Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

2 Kings 5:6

He brought the letter to the king of Israel, saying, "And now as this letter comes to you, behold, I have sent Naaman my servant to you, that you may cure him of his leprosy."
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Elisha;   Intercession;   Joram;   Letters;   Miracles;   Motive;   Naaman;   Readings, Select;   Scofield Reference Index - Miracles;   Thompson Chain Reference - Benhadad;   Bible Stories for Children;   Children;   Home;   Jehoram, or Joram;   Joram or Jehoram;   Pleasant Sunday Afternoons;   Religion;   Stories for Children;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Prophets;  
Dictionaries:
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Elisha;   Syria;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Elisha;   Kings, 1 and 2;   Letter;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Damascus;   Elisha;   Naaman;   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Naaman ;   The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Abana;   Naaman;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Elisha;   Gehazi;   Smith Bible Dictionary - Eli'sha;  
Encyclopedias:
Condensed Biblical Cyclopedia - Kingdom of Israel;   International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Epistle;   Naaman;   Recover;  

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

That thou mayest recover him - literally, “And thou shalt recover him.” The Syrian king presumes that, if there is a cure for leprosy to be had in Israel, the mode of obtaining it will be well known to his royal brother.

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on 2 Kings 5:6". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/2-kings-5.html. 1870.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

And he brought the letter to the king of Israel, saying,.... The contents of which were, so far as it concerned Naaman and his case, which are only observed, these:

now when this letter is come unto thee; was received by him:

behold, I have therewith sent Naaman my servant unto thee; the bearer of it:

that thou mayest recover him of his leprosy; meaning not he himself, but that he would recommend him to the care of a proper person, his prophet, and enjoin him to do the best he could for him; but the king of Israel mistook his meaning, as appears by what follows.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on 2 Kings 5:6". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/2-kings-5.html. 1999.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

2 Kings 5:6 And he brought the letter to the king of Israel, saying, Now when this letter is come unto thee, behold, I have [therewith] sent Naaman my servant to thee, that thou mayest recover him of his leprosy.

Ver. 6. That thou mayest recover him of his leprosy,] sc., By commending him to thy prophet, so famous for his miracles; and by commanding him to cure him.

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Bibliographical Information
Trapp, John. "Commentary on 2 Kings 5:6". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/2-kings-5.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

2 Kings 5:6. That thou mayest recover him of his leprosy Or, "That by thy command the prophet who is with thee may cleanse him." See 2 Kings 5:3. Kings are often said to do those things which they command to be done; in which view, there is no ambiguity in the letter of the king of Syria. But the king of Israel thought himself mocked by it. The king's expression in the next verse, Am I a God, &c.? refers to what we have had occasion to remark in the notes upon Leviticus, that the leprosy was always esteemed a disease immediately inflicted by God, and only to be cured by him.

REFLECTIONS.—Elisha's greatness continues still the subject of the history. It is a pleasing episode, and a relief from the uniform tenor of evil which was in Israel and her kings.

1. Naaman, by means of a captive girl, hears of the prophet's miracles. He was a great general, successful in war, a high favourite with his master, but a leper. The captive girl, though a child when taken, remembered the great prophet in Samaria, and, as a good servant, tells her mistress of him, and wishes her master could see him: he could do more for him than all the physicians of Damascus. Note; (1.) A little child, if taught the knowledge of Jesus, the great prophet, may be a successful preacher; and by the mouths of babes and sucklings God can perfect his praise. (2.) Every good servant must seek the welfare of the family he is in. (3.) Greatness is no protection from the sorest calamities incident to human life. Disease and death find as easy access to the palace as the cottage. (4.) Say all you can of a man's worldly felicity, success, or honour, one but spoils the whole. If he have the uncured leprosy of sin upon him, all besides is but splendid misery.

2. Naaman is eager to improve the hint, though given by so mean a person, and instantly prepares to wait on this great prophet, having mentioned the matter to the king of Syria, and received a strong recommendation to Jehoram, presuming that his authority with the prophet would facilitate the application and cure. With a great retinue, and loaded with suitable presents for the occasion, he hastens on his journey, and, being arrived at Samaria, delivers the letter to the king of Israel. Note; How willing are men to try every expedient, and grudge no expence or trouble, to obtain a cure of their bodily diseases! Who shews such eagerness to bring their diseased souls to the great physician, though the cure there is infallible, and also without money, and without price?

3. Jehoram no sooner read the letter, than he rent his clothes, whether shocked at the blasphemy that he supposed it contained, enjoining him the cure of a leper, which was God's work alone, or terrified with the apprehension that this was done with a design to quarrel with him, in order to invade his country. He had so little concern with God's prophets himself, that he had no idea of a Syrian's coming so far to court their assistance. Note; They who are conscious of their own ill deserts, are ready to terrify themselves at every shadow, and put the worst constructions on what has not the least ill design.

4. Elisha heard the king's distress, and the cause of it; and, though he had just reason to complain of being neglected, yet when the glory of Israel's God is concerned, unsought he proffers his service, and will do for this Syrian what Israel's king cannot, that he may know there is a prophet in Israel. Note; Though wicked men have forfeited every mercy, yet God for his own glory will sometimes help them beyond all that they have reason to expect.

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Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on 2 Kings 5:6". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/2-kings-5.html. 1801-1803.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

i.e. Procure his recovery by the means of Elisha, 2 Kings 5:3,4, whom thou mayest command to use his utmost skill and power herein.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on 2 Kings 5:6". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/2-kings-5.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

6.That thou mayest recover him of his leprosy — The letter made no mention of the prophet Elisha. The king of Syria presumed that Elisha’s fame and power to work miracles was known throughout Samaria, and especially to Jehoram, and he seems to have imagined that the king of Israel had entire control over his prophets, and their miraculous powers.

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on 2 Kings 5:6". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/2-kings-5.html. 1874-1909.

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

2 Kings 5:6. Now when this letter is come unto thee, &c. — The beginning of the letter, which, it is likely, contained the usual compliments, is omitted, as not pertinent to the matter in hand. That thou mayest recover him of his leprosy — Or, That, by thy command, the prophet that is with thee may cleanse him; for kings are often said to do those things which they command to be done: in which view, there is no ambiguity in this letter of the king of Syria. But this not being plainly expressed, the king of Israel apprehended that the intention of this demand was only to pick a quarrel with him, and seek an occasion, or rather a pretence, for a war with him.

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Bibliographical Information
Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on 2 Kings 5:6". Joseph Benson's Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/2-kings-5.html. 1857.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

recover. A Homonym, with another meaning, to snatch away or destroy, as in Psalms 26:9 and Jeremiah 16:5. See notes there.

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Bibliographical Information
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on 2 Kings 5:6". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/2-kings-5.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

And he brought the letter to the king of Israel, saying, Now when this letter is come unto thee, behold, I have therewith sent Naaman my servant to thee, that thou mayest recover him of his leprosy.

No JFB commentary on this verse.

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Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on 2 Kings 5:6". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/2-kings-5.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(6) Now.—Heb., And now, continuing an omitted passage. Only the principal sentence of the letter is given. The message pre-supposes a not altogether hostile relation between the two kings; and the words of the next verse, “He seeketh a quarrel against me,” point to the time of comparative lull which ensued after the luckless expedition to Ramoth-gilead (1. Kings 22), and the short reign of the invalid Ahaziah; i.e., to the reign of Jehoram, not to that of Jehoahaz, in which Israel was wholly crushed by Syria (2 Kings 13:3-7). Schenkel thinks the Syrian inroads (2 Kings 5:2) indicate the reign of Jehu, and that Hazael was the king who wrote the letter, as he was personally acquainted with Elisha (2 Kings 5:5, seq.). But, as Thenius remarks, he forgets that the relations between Jehu and Syria were throughout strained to the last degree, so that such a friendly passage between the two kings as is here described is not to be thought of.

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Bibliographical Information
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on 2 Kings 5:6". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/2-kings-5.html. 1905.