Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

2 Kings 9:2

When you arrive there, search out Jehu the son of Jehoshaphat the son of Nimshi, and go in and bid him arise from among his brothers, and bring him to an inner room.
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Anointing;   Box;   Church and State;   Elisha;   Enthusiasm;   Jehoshaphat;   Jehu;   Nimshi;   Ramoth-Gilead;   Thompson Chain Reference - Jehu;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Houses;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Jezebel;   King, Kings;   Ramoth;   Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Elisha;   Gilead;   Jehoshaphat;   Jehu;   Ramoth-gilead;   Easton Bible Dictionary - Chamber;   Elijah;   Jehoshaphat;   Jehu;   Nimshi;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Chronology;   Jehoshaphat;   Nimshi;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Elisha;   Flask;   Jehu;   Kings, 1 and 2;   Ramoth-Gilead;   Sons of the Prophets;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Elijah;   Government;   Jehoshaphat;   Jehu;   Nimshi;   Prophecy, Prophets;   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Jehoshaphat ;   Jehu ;   Nimshi ;   Ramoth Gilead ;   The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Chamber;   Jehu;   Ramothgilead;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Chamber;   Smith Bible Dictionary - Jehosh'aphat;   Je'hu;   Nim'shi;   Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Jehu;  
Encyclopedias:
Condensed Biblical Cyclopedia - Kingdom of Israel;   Kingdom of Judah;   International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Jehoshaphat (1);   Jehu;   Nimshi;  

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

And when thou comest thither,.... To Ramothgilead; but from whence he went is uncertain, doubtless where there was a school of the prophets, perhaps that which was erected near Jordan, on the other side of which lay Ramothgilead, 2 Kings 6:1,

look out there Jehu the son of Jehoshaphat the son of Nimshi; the same that Elijah was ordered to anoint, but it was deferred till now, a reprieve being granted to Ahab upon his humiliation, 1 Kings 19:16,

and go in, and make him arise up from among his brethren; the captains of the army:

and carry him into an inner chamber; a chamber within a chamber, as in the original; this he was to do for secrecy, that it might not be seen what he did to Jehu; and lest he should be prevented doing it by the captains, or be exposed to danger for doing it; since that might be deemed treason to do what he was to do, and did, as follows.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on 2 Kings 9:2". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/2-kings-9.html. 1999.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

carry him to an inner chamber — both to ensure the safety of the messenger and to prevent all obstruction in the execution of the business.

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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on 2 Kings 9:2". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/2-kings-9.html. 1871-8.

James Nisbet's Church Pulpit Commentary

JEHU THE ADVENTURER

‘Jehu the son of Jehoshaphat.’

2 Kings 9:2

Who was this adventurer? We may be sure he was no ordinary man who could found the most powerful of all the dynasties of Israel.

I. When we first meet with Jehu he is a young guardsman, just as Napoleon is at first a young lieutenant.—And as Napoleon said that every lieutenant carries a field-marshal’s baton in his knapsack, so perhaps young Jehu, ardent and enthusiastic, was dreaming strange dreams of power from the first. There was a glow of daring on the youth that marked him out for high and desperate enterprise. And long ago (though Jehu never knew of this) God had told Elijah that this young guardsman would be king (1 Kings 19:16-17). His father’s name was Jehoshaphat, and his grandfather’s Nimshi; but we find Jehu commonly referred to as ‘the son of Nimshi.’ I suppose there were fathers then, as there are fathers now, whom the children would willingly forget; fathers whose names recall no happy memories, but deeds and influences that were best forgotten. Jehu, then, was an aspiring soldier, and his promotion was evidently sure and rapid. It was a time when resolute enthusiasm, and when a ready and even reckless daring, were supremely necessary to distracted Israel. We find Jehu chosen from his company to ride in the royal chariot of King Ahab (2 Kings 9:25). It was a signal mark of the king’s confidence, and it was sure to lead to greater honours. So we are not surprised, when our chapter opens, to read that these greater honours have arrived, and that Jehu is chief captain in the army. There has been a great outcry that in our army promotion is secured in unworthy ways. It has been hinted that merit can do little, and social influence can do almost anything. But in the armies of Israel it was different. There was a great career for the born soldier. Jehu begins life as a lieutenant with a field-marshal’s baton in his knapsack.

II. When King Joram, then, was wounded at Ramoth-gilead (2 Kings 8:28), he was removed with all speed to the capital, just as our King hastened to London when a dangerous operation was impending.—Jehu was left in command at Ramoth-gilead. He was holding a council of war with his brother officers. Suddenly a young man burst in on their deliberations, and with a rude directness that compelled attention, and with a passion that had a note of frenzy in it, he demanded audience of the captain. Jehu retired with him into a secret chamber, wondering in his heart what this might mean. I think he was prepared for stirring tidings, but not for the swift act that followed. The young man had a vial of oil under his cloak. He unsealed it and poured the oil on Jehu. ‘In the name of the Lord God of Israel,’ he cried, ‘I anoint thee king over the Lord’s people.’ And then, having uttered a curse upon the house of Ahab, he opened the door behind him and was gone.

III. Jehu’s first thought was that this was all a plot.—It was a ruse of his fellow-captains to spur him on. The army, he knew, was seething with rebellion. The staff was sick and tired of their allegiance. It flashed on Jehu that the hour to strike had come, and that this was a veiled summons from his comrades. The hour to strike had come, it was quite true. But the call to lead came from a higher than man. Jehu was like little Samuel, who thought that the voice he heard was that of Eli, and all the time it was the voice of God. Then Jehu, like Samuel, discovered his mistake. The captains knew nothing of the matter. Jehu revealed it to them, word for word. Was not the oil still dropping from his head? It was the very tidings the captains had been longing for. Smouldering rebellion burst into a flame. They flung off their cloaks and made an impromptu throne with them. They blew the trumpets. They cried, ‘Jehu is king!’ The word of God to Elijah had come true. The sun of Nimshi had reached the throne at last (2 Kings 9:13).

IV. Three points sum up Jehu’s character.

(a) Zeal without obedience, love, or consistency. He was naturally thorough. He never did things by halves. He drove furiously through life, but he never kept the track of simple obedience. He was the whirlwind among the kings. Zeal alone is often terrible, but it is rarely beneficial.

(b) Occasional right acting, but always from base, and often from utterly bad motives.

(c) A destructive, but not a constructive, career. What good is it to wipe out superstition if we do not plant faith in its place?

Illustrations

(1) ‘In the rising and downfall of the dynasties of Israel there is much that reminds us of Scottish history. There is the same story of intrigue and bloodshed, illuminated by the truest heroism. If one were asked to name the most heroic of Scottish kings, the instant reply would be Robert Bruce. Yet in the eyes of England Bruce was a perjured traitor, and at the outset of his career, so fraught with glorious issues for Scotland, his hands were dyed with the blood of the Red Comyn. We are reminded of that story when we come to study the history of Jehu. He, too, in the eyes of his monarch was a traitor. His action was a base conspiracy. And he began the last stage of his career with deeds of bloodshed that can hardly be matched in any annals. When Bruce rushed from the altar at Dumfries crying, “I doubt I have slain the Red Comyn,” “Doubt!” answered Kirkpatrick of Closeburn; “mak’ siccar.” But no follower was needed to make the work of Jehu “siccar.” It was carried through with tremendous thoroughness, and with a fiery zeal that has passed into a proverb.’

(2) ‘You remember in Scottish history an instance of a sudden apparition before a king? It occurred in the south transept of Linlithgow Church, where King James the Fourth was praying before Flodden. A man with a great pikestaff in his hand, broke in, crying for the king, and saying he wished to speak with him. He warned the king not to go forward. Nothing but disaster would attend on him. And then, as the old Scots writer puts it (and Sir Walter has made the incident immortal in his Marmion), “he vanished away as he had been a blink of the sun, or a whip of the whirlwind, and could no more be seen.’ That sudden messenger came with a warning. The one who sought Jehu had another message. Yet in point of abruptness and lack of usual deference, and sudden departure like a whip of the whirlwind, the one scene suggests the other.’

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Bibliographical Information
Nisbet, James. "Commentary on 2 Kings 9:2". Church Pulpit Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cpc/2-kings-9.html. 1876.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

2 Kings 9:2 And when thou comest thither, look out there Jehu the son of Jehoshaphat the son of Nimshi, and go in, and make him arise up from among his brethren, and carry him to an inner chamber;

Ver. 2. Make him arise up.] Stay not till he ariseth from the council board, but let him know that thou hast a message to him from the Lord, and take him aside for the purpose. God’s mind must be delivered boldly, but yet wisely and warily.

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Bibliographical Information
Trapp, John. "Commentary on 2 Kings 9:2". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/2-kings-9.html. 1865-1868.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Partly that the work may not be hindered, and partly for the security of thy own person. See 2 Kings 9:3.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on 2 Kings 9:2". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/2-kings-9.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

2.Jehu the son of Jehoshaphat — Not, of course, of king Jehoshaphat, but of Jehoshaphat the son of Nimshi. This Jehu had been with Ahab, and had heard, and laid up in his heart, the fearful prediction of Elijah against that monarch when he went to take possession of Naboth’s vineyard. 1 Kings 21:18-29. Compare 2 Kings 9:25. But already had he been made known to Elijah as the future king of Israel, and that prophet had been commissioned to anoint him; (1 Kings 19:16;) but the commission was, in the providence of God, transferred to Elisha, who now fulfils it by the hand of one of his disciples.

His brethren — His brethren in arms; his fellow-soldiers at Ramoth-gilead.

Carry him — Literally, cause him to come in; that is, lead or conduct him.

Inner chamber — This significant act is to be done in secret. In like manner Saul and David were first privately anointed.

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on 2 Kings 9:2". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/2-kings-9.html. 1874-1909.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Brethren. The captains, ver. 5.

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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on 2 Kings 9:2". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/2-kings-9.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

Jehu the son of Jehoshaphat. In the Assyrian inscriptions he is called the son of Omri.

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Bibliographical Information
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on 2 Kings 9:2". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/2-kings-9.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

And when thou comest thither, look out there Jehu the son of Jehoshaphat the son of Nimshi, and go in, and make him arise up from among his brethren, and carry him to an inner chamber;

Look out there Jehu the son of Jehoshaphat, the son of Nimshi. It appears from this that he was the grandson of Nimshi, though in a loose sense he is commonly called his "son" (2 Kings 9:20; 1 Kings 19:16 : cf. Matthew 1:1).

Carry him to an inner chamber, [ cheder (Hebrew #2315) b

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Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on 2 Kings 9:2". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/2-kings-9.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(2) And when thou comest thither.—Rather, And enter into it—i.e., into the town of Ramoth. This makes it clear that the Israelites had retaken Ramoth from the Syrians (comp. also the mention of “chambers” and “the door” in 2 Kings 9:3, and the order, 2 Kings 9:15, to “let no man escape out of the city”) probably before Joram returned to Jezreel (2 Kings 9:14). Josephus expressly asserts this.

Jehu.—Probably left in supreme command of the forces at Jehoram’s departure, as being the ablest of the generals (so Josephus).

The son of Jehoshaphat.—It is curious that the father of Jehu who executed the sentence of Jehovah upon the house of Ahab should have borne this name (“Jehovah judgeth”). Nothing is known of Jehu’s origin. He is twice mentioned by Shalmaneser II., king of Assyria, as one of his tributaries. In a fragment of his Annals relating to the campaign against Hazael, undertaken in his eighteenth year (see Note on 2 Kings 8:15), the Assyrian monarch states that, after besieging Damascus, and ravaging the Haurân, he marched to the mountains of Baal-rôsh, the foreland of the sea (Carmel?), and set up his royal image thereon. “In that day the tribute of the land of the Tyrians (and) Sidonians, (and) of Ya’ua (Jehu), son of Omri, I received.” On the Black Obelisk there is a representation of Jehu’s tribute-bearers, and, perhaps, of Jehu himself, kneeling before Shalmaneser. The superscription is: “Tribute of Ya’ua, son of Humrì (Omri)—(ingots of) silver and gold, a bowl of gold, ewers of gold, goblets of gold, buckets of gold, (ingots of) lead, a rod of the hand of the king, spears—I received it.”

Go in.—Into Jehu’s house.

From among his brethren—i.e., his comrades in arms; his fellow-captains.

Carry him.—Literally, cause him to enter. The object was secrecy.

An inner chamber.—Literally, a chamber in a chamber. A phrase which occurred in 1 Kings 20:30; 1 Kings 22:25. Thenius thinks this a mark of identity of authorship.

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Bibliographical Information
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on 2 Kings 9:2". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/2-kings-9.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

And when thou comest thither, look out there Jehu the son of Jehoshaphat the son of Nimshi, and go in, and make him arise up from among his brethren, and carry him to an inner chamber;
Jehu
Jehoram having retired from the army, Jehu seems to have been left first in command, having been long employed by Ahab's family.
14; 1 Kings 19:16,17
among his brethern
5,11
inner chamber
Heb. chamber in a chamber.
1 Kings 20:30; 22:25; *margins
Reciprocal: 1 Chronicles 2:38 - Jehu

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Bibliographical Information
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on 2 Kings 9:2". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/2-kings-9.html.