Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

2 Samuel 18:18

Now Absalom in his lifetime had taken and set up for himself a pillar which is in the King's Valley, for he said, "I have no son to preserve my name." So he named the pillar after his own name, and it is called Absalom's Monument to this day.
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Absalom;   Ambition;   King's Dale;   Pillar;   Shaveh;   Scofield Reference Index - Absalom;   Thompson Chain Reference - Monuments;   Pillars, Memorial;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Ambition;   Pillars;   Valleys;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Ahimaaz;   Joab;   Pillar;   Shaveh;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Grave;   Necromancy;   Easton Bible Dictionary - Burial;   Dale, the King's;   King's Dale;   Pillar;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Jehoshaphat, Valley of;   Jerusalem;   Melchizedek;   Salem;   Shaveh, Valley of;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Grave;   Pillar;   Samuel, Books of;   Shaveh;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Abishai;   Absalom;   Footman;   Hand;   Pillar;   Salem;   Samuel, Books of;   Shaveh, Vale of;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Hand ;   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Absalom ;   King's Dale;   Pillar;   Yale, Valley;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Absalom;   David;   Smith Bible Dictionary - Absalom's Pillar,;   Sha'veh;  
Encyclopedias:
Condensed Biblical Cyclopedia - Hebrew Monarchy, the;   International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Abijah;   Absalom (1);   Dale;   King's Vale;   Pillar;   Vale;   Kitto Biblical Cyclopedia - Absalom's tomb;   The Jewish Encyclopedia - Ancestor Worship;   Hand;   Pillar;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

Reared up for himself a pillar - There was a marble pillar in the time of Josephus called Absalom's pillar: and there is one shown to the present day under this name; but it is comparatively a modern structure.

Absalom's place - Literally Absalom's Hand. See the note on 1 Samuel 15:12.

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Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 18:18". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/2-samuel-18.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

The king‘s dale - Anciently the “valley” of “Shaveh” (marginal reference), and apparently in the near neighborhood of Sodom; but the exact site is not known. It quite agrees with Absalom‘s preference for Hebron 2 Samuel 15:7, that his monument should be reared by him in the south. If Absalom‘s monument be placed in the ravine of the Kedron, the “king‘s dale” here is a different place from the “dale of Shaveh.”

Absalom‘s place - literally, “Absalom‘s hand.” (1 Samuel 15:12 note.)

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 18:18". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/2-samuel-18.html. 1870.

The Biblical Illustrator

2 Samuel 18:18

Now Absalom in his life-time had taken and reared up for himself a pillar.

An infidel at the grave of Absalom

Dr. Eremete Pierrotti, a French scientist, architect, and engineer, when an infidel, journeyed through Palestine with the avowed intention of disproving the truth of the Bible. Visiting the heap of stones over Absalom’s grave, an Arab woman came by with her little child, which she held by the hand. In passing, she threw a stone upon the heap marking the tomb of Absalom, and bade the child do the same. “What do you do that for?” “Because it was the grave of a wicked son who disobeyed his father.” “And who was he?” “The son of David,” she replied. The professor started as if a blow had struck him. Here was an Arab woman, a Mahommedan, who probably had never seen a copy of the Scriptures, and could not read a word of them; yet she held these ancient facts, and was teaching her child to fling a stone at the monument called by the name of a son who rebelled against his father. Dr. Pierrotti, Bible in hand, turned to the story of Absalom, and as he read it a new light shone on him. This was the first of many convictions which so wrought upon him that at length he embraced the faith he once attempted to destroy, and devoted his life to the proof and illustration of the sacred Scriptures.

Monuments

“The man who deserves a monument never needs one, and the man who needs one never deserves it.”

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Exell, Joseph S. "Commentary on "2 Samuel 18:18". The Biblical Illustrator. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tbi/2-samuel-18.html. 1905-1909. New York.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Now Absalom in his lifetime had taken,.... Had taken it into his head, had of himself devised it, as Kimchi explains it; he contrived the following scheme to perpetuate his memory:

and reared up for himself a pillar, which is in the king's dale: or valley, the valley of Jehoshaphat; this pillar was of marble, as JosephusF15Antiqu l. 7. c. 10. sect. 3. says, and stood about two furlongs or a quater mile from Jerusalem. The author of Cippi HebraiciF16P. 26. Ed. Hotting. places it at the bottom of the mount of Olives: this is observed to show how vain are the devices and contrivances of men's hearts; Absalom intended to have been buried under or by this monumental pillar near Jerusalem, and, lo, he was buried in a pit, under an heap of stones, in a wood on the other side Jordan; whether his bones were ever removed hither it is not certain, though a notion has obtained that his grave was near this pillar. RauwolffF17Travels, part 3. c. 21. p. 310, 311. Ed. Ray. says, that as you go from the valley of JehoshaphatF18So Benjamin. Itinerar. p. 43. to the Mount of Olives, you see below, towards your left hand, near unto the bridge of the river Kidron, an old square building like unto a steeple; this, although it is believed to this day, not only by Christians, but also by Turks and Moors, to be the grave of Absalom, as you shall see them fling stones into it as they go by, to revenge his unfaithfulness to his father, yet was he not buried there. SandysF19Travels, l. 3. p. 147. Ed. 5. says, at the east end of the bridge (over Kidron), and a little on the north, stands the pillar of Absalom, being yet entire, and of a good fabric, rising in a lofty square, below adorned with half columns, wrought out of the sides and corners, of the Doric form; and then changing into a round, a good height higher doth grow to a point in fashion of a bell, all framed of the growing stone; against this there lies a great heap of stones, which increaseth daily, by Jews and Mahometans throwing stones as they pass by; so that the frontispiece of it, which faces the road, as Le BruynF20Voyage to the Levant, c. 48. p. 188. says, looks like a mountain of stones; but as to the fabric itself, he says, there is not a finer piece of workmanship to be met with in all those parts; it takes up a compass of ground of eighty two feet and an half square; the body, which is square, with its moulding, is one entire piece; and the coping, which is an ornament to it, and runs up into a point, taken with the rest of the work, is above thirty feet high; twenty columns, cut out of the same rock, add to the beauty of this pile; one sees through a broken window a great many pieces of antiquity that hang up in a chamber. Adrichomius also relatesF21Theatrum Terrae Sanet. p 174. , from travellers, that in the king's valley is now a tower, and a large heap of stones, which is increased every day more and more; for Heathens and strangers passing by there have a custom to cast everyone a stone at it, as it were revenging, according to the law, Absalom's rebellion against David his father, and curse him after this manner; let Absalom the parricide be cursed, and whoever unrighteously persecutes their parents are cursed for ever:

for he said, I have no son to keep my name in remembrance; for though he had three sons, it seems they were all dead, see 2 Samuel 14:27,

and he called the pillar after his own name, and it is called unto this day Absalom's place; or his "hand"F23יד χειρ, Sept. "manus", V. L. Montanus. , the work of his hand; some wrongly think it was in the form of an hand; it was an obelisk, or monument, erected to preserve his name; but since it became so infamous, it would have been better to have had it buried in oblivion. Such sepulchral monuments were used in other nations; so Minerva advised TelemachusF24Homer. Odyss. 1. ver. 297. Odyss. 2. ver. 243. to go in quest of his father Ulysses, and if he could not find him, but was assured of his death, then to raise a signal or monument in memory of him, which he resolved to do.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
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Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 18:18". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/2-samuel-18.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

Now Absalom in his lifetime had taken and reared up for himself a pillar, which [is] in the king's dale: for he said, I have no f son to keep my name in remembrance: and he called the pillar after his own name: and it is called unto this day, Absalom's place.

(f) It seemed that God had punished him by taking away his children, (2 Samuel 14:27).
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Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 18:18". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/2-samuel-18.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

Absalom in his lifetime had reared up for himself a pillar — literally, “hand.” In the valley of Jehoshaphat, on the east of Jerusalem, is a tomb or cenotaph, said to be this “pillar” or monument: it is twenty-four feet square, dome-topped, and reaches forty feet in height. This may occupy the spot, but cannot itself be the work of Absalom, as it evidently bears the style of a later architecture.

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This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 18:18". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/2-samuel-18.html. 1871-8.

Keil & Delitzsch Old Testament Commentary

Absalom had erected a monument to himself in the king's valley during his lifetime; “for he said, I have no son to preserve the remembrance of my name, and he called the monument by his own name; and so it was called hand (memorial) of Absalom unto this day.” The לקח before ויּצּב is apparently pleonastic; but it belongs to the diffuse and circumstantial character of the antiquated Hebrew diction (as in Numbers 16:1). מצּבת, a memorial of stone; whether in the form of a column, or an obelisk, or a monolith, cannot be determined (vid., Genesis 28:22; Genesis 31:52). The king's valley, which received its name from the event narrated in Genesis 14:17, was two stadia from Jerusalem according to Josephus ( Ant . vii. 10, 3), and therefore not “close to the Dead Sea,” or in regione transjordanensi (Ges . Thes . pp. 1045, 1377), or “in the Jordan valley in Ephraim” (Tuch and Winer). It was on the eastern side of Jerusalem, in the Kidron valley; though Absalom's pillar, which ecclesiastical tradition has transferred thither, a monument about forty feet in height and pointed like a pyramid, is not of early Hebrew, but of Grecian origin. On the words “I have no son,” see at 2 Samuel 14:27.

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Keil, Carl Friedrich & Delitzsch, Franz. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 18:18". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/kdo/2-samuel-18.html. 1854-1889.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

Now Absalom in his lifetime had taken and reared up for himself a pillar, which is in the king's dale: for he said, I have no son to keep my name in remembrance: and he called the pillar after his own name: and it is called unto this day, Absalom's place.

A pillar — To preserve his name; whereas it had been more for his honour if his name had been buried in perpetual oblivion.

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Wesley, John. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 18:18". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/2-samuel-18.html. 1765.

Scofield's Reference Notes

I have no son

The pillar mentioned must have been reared before the birth of sons to Absalom. Cf. 2 Samuel 14:27. Another view is that his sons died in youth. They are not mentioned in the genealogies.

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Scofield, C. I. "Scofield Reference Notes on 2 Samuel 18:18". "Scofield Reference Notes (1917 Edition)". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/srn/2-samuel-18.html. 1917.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

2 Samuel 18:18 Now Absalom in his lifetime had taken and reared up for himself a pillar, which [is] in the king’s dale: for he said, I have no son to keep my name in remembrance: and he called the pillar after his own name: and it is called unto this day, Absalom’s place.

Ver. 18. Had reared up for himself a pillar.] A pyramis, a triumphal arch, or rather a sepulchral monument; to make him a name, which yet would not be. God crossed him in his pride: for it proved a κενοταφιον, as the Greeks call it; and he as a dead beast was cast out of the way.

Which is in the king’s dale.] As hoping one day to be a king amongst them: and pity but he had been served as that false Earl of Athol was, who, having murdered James, king of Scots, in hope to attain the crown, as his witches had promised him, was indeed crowned, but it was with a crown of red-hot iron clapped upon his head; being one of the tortures wherewith he ended at once his wicked days and desires. (a)

For he said, I have no son.] His sons all died similiarily, after he came from Geshur. God would not allow him to live in his children, who had so wicked a heart toward his father.

And he called the pillar after his own name.] But took no care at all whether his name were "written in the Book of life." {See Trapp on " 9:54"} Erasmus telleth us of some of his time who being at last gasp, would give a great sum of money for a cardinal’s hat, that they might have the title of cardinals engraven upon their tombs.

And it is called unto this day, Absalom’s place.] Heb., Absalom’s hand: or, as Martyr hath it, The work of Absalom. It was a marble pillar with his statue upon it, saith Adrichomius. (b) It might afterwards have been called, as that near Rome is, Colonne infame, the infamous pillar.

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 18:18". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/2-samuel-18.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

2 Samuel 18:18. Now Absalom in his life time had—reared—a pillar The sacred writer mentions this particular, not only to shew the vanity of Absalom, but, we may reasonably conclude, still further to shew the vanity of human life in general. Absalom having lost his sons, (ch. 2 Samuel 14:27.) and being desirous to perpetuate his memory, had erected a pillar, which, no doubt, he designed as a mausoleum or burying-place, and which we may reasonably conclude was equally magnificent with the ambition of him who reared it. But see how short-sighted are mortals! This same Absalom, so far from being buried in this proud monument which he had erected, was killed and buried like a traitor, thrown into a pit, and a great heap of stones laid upon him. The king's dale (mentioned also in Genesis 14:17.) was near Jerusalem; and to this day there is a monument shewn to travellers, called Absalom's pillar; but it is evidently of modern structure. In the time of Josephus, it was nothing more than a single marble pillar. See Doughty, Analect. p. 1. Exerc. 96:

REFLECTIONS.—We have here Absalom among the fugitives, no longer exulting in confidence of success, but seeking by flight to escape the devouring sword. Divine vengeance, however, suffereth him not to live; for, though David's servants, whom he met, offered not to molest him, and his swift beast would quickly carry him out of danger; yet,

1. He is arrested in his flight by the thick boughs of an oak, under which he furiously drove; and his flying locks caught hold of the branches, whilst his mule, on full speed, left him thus hanging. Note; (1.) They who fly from God's arm only rush into the toil. (2.) If his hair was his halter, we see that what was his pride proved at last his shame. (3.) Let disobedient children look to this rebellious son, and tremble at God's vengeance.

2. Joab is informed of the accident, and chides the messenger for not immediately dispatching Absalom; but the man pleads the king's commandment, which, for a thousand shekels, he would not transgress. Joab does not controvert the man's assertion, but, in haste to be gone, inquires the place, and takes his attendants with him; there, beholding the fair mark exposed, with three darts he strikes him through his heart, as he was yet alive, though hung; and, to make sure work, his ten attendants pierce him with many a mortal wound, and leave him dead on the spot. Note; Many find fault with others for not doing that, for which, had they done it, they would have been the first to condemn them.

3. The arch-rebel being dispatched, a retreat is sounded, as the rest would return to their allegiance; and enough of blood had been spilt, so that there needed no prisoners to be executed. Note; In rebellion, severity must be tempered with clemency; every subject that bleeds is a loss to the state itself.

4. Absalom's body is cast into a pit, and covered with a heap of stones, disgraced even in the dust; and thus terminates his aspiring course in the deepest ignominy. Alas! he had erected near Jerusalem a noble sepulchral monument to perpetuate his memory! Note; (1.) To be solicitous about a tomb for our bodies, while we are living in neglect of our souls, is the height of folly. (2.) To perpetuate the remembrance of a great wicked name, is only to perpetuate infamy. (3.) Of all characters, a disobedient child is among the most abhorred.

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Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 18:18". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/2-samuel-18.html. 1801-1803.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

A pillar, to preserve his name in memory; whereas it had been more for his honour if his name had been buried in perpetual oblivion. But this was the effect of his pride and vain-glory.

The king’s dale; a place near Jerusalem so called. Genesis 14:17.

He said, I have no son.

Object. He had three sons, 2 Samuel 14:27.

Answ. Either they were all now dead; or if one of them was left alive, he thought him unfit and unworthy to keep up his name and honour; or he erected this pillar before his sons were born. But the first opinion seems most probable; and it was a remarkable judgment of God, that he who struck at his father’s life, should be punished with the death of all his sons.

Absalom’s place, Heb. Absalom’s hand, i.e. his work, made though not by his hand, yet for him and his glory, and by his procurement.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on 2 Samuel 18:18". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/2-samuel-18.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

18.A pillar — A monumental column inscribed with his own name.

King’s dale — Supposed by some to be the lower part of the Kidron valley, near the pool of Siloam. See at Genesis 14:17.

No son — The three sons mentioned (2 Samuel 14:27) seem to have died in childhood, and their names were never registered.

Called unto this day, Absalom’s place — That is, at the time of the writer the pillar was yet standing and its history known. There still stands in the Kidron valley a monument bearing this name. It is an isolated block hewn out of the rocky ledge, twenty-four feet square and forty in height. Most travellers have decided, with Robinson, that its style of architecture shows the work of a later age than that of Absalom; but some are inclined to identify it with the ancient pillar.

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 18:18". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/2-samuel-18.html. 1874-1909.

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

2 Samuel 18:18. Now Absalom had reared up for himself a pillar — To preserve his name; where as it had been more for his honour if his name had been buried in perpetual oblivion. But this was the effect of that pride and vain glory, which were the chief causes of his ruin. Which is in the king’s dale A place so called, near Jerusalem. For he said, I have no son — He had had three sons, (2 Samuel 14:27,) but it appears by this they were all now dead, or if any one of them was alive, he thought him unfit and unworthy to keep up his name and honour; and it was a remarkable dispensation of divine providence, that he, who struck at his father’s life, should be punished with the death of all his sons. It is called unto this day, &c. — That is, unto the time when this book was compiled. Indeed, to this day there is a monument, shown to travellers, called Absalom’s Pillar; but it is evidently of modern structure. In the time of Josephus, it was nothing more than a single marble pillar. Absalom’s Place — Hebrew, Absalom’s hand, that is, his work; made, though not by his hand, yet for him and his glory, and by his appointment. But this work of vanity soon became a memorial of reproach. “Strange power of guilt,” says Delaney, “which can, in one moment, turn all the devices of vanity, all the memorials of excellence, all the securities of fame, into monuments of infamy.”

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Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 18:18". Joseph Benson's Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/2-samuel-18.html. 1857.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

No son. The sons mentioned above, chap. xiv. 27, were dead when this pillar was erected; unless we suppose he raised this pillar before they were born: (Challoner) or meant this pillar to perpetuate his memory, when they should be no more. (Josephus, [Antiquities?] vii. 9.) --- This author says that it was a pillar of marble; so that it is different from that which Doubdan (15) mentions, observing, that all who pass throw a stone at it. Thus was his vanity chastised! --- Hand, work. So Martial (viii. 51.) says of a vial! Mentoris hæc manus est an, Polyclete, tua? (Menochius) --- The same word is translated, triumphal arch, 1 Kings xv. 12. (G.[Calmet?])

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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 18:18". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/2-samuel-18.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

pillar. Marks ambition"s aim, while the heap of stones (2 Samuel 18:17) marks ambition"s end.

no son. Compare 2 Samuel 14:27. Therefore built, before the first-born; or after his sons (2 Samuel 14:27) were dead. place-monument. About a quarter of a mile east of Jerusalem, in the Valley of Jehoshaphat.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 18:18". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/2-samuel-18.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

Now Absalom in his lifetime had taken and reared up for himself a pillar, which is in the king's dale: for he said, I have no son to keep my name in remembrance: and he called the pillar after his own name: and it is called unto this day, Absalom's place.

Absalom in his life-time had ... reared up for himself a pillar, [ matsebet (Hebrew #4678), in the first clause, and yad (Hebrew #3027), hand, in the latter] - (see the notes at 1 Samuel 15:12.)

In the king's dale (cf. Genesis 14:17) - i:e., the valley of Jehoshaphat. This pillar was made of marble, according to Josephus ('Antiquities,' b. 7:, ch. 10:, sec. 3).

For he said, I have no son to keep my name in remembrance. It is elsewhere said that Absalom had three sons, and a daughter of great beauty, called Tamar (2 Samuel 14:27); but this pillar was in all likelihood raised previously to the appearance of this family; because Josephus expressly asserts that it was erected with the view of keeping alive his memory, even if he should have no children ('Antiquities,' b. 7:, ch. 10:, sec. 3). In the valley of Jehoshaphat, on the east of Jerusalem, is a tomb or cenotaph, said to be this "pillar" or monument: it is 24 feet square, dome-topped, and reaches 40 feet in height. This may occupy the spot, but cannot itself be the work of Absalom, as it evidently bears the style of a later architecture. It is substantially Doric, with an Ionin volute, and has been supposed to have been built about the time of the Maccabees (see Hardy's 'Notices of the Holy Land,' p. 137; Olin's 'Travels,' 2:, p. 145.) Some, however, maintain (Bonar's 'Land of Promise,' p. 132) that this is the very monument which Absalom constructed for himself, and that the architectural orders exhibited on it, and the other adjoining tombs, some Ionic, others Doric, were in a rude form found in Syria and Phoenicia, as well as in Egypt, long before they were imported into Greece, where they were carried to a high pitch of perfection.

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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 18:18". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/2-samuel-18.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(18) The king’s dale.—Called also in Genesis 14:17 “the valley of Shaveh.” Its site has not been identified, and writers differ as to whether it was near Jerusalem, in the valley of the Kidron, which seems probable, or was near the site of Sodom. On Absalom’s statement that he had no son, see note on 14:27.

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 18:18". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/2-samuel-18.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Now Absalom in his lifetime had taken and reared up for himself a pillar, which is in the king's dale: for he said, I have no son to keep my name in remembrance: and he called the pillar after his own name: and it is called unto this day, Absalom's place.
reared up
1 Samuel 15:12
the king's
Genesis 14:17
I have no son
14:27; Job 18:16,17; Psalms 109:13; Jeremiah 22:30
he called
Genesis 11:4; 1 Samuel 15:12; Psalms 49:11; Daniel 4:30
Absalom's place
Josephus says there was in his time, about two furlongs from Jerusalem, a marble pillar called Absalom's hand, as it is in the Hebrew, (See note on 1 Sa 15:12;) and there is one shown to the present day, in the valley of Jehoshaphat, which, though comparatively a modern structure, probably occupies the site of the original one set up by Absalom.
Genesis 11:9; Acts 1:18,19
Reciprocal: Genesis 4:17 - the name;  Genesis 28:18 - set it;  Genesis 35:20 - the pillar;  1 Chronicles 3:2 - Absalom;  Ecclesiastes 2:4 - made;  Ecclesiastes 3:5 - to cast;  Isaiah 22:16 - hewed

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Bibliographical Information
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 18:18". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/2-samuel-18.html.