinder: he was a great man, valorous and chivalrous—but he was a leper.

Yes, the one fault is in all of us—and we mean by it, the particular direction in which the taint and bias of evil in the fallen creature works its course and finds its outlet. It is idle, it is ridiculous, to profess ignorance that there is no such thing as perfection in the creature that has once let the devil in and tried to shut out God—and this is the true diagnosis of man, such as we see and show him—a broken vessel—a temple in ruins—in one word (for none can be more expressive) a fallen being. The one fault is in theological language, the besetting sin. Who has not one such?

IV. So, brethren, try this day the healing stream.—The disease which is upon us goes very deep and spreads very widely—it is past human cure, our own or our brother’s—there is but One Who has the secret of it, but One Who has the virtue. Forgiveness He offers, ere He offers the cleansing—forgiveness of the worst possible, ere He so much as inspects the malady. The double cure—first of the guilt, then of the power—this is the charm of the water which is blood, of the blood which is water.

Dean Vaughan.

Illustrations

(1) ‘Herein is the difference between the natural man and Naaman. Naaman knew himself to be a leper; he loathed his leprosy, and desired to be healed. Alas! how difficult it is to persuade the natural man, first to see, and then to bewail his leprosy; to understand that a creature can only be created to obey his Creator; and that when a creature’s nature is so corrupted as to render him unwilling and unable so to obey, then the creature is condemned, and in his unwillingness and inability bears the death-mark upon him.’

(2) ‘The frightful disease from which Naaman suffered must have been a terrible drawback to his happiness and prosperity. It was the occasion, however, of his greatest blessing. The special mercy of God flowed to him from that which probably he was accustomed to consider his special curse. And it often happens with ourselves, that the one thing which at one time seemed to mar our happiness is that to which we afterwards have occasion to look back as opening out for us the way of peace.’

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Nisbet, James. "Commentary on 2 Kings 5:1". Church Pulpit Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cpc/2-kings-5.html. 1876.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

2 Kings 5:1 Now Naaman, captain of the host of the king of Syria, was a great man with his master, and honourable, because by him the LORD had given deliverance unto Syria: he was also a mighty man in valour, [but he was] a leper.

Ver. 1. Because by him the Lord had given deliverance.] At that time, probably, when Ahab and Jehoshaphat came against Ramothgilead, [1 Kings 22:29] Naaman was commander-in-chief of the Syrian’s army; and the Rabbis tell us that it was he who shot the arrow wherewith Ahab was slain. Hence he is said to have saved Syria, like as afterwards Marius saved Italy, Flaminius Greece, Fabius Rome, Hunniades Hungary, &c.

But he was a leper.] Not from his birth, nor yet to his death. Hence a learned writer of ours fitly compareth the whole Church of Christ in all her ages to this Naaman the Syrian. He was first pure and sound, and did many honourable acts, and thereby represented the primitive Church, pure and clean, without spot or disease appearing; howbeit, there might be some secret seeds of diseases unperceived, which in continuance of time grew to a visible leprosy. In his middle time he became leprous, diseased, and deformed, foully infected in himself, and infecting others; and thereby represented the latter Church of Rome. Afterwards, by the prophet’s direction, he was washed and cleansed from his leprosy, and his flesh restored to become pure and perfect, like the flesh of a young child; and thereby represented our Reformed Churches. (a) And as Naaman in all these three estates was the same person, and not a new, diverse, or several man; so our Church is not a new Church, but the old Church reformed from errors and corruptions, and restored to her ancient purity and soundness.

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on 2 Kings 5:1". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/2-kings-5.html. 1865-1868.

Sermon Bible Commentary

2 Kings 5:1

(with 2 Kings 5:13)

Consider:—

I. What a fund of wisdom is contained in that remark of the servants of Naaman, "If the prophet had bid thee do some great thing, wouldest thou not have done it"! How true is this with reference to a variety of acts, duties, and remedies proposed for us. It is seen in our behaviour in illness, in social domestic intercourse, and in reference to Christ's holy ordinances of baptism and the Lord's Supper. The very easiness and simplicity of these rites should recommend them to our acceptance. Let all who think otherwise turn to the words of the text.

II. Once more look at the greatest lesson of all that this history teaches. Leprosy represents sin, and the leper is the sinner; and so we are all represented by Naaman. Naaman was cured by washing, as he was bidden, in Jordan—a type of the blood of Christ, which cleanseth from all sin. As nothing would avail Naaman till he came and stood like a suppliant at the door of Elisha, so nothing shall avail us till, like humble suitors, we sit at the feet of Jesus Christ; and there is salvation in no other.

R. D. B. Rawnsley, Village Sermons, 3rd series, p. 186.


References: 2 Kings 5:1.—C. J. Vaughan, Temple Sermons, p. 379; E. Monro, Practical Sermons, vol. iii., p. 195; G. B. Ryley, Christian World Pulpit. vol. v., p. 280; E. Blencowe, Plain Sermons to a Country Congregation, 1st series, p. 350. 2 Kings 5:1-3.—T. T. Munger, Lamps and Paths, p. 173. 2 Kings 5:1-7.—A. Edersheim, Elisha the Prophet, p. 137.

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Nicoll, William R. "Commentary on 2 Kings 5:1". "Sermon Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/sbc/2-kings-5.html.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

2 KINGS CHAPTER 5

Naaman, by his captive maid’s report, goeth to Elisha to be cured of his leprosy, 2 Kings 5:1-9. Elisha sends to him a command to wash in Jordan: he is angry, and disdaineth it: his servants’ advice: he doth it, and is healed, 2 Kings 5:10-14. He returneth with gifts to Elisha, who refuseth them: he departs, 2 Kings 5:15-19. Gehazi, Elisha’s servant, abusing his master’s name unto Naaman, taketh gifts from him: is smitten with leprosy, 2 Kings 5:20-27.

A great man with his master; in great power and favour with the king of Syria. Honourable; highly esteemed, both for his quality and success. By him the Lord had given deliverance unto Syria; which expression he useth, partly to mind the Israelites that all the hurt they had from the Tyrians was from the Lord, who used them as his rod, and gave them the successes against Israel, which are recorded; and partly to check that proud conceit which then was working, and afterwards more fully discovered itself, in the Israelitish nation, as if the care, and providence, and goodness of God were wholly confined to themselves, and not imparted to any other people.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on 2 Kings 5:1". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/2-kings-5.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

1.Naaman — According to some of the rabbies, he was the man who drew the bow and unintentionally killed Ahab, king of Israel. 1 Kings 22:34. Josephus, in giving account of Ahab’s death, makes the same statement, but makes no mention of Naaman’s leprosy, or its cure by Elisha.

Captain of the host’ of Syria — Commander-in-chief of the Syrian army.

A great man with his master — That is, greatly prized, loved, and reverenced by his king. In Ben-hadad’s court there was no man so great as Naaman.

By him the Lord had given deliverance unto Syria — That is, by some great and famous exploit Naaman had won a memorable victory for the Syrians. Perhaps the very exploit which had secured him this fame and honour with the king was his shooting Ahab.

A mighty man in valour — A valiant warrior. He was every inch a soldier, and had gained his honours by valour as well as by fortune.

But he was a leper — And this cast a shadow over all his greatness. “Every man,” says Henry, “has some but or other in his character; something that blemishes and diminishes him; some alloy to his grandeur, some damp to his joy; he may be very happy, very good, yet, in something or other, not so good as he should be, nor so happy as he would be. Naaman was as great as the world could make him, and yet the basest slave in Syria would not change skins with him.” In Syria the leprosy was no bar to human society, nor to offices of trust and honour; but in Israel the leper was made to dwell alone, and could not mingle in society. Compare Leviticus 13:46; Numbers 5:2; 2 Chronicles 26:21. The leprosy is a significant type of sin and spiritual impurity; and how many there are of great worldly honour and power, having all of earth that heart need wish, while in spirit they are lepers!

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on 2 Kings 5:1". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/2-kings-5.html. 1874-1909.

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

2 Kings 5:1. Naaman — was a great man with his master — In great power and favour with the king of Syria; and honourable — Highly esteemed, both for his quality and success; because the Lord by him had given deliverance unto Syria — He had been victorious in such battles as he had fought, which coming to pass through the permission or appointment of the Divine Providence, the sacred writer would have the Israelites to look upon it as the Lord’s doing. Let Israel know, that, when the Syrians prevailed, it was from the Lord. He gave them success in their wars, even with Israel, and for Israel’s chastisement. But he was a leper — This did not exclude him from the society of men in that country, where the Jewish law was not in force. But it was a great blemish upon him, and also likely to prove deadly; there being no cure for this disease, a disease very common in Syria.

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Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on 2 Kings 5:1". Joseph Benson's Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/2-kings-5.html. 1857.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

King, Benadad, who had defeated Achab, and was slain by Hazael; (chap. viii.; Tirinus) or, according to Salien, Hazael was already king. (Menochius) --- Josephus passes over this history. It is not known for what reason, (Calmet) unless he was staggered at the petition of Naaman, ver. 18, 19. (Haydock) --- Syria. The Rabbins say, by killing Achab, 3 Kings xxii. 34. But their authority is very small; (Haydock) and he might signalize himself on many other occasions. --- Leper. This malady did not exclude him from court. The Hebrews allowed such to appear in public, till the priests had declared them unclean; and other nations viewed the leprosy with less horror.

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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on 2 Kings 5:1". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/2-kings-5.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

Naaman. Note the five servants in this chapter:
1. The King"s servant (Naaman)
2 Kings 5:1.
2. Naaman"s wife"s servant (the maid),
2 Kings 5:2.
3. Jehovah"s servant (Elisha),
2 Kings 5:8.
4. Naaman"s servants (
2 Kings 5:13).
5. The Prophet"s servant (Gehazi),
2 Kings 5:20.

was = had come to be.

by him. An unconscious instrument.

the LORD. Hebrew. Jehovah. App-4.

deliverance. Probably from the Assyrians.

but, &c. Figure of speech Anesis. App-6.

a leper. Compare Lev 13. Not regarded ceremonially by heathen. Not far gone (2 Kings 5:19). Probably only in initial stage. One of nine so afflicted. See note on Exodus 4:6. The story of Naaman may be compared with the parallel in John 9.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on 2 Kings 5:1". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/2-kings-5.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

Now Naaman, captain of the host of the king of Syria, was a great man with his master, and honourable, because by him the LORD had given deliverance unto Syria: he was also a mighty man in valour, but he was a leper.

Naaman ... was a great man with his master - highly esteemed for his military character and success.

And honourable, [ uwnsu' (Hebrew #5375), exalted, looked up to; Septuagint, tethaumasmenos].

Because by him the Lord had given deliverance unto Syria [ la-'Araam (Hebrew #758); Septuagint, Suria, the name given in the time of the kings to the country north of Canaan]. Yahweh, the God of Israel, is here represented as guiding the destinies of a pagan kingdom-not a mere local deity, as idolaters placed some one or other of their numerous divinities over certain provinces; but the Great Being whose superintending providence is over all the nations of the earth.

But he was a leper. This leprosy, which in Israel would have excluded him from society, did not affect his free contact in the court of Syria.

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Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on 2 Kings 5:1". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/2-kings-5.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

V.

ELISHA HEALS NAAMAN THE SYRIAN’S LEPROSY, AND PUNISHES GEHAZI THEREWITH.

(1) Now.—The construction implies a break between this narrative and the preceding. Whether the events related belong to the time of Jehoram or of the dynasty of Jehu is not clear. Evidently it was a time of peace between Israel and Syria.

Naaman (beauty).—A title of the sun-god. (See Note on Isaiah 17:10.)

A great man with his master.—Literally, before his lord. (Comp. Genesis 10:9.)

Honourable.—In special favour. Literally, lifted up of face. (Comp. 2 Kings 3:14, Note; Isaiah 3:3.)

By him the Lord had given deliverance unto Syria.—Notice the high prophetic view that it is Jehovah, not Hadad or Rimmon, who gives victory to Syria as well as Israel. (Comp. Amos 9:7.) It is natural to think of the battle in which Ahab received his mortal wound (1 Kings 22:30, seq.). The Midrash makes Naaman the man who “drew the bow at a venture” on that occasion. The “deliverance” was victory over Israel.

He was also a mighty man in valour, but he was a leper.—Literally, and the man was a brave warrior, stricken with leprosy. His leprosy need not have been so severe as to incapacitate him for military duties. The victor over Israel is represented as a leper who has to seek, and finds, his only help in Israel (Thenius).

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on 2 Kings 5:1". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/2-kings-5.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Now Naaman, captain of the host of the king of Syria, was a great man with his master, and honourable, because by him the LORD had given deliverance unto Syria: he was also a mighty man in valour, but he was a leper.
A. M. 3110. B.C. 894. Naaman
Luke 4:27
a great
4:8; Exodus 11:3; Esther 9:4; 10:3
with
Heb. before. honourable. or, gracious. Heb. lifted up, or accepted in countenance. by him.
Proverbs 21:31; Isaiah 10:5,6; Jeremiah 27:5,6; Deuteronomy 2:37; John 19:11; Romans 15:18
deliverance
or, victory. a leper.
27; 7:3; Leviticus 13:2,3,44-46; Numbers 12:10-12; 2 Samuel 3:29; 2 Chronicles 26:19-23; 2 Corinthians 12:7
Reciprocal: Genesis 34:19 - honourable;  Numbers 24:23 - when God;  Joshua 8:7 - for the Lord;  Judges 3:12 - and the Lord;  Judges 11:1 - a mighty;  2 Samuel 23:10 - the Lord;  1 Kings 8:41 - cometh out;  2 Kings 14:27 - he saved;  1 Chronicles 11:14 - and the Lord;  2 Chronicles 13:15 - God smote;  Psalm 144:10 - that giveth;  Proverbs 6:35 - regard;  Daniel 2:48 - a great;  Matthew 8:2 - a leper;  Luke 5:12 - full;  Acts 7:25 - God;  1 Corinthians 15:57 - giveth

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on 2 Kings 5:1". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/2-kings-5.html.