Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

2 Kings 5:9

So Naaman came with his horses and his chariots and stood at the doorway of the house of Elisha.
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Chariot;   Elisha;   Joram;   Leprosy;   Miracles;   Naaman;   Readings, Select;   Scofield Reference Index - Miracles;   Thompson Chain Reference - Bible Stories for Children;   Children;   Home;   Pleasant Sunday Afternoons;   Religion;   Stories for Children;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Chariots;   Leprosy;   Travellers;  
Dictionaries:
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Elisha;   Healing;   Syria;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Elisha;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Kings, 1 and 2;   Transportation and Travel;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Chariot;   Damascus;   Elisha;   Naaman;   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Naaman ;   The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Abana;   Naaman;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Chariots;   Elisha;   Gehazi;   Smith Bible Dictionary - Eli'sha;  
Encyclopedias:
Condensed Biblical Cyclopedia - Kingdom of Israel;   International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Naaman;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

Came with his horses and with his chariot - In very great pomp and state. Closely inspected, this was preposterous enough; a leper sitting in state, and affecting it!

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Bibliographical Information
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on 2 Kings 5:9". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/2-kings-5.html. 1832.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

So Naaman came with his horses, and with his chariot,.... In his chariot drawn by horses; or "with horsemen and chariots", a great retinue, both for his own grandeur, and for the honour of the prophet, and to make him the more respectable by him:

and stood at the door of the house of Elisha; who now dwelt at Gilgal, as is probable, see 2 Kings 4:38, hither Naaman was directed, and here he stopped; and having sent a messenger to Elisha to acquaint him who he was, and what was his business, he stayed waiting for an answer.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on 2 Kings 5:9". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/2-kings-5.html. 1999.

Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary

Reader! do not fail to observe how Naaman came. His gifts were in his hand, and he himself, no doubt, gorgeously dressed, to cover his leprous body. And could he hope that an enemy to Israel, the God of Israel would regard him? Behold in this man, an emblem of the coming of every unawakened sinner! He comes to purchase his salvation. He comes in his best robes, his best chariot, his gifts to hide his sinful soul. Alas! all these most be put off, and the sinner come down from all high flights of fancied goodness, before a cure can be obtained for the leprosy of the soul.

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Hawker, Robert, D.D. "Commentary on 2 Kings 5:9". "Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pmc/2-kings-5.html. 1828.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

2 Kings 5:9 So Naaman came with his horses and with his chariot, and stood at the door of the house of Elisha.

Ver. 9. And stood at the door.] Where the prophet held him; not out of pride, - as that Pope did the emperor whom he made to wait three days at his gate in the depth of winter ere he would admit him, - but humility rather: that God might have the whole glory of all the cure. Hereby also Naaman’s pride was pulled down, and he the better prepared for such a miraculous mercy.

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on 2 Kings 5:9". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/2-kings-5.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

2 Kings 5:9. And stood at the door of the house of Elisha Elisha's not appearing to receive the Syrian general, is ascribed by some to the retired course of life which the prophets led; but then, why did he see him and enter into conversation with him, when he returned from his cure? We should rather think that it was not unbecoming the prophet upon this occasion to take some state upon him, and to support the character and dignity of a prophet of the most high God; especially since this might be a means to raise the honour of his religion and ministry, and to give Naaman a more just idea of his miraculous cure, when he found that it was neither by the prayer nor presence of the prophet, but by the divine power and goodness, that it was effected. In conformity to the law, which requires that lepers, in order to their cleansing, should be sprinkled seven times, Leviticus 14:7; Leviticus 14:57 the prophet ordered Naaman to dip himself as often in Jordan, 2 Kings 5:10. But Jordan, as the Syrian rightly argued, had no more virtue in it than other rivers; nor could cold water of any kind be a proper means of curing this distemper; nay, rather it was contrary to the disease. But the prophet's design in it was, doubtless, to render the miracle more conspicuous, and fully to convince Naaman of the divinity of the God of Israel.

REFLECTIONS.—We have here,

1. Naaman, in all his pomp and splendor, an humble suitor at the prophet's door: and he receives an answer plain and satisfactory, which required only his obedience, and ensured his cure. Note; They who are found waiting upon God, may expect from him an answer of peace.

2. Naaman's pride could not bear either the reception that he met with, or the prescription ordered him; and in a rage he departs. He had promised himself deep respect, some immediate application to his disease, and prayer over him for his cure; and was indignant when, instead of seeing the prophet himself, he only received a message by a servant; and such a message, so foolish in his eyes, so useless! were not the waters of Syria as good as Jordan; and need he have come so far to wash, when he might have the nobler rivers of Abana and Pharphar at home? Note; (1.) A proud spirit interprets the least suspected slight into a heinous affront. (2.) The self-righteous heart, like Naaman, wise in its own conceits, with pride refuses to apply the simple balm of a Saviour's blood, and fancies that something beside is necessary to its cure. (3.) They who turn away from God's methods of grace reject their own mercies.

3. His servants, when his first rage was subsided, presume, with submission, to reason with him on the case. If he would have submitted to the most expensive or most painful methods that might have been prescribed, how much more ought he to yield to one so cheap and so easy? Note; (1.) Men in a passion are deaf to the plainest arguments: when they cool, reason will be heard. (2.) A good servant will rather hazard the displeasure of his master, than see him wound himself by his folly; but if he would succeed, he must wait the proper time, and add the respect and deference which may engage attention. (3.) None ought to be above being told of their faults. (4.) The plainness and freedom of the way of salvation, will render those who reject it the more inexcusable.

4. Naaman heard the wise advice, and, convinced of the reasonableness of the trial, descends to the river, where the experiment exceeds his expectation. His leprosy departed, and his flesh became soft, fair, and plump as the flesh of a little child. Can the waters of Jordan thus cleanse the leprous Syrian, and shall not the fountain of a Saviour's blood much more certainly cleanse the leprous sinner, who in faith descends to wash his spotted soul in this all-purifying stream?

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Bibliographical Information
Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on 2 Kings 5:9". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/2-kings-5.html. 1801-1803.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Waiting for Elisha’s coming to him.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on 2 Kings 5:9". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/2-kings-5.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

9.Came with his horses and’ chariot — In great pomp and state. And he expected that Elisha would show respect for the evidences of royal favour with which he was accompanied.

The house of Elisha — The prophet seems to have had a residence of his own in the city of Samaria. Compare 2 Kings 6:32.

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Bibliographical Information
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on 2 Kings 5:9". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/2-kings-5.html. 1874-1909.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

door = entrance.

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Bibliographical Information
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on 2 Kings 5:9". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/2-kings-5.html. 1909-1922.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(9) With his horses and with his chariot.—Chariots. (See on 2 Kings 2:11-12; and comp. 2 Kings 5:15, infra.) The proper term for a single chariot is used in 2 Kings 5:21. The magnificence of his retinue is suggested.

Stood.—Stopped. The text hardly conveys, as Bähr thinks, the idea that Elisha’s house in Samaria was “a poor hovel,” which the great man would not deign to enter, but waited for the prophet to come forth to him. The prophet had “a messenger” (2 Kings 5:10) at his command.

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Bibliographical Information
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on 2 Kings 5:9". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/2-kings-5.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

So Naaman came with his horses and with his chariot, and stood at the door of the house of Elisha.
3:12; 6:32; Isaiah 60:14; Acts 16:29,30,37-39
Reciprocal: 1 Kings 10:2 - a very great train;  Acts 8:31 - And he

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on 2 Kings 5:9". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/2-kings-5.html.