Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

2 Samuel 2:1

Then it came about afterwards that David inquired of the Lord , saying, "Shall I go up to one of the cities of Judah?" And the Lord said to him, "Go up." So David said, "Where shall I go up?" And He said, "To Hebron."
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Armies;   David;   Hebron;   Judah;   Prayer;   Scofield Reference Index - Kingdom;   Thompson Chain Reference - Enquiring of God;   Hebron;   Inquiring of God;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Urim and Thummin;   Easton Bible Dictionary - David;   Hebron;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Abiathar;   Divination;   King;   Ziklag;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Abiathar;   David;   Samuel, Books of;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Abner;   Magic, Divination, and Sorcery;   Samuel, Books of;   Urim and Thummim;   The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Joab;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Abiathar;   Hebron;   Smith Bible Dictionary - Abi'athar;   Da'vid;   Divination;   Zik'lag;   Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Government of the Hebrews;  
Encyclopedias:
Condensed Biblical Cyclopedia - Hebrew Monarchy, the;   International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Inquire;   Samuel, Books of;   Urim and Thummim;   The Jewish Encyclopedia - Hebron;   Judah, Tribe of;   Urim and Thummim;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

David inquired of the Lord - By means of Abiathar the priest; for he did not know whether the different tribes were willing to receive him, though he was fully persuaded that God had appointed him king over Israel.

Unto Hebron - The metropolis of the tribe of Judah, one of the richest regions in Judea. The mountains of Hebron were famed for fruits, herbage, and honey; and many parts were well adapted for vines, olives, and different kinds of grain, abounding in springs of excellent water, as the most accurate travelers have asserted.

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Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 2:1". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/2-samuel-2.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Enquired of the Lord - Through Abiathar, the high priest. The death of Saul and Jonathan had entirely changed David‘s position, and therefore he needed divine guidance how to act under the new circumstances in which he was placed. Compare the marginal references.

Hebron was well suited for the temporary capital of David‘s kingdom, being situated in a strong position in the mountains of Judah, amidst David‘s friends, and withal having especially sacred associations (see the marginal references note). It appears to have also been the center of a district 2 Samuel 2:3.

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 2:1". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/2-samuel-2.html. 1870.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

DAVID BECAME KING OVER JUDAH;

ABNER PROCLAIMED SAUL'S SON AS KING OVER ALL ISRAEL;

CIVIL WAR ENSUED.

This chapter relates the beginning of David's long struggle to become king over all Israel. Of course, true to the prophecy of God, he eventually succeeded. And what a success that actually was!

"David took an insignificant nation, and within a few years, built it into a mighty kingdom. In the southwest, the Egyptian world empire had declined, and over in the east, the Assyrian and Babylonian world empires had not yet appeared. Here in Israel, on the highway between, under David, the kingdom of Israel, almost overnight, became not a world empire, but perhaps the most powerful single kingdom on earth at that time."[1]

This speaks only of his ultimate success, a success which did not come at once, and which involved many bloody events before it was finally realized. If one should inquire "Why did not God grant David such wonderful success immediately upon Saul's death, the answer is not far to seek. David himself was to blame. R. P. Smith has what we consider a perfectly reasonable explanation of this.

"If David had continued in Israel instead of moving to Gath and later to Ziklag as a vassal of the Philistine Achish, David might indeed have become king over all Israel at once. But he was too entangled with the Philistines and too much distrusted by the Northern Israel to be trusted by them."[2]

Had it not been for David's foolish and sinful alliance with Achish, he and his six hundred faithful men could easily have rescued all of Northern Israel from the Philistines, who following Saul's death, had quickly overrun all of the central districts of Northern Israel, and in fact, practically all of Palestine west of the Jordan river. This is indicated by the fact that Abner could find no place for Ishbosheth's capital except east of the Jordan.

It is Smith's opinion that had it not been for David's involvement with the Philistines and the consequent distrust of many Israelites, David could quickly have achieved the unity and rescue of all Israel, pointing out that:

"Detachments from the tribes of Gad and Manasseh, instead of joining Saul at Mount Gilboa, went to David at Ziklag (1 Chronicles 12); also a very large company from Benjamin and Judah under the command of David's nephew Amasa joined the forces of David. Thus, with all the disadvantages that David had brought upon himself through his Philistine involvement, his military strength continued to grow and became very great."[3]

The Scriptures report that, "From day to day men kept coming to David to help him, until there was a great army, like an army of God" (1 Chronicles 12:22).

Such events only stress how it might have been, but David's position was very precarious, loaded with all kinds of dangers. Oh yes, this chapter relates that the men of Judah anointed him king over Judah, but it is evident that, "This was done with the consent of the Philistines and with David's continued acceptance of his status as their vassal."[4]

If we should speculate on just why the Philistines allowed such an arrangement, we may suppose that they were happy indeed to see Israel divided into two hostile states with the inevitable war that was certain to develop.

In this very complicated and uncertain situation David did what every man of God should do; he consulted the will of the Lord, through the services of Abiathar and the Urim and Thummim.

DAVID INQUIRED OF THE LORD

"After this David inquired of the Lord, "Shall I go up into any of the cities of Judah"? And the Lord said to him, "Go up." And David said, "To which shall I go up"? And he said, "To Hebron." So David went up there, and his two wives also, Ahinoam of Jezreel, and Abigail the widow of Nabal of Carmel. And David brought up his men who were with him, every one with his household; and they dwelt in the towns of Hebron. And the men of Judah came, and there they anointed David king over the house of Judah."

"After this David inquired of the Lord" (2 Samuel 2:1). It is not recorded that David inquired of the Lord prior to his making that foolish flight to Achish at Gath; and, therefore, we may interpret the words "after this" which are found here as meaning that, "after the dangerous and complicated situation in which David realized he had maneuvered himself by NOT inquiring of the Lord, he now decided to do so."

"So David went up there (to Hebron)" (2 Samuel 2:2). This was an ideal place for the location of David's capital at that time. High in he mountains, it was relatively safe from the power of the Philistines whose chariots were not very effective in mountainous terrain. Additionally, it was a productive and very fruitful area and one of the major cities of Judah. Besides, it was very rich in historical and traditional significance, being also one of the cities of refuge designated by Joshua.

"And they dwelt in the towns of Hebron" (2 Samuel 2:3). This is a reference to the suburbs of Hebron. All ancient villages were understood as including the settlements surrounding the central metropolis.

"There they anointed David king over the house of Judah" (2 Samuel 2:4). There were three anointings of David as king:

(1) His first anointing was by Samuel (1 Samuel 10:1) which indicated God's secret purpose and ultimate intention.

(2) Here is the second anointing when the men of Judah elevated him over the house of Judah.

(3) His third and final anointing made him king "over all Israel" (1 Chronicles 14:8).

The delay between David's anointing and his ultimate assumption of the throne correspond in some degree with the four-year time interval between the anointing of Christ in his baptism and reception of the Holy Spirit and his reception of His Kingdom upon the occasion of His Ascension into heaven, which correspondence, "Seems to be thus typified,"[5] here.

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Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
Bibliographical Information
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 2:1". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/2-samuel-2.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

And it came to pass after this,.... After David had heard of the death of Saul and Jonathan, and made a lamentation over them, perhaps the next day; since David and his men are only said to mourn, and weep, and fast till even, 2 Samuel 1:10,

that David inquired of the Lord; of the Word of the Lord, as the Targum, by Abiathar the priest, and through the Urim and Thummim, in the ephod he had put on on this occasion:

saying, shall I go up into any of the cities of Judah? though the Lord had promised him the kingdom, and he had been anointed by Samuel by his appointment, yet he was not hasty to take it into his hands, but was desirous of acting according to the will of God, and by his direction, and wait his time when and where he should go and take possession of it; he mentions Judah because it was his own tribe, and where he had the most friends:

and the Lord said unto him, go up; from Ziklag into the tribe of Judah, but did not mention any particular place whither he should go; hence another question was put:

and David said, whither shall I go up? To what town or city in the tribe of Judah? whether Jerusalem or any other?

And he said, unto Hebron; a city of the priests, a city of refuge, Joshua 21:13, twenty miles from Jerusalem, or more, which is not directed to, because it was then chiefly in the hands of the Jebusites, and because, as Procopius Gazaeus says, Hebron was now the metropolis of Judah.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 2:1". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/2-samuel-2.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

And it came to pass after this, that David a enquired of the LORD, saying, Shall I go up into any of the cities of Judah? And the LORD said unto him, Go up. And David said, Whither shall I go up? And he said, Unto b Hebron.

(a) By means of the high priest, (1 Samuel 23:2) ; (2 Samuel 5:19).

(b) Which was also called Kirjatharba (Joshua 14:15).

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Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 2:1". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/2-samuel-2.html. 1599-1645.

Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary

CONTENTS

This chapter contains the relation of David's accession to the throne of Hebron, A party however is formed by Abner the Captain of Saul's host, in favour of Ish-bosheth, Saul's son; which became the source of a long contention between the house of David and the house of Saul. David reigns in Hebron, and Ish-bosheth in Mahanaim.

2 Samuel 2:1

(1) ¶ And it came to pass after this, that David enquired of the LORD, saying, Shall I go up into any of the cities of Judah? And the LORD said unto him, Go up. And David said, Whither shall I go up? And he said, Unto Hebron.

If the Reader will again, in this chapter, consult 1 Chronicles 12:23 to the end, he will there discover the means, under God, by which David's kingdom became established. David consulted God after the death of Saul, what steps he should take, as this verse relates. Oh! how sweet and profitable it is to do so in everything. Reader! do turn to those two precious verses, and endeavor to keep them in your memory, for the mind to turn upon all occasions of your life: I mean, Isaiah 42:16 and Proverbs 3:6.

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Hawker, Robert, D.D. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 2:1". "Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pmc/2-samuel-2.html. 1828.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

And it came to pass after this, that David enquired of the LORD, saying, Shall I go up into any of the cities of Judah? And the LORD said unto him, Go up. And David said, Whither shall I go up? And he said, Unto Hebron.

Enquired — By Urim. Thus David begins at the right end, and lays his foundation in God's counsel and assistance.

Shall I go — He asked not whether he should take the kingdom; for that was appointed before; and he would not offend God, nor dishonour his ordinance with unnecessary enquiries; but only where he should enter upon it; whether in Judah, as he supposed, because of his relation to that tribe, and his interest in it; or in some other tribe: for he doth not limit God, but resolves exactly to follow his counsels.

Hebron — Which was next to Jerusalem (part whereof the Jebusites now possessed) the chief city of that tribe, and a city of the priests, and in the very center of that tribe, to which the whole tribe might speedily resort, when need required. And the sepulchres of the patriarchs adjoining to Hebron, would remind him of the ancient promise.

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Wesley, John. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 2:1". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/2-samuel-2.html. 1765.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

2 Samuel 2:1 And it came to pass after this, that David enquired of the LORD, saying, Shall I go up into any of the cities of Judah? And the LORD said unto him, Go up. And David said, Whither shall I go up? And he said, Unto Hebron.

Ver. 1. And it came to pass after this.] And after that many worthies out of several tribes had resorted unto him at Ziklag, so that he had a very great host, like the host of God. [1 Chronicles 12:1-22 Job 25:3]

Shall I go up into any of the cities of Judah?] Ziklag was a city of Judah, but not so fit for his purpose: because it was in the utmost borders, and now also held by the gift of the king of the Philistines, who at this time were so overruled by God, that after their victory over Saul, they stirred not against David, till, settled in the whole kingdom, he was well able to deal with them.

And he said, Unto Hebron.] An ancient and metropolitan city of Judah; where the patriarchs, to whom the land was promised, lay buried; and thereby held possession, as it were.

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 2:1". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/2-samuel-2.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

2 Samuel 2:1. And he said, Unto Hebron Though God had appointed David to the kingdom, he would not pretend to take upon him the administration of affairs without immediately applying himself to him, by Abiathar the high-priest, to know when and by what means he should best be put into possession of it. He was directed by God to go up to Hebron, which was situated in the midst of the tribe of Judah, on the top of a ridge of high mountains, equally famed for fruits, herbage, and honey. Mr. Sandys seems to have surveyed the whole region round it with uncommon rapture; and Dr. Shaw has considered it with singular care and attention. He observes of that region, that it is admirably fitted for olives and vineyards, and in many parts for grain and pasture. It seems, therefore, to be a region peculiarly adapted to the reception of David and his men; for there they might then dwell, as Dr. Shaw tells us the inhabitants do now, in greater numbers, and with greater advantage: for here, says he, they themselves have bread to the full, while their cattle browse upon a richer herbage; and both of them are refreshed by springs of excellent water. Besides this, Hebron had also other advantages; it was a Levitical, priestly, and patriarchal city; venerable for the sepulchres of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob, and, as tradition adds, of Adam also; and upon all these accounts, long reputed (as it is at this day, even by the Turks) holy, and honoured with the title chosen or beloved. God had before appointed it for the residence of his favourite servants, and it was now peculiarly proper for the reception of David, as being the metropolis of his tribe. See Numbers 13:22. Joshua 14:13.

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Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 2:1". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/2-samuel-2.html. 1801-1803.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

2 SAMUEL CHAPTER 2

David, by God’s direction, with his company goeth up to Hebron, where he is made king of Judah, 2 Samuel 2:1-4. He commendeth them of Jabesh-gilead for burying Saul, 2 Samuel 2:5-7. Abner maketh Ish-bosheth king of Israel, 2 Samuel 2:8-11. A mortal fight between twelve of Abner’s and twelve of Joab’s men, 2 Samuel 2:12-17. Asahel pursueth Abner, and is slain by him, 2 Samuel 2:18-24. At Abner’s motion Joab soundeth a retreat, 2 Samuel 2:25-31. Asahel’s burial, 2 Samuel 2:32.

David inquired of the Lord, by Urim, as 1 Samuel 23:6,9 30:7,8. Thus David begins at the right end, and lays his foundation in God’s counsel and assistance, which now he seeks. He asketh not whether he should take the kingdom, for that was appointed and known before; and he would not offend God, nor dishonour his ordinance, with frivolous and unnecessary inquiries; but only where he should enter upon it; whether in Judah, as he supposed, because of his relation to that tribe, and his interest in it; or whether in some other tribe; for he doth not limit God, but resolves exactly to follow his counsels. Unto Hebron; which was next to Jerusalem, (part whereof the Jebusites now possessed,) the chief city of that tribe, and a city of the priests, Joshua 21:10, &c., and in the very centre or middle of that tribe, to which the whole tribe might speedily resort, when need required.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on 2 Samuel 2:1". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/2-samuel-2.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

DAVID KING IN HEBRON, AND ISHBOSHETH KING IN MAHANAIM, 2 Samuel 2:1-11.

1.After this — After his lamentation over the death of Saul and Jonathan.

Inquired of the Lord — By the urim of the priest Abiathar. Compare 1 Samuel 23:9-12.

Shall I go up — David knew that he was to be king, but how to attain the throne he knew not. He had no unholy ambition, and in matters of so great responsibility he wished Jehovah to guide him.

Hebron — The ancient city of the patriarchs. See on Genesis 13:18, and Joshua 10:3. It was inexpedient for David longer to abide in the land of the Philistines, and Hebron, because of its peculiarly sacred associations and its central position in the tribe of Judah, was a most appropriate place for David to begin his reign. But it should be observed that, though he received divine counsel to go up to Hebron, he was not divinely advised to receive the kingdom from a single tribe. See note on 2 Samuel 2:4.

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 2:1". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/2-samuel-2.html. 1874-1909.

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

2 Samuel 2:1. David inquired of the Lord — By Urim. When he had given a due time to his grief and mourning for Saul and Jonathan, he applied himself to God, who had appointed him to the kingdom, to know by what means he should best be put in possession of it. He did not inquire whether he should take the kingdom; for God had already signified his appointment of that, and David would not offend him nor dishonour his ordinance by unnecessary inquiries; but only where and at what time he should enter upon it; whether in Judah, as he supposed, because of his relation to that tribe and his interest in it, or in some other tribe; for he does not limit God, but resolves exactly to follow his instructions. Thus David begins at the right end, and lays his foundation in God’s counsel and assistance. Thus, in all our affairs, we ought to apply to God by prayer and supplication for his direction and aid.

He said, Unto Hebron — Which, next to Jerusalem, (part whereof the Jebusites now possessed,) was the chief city of the tribe of Judah, a city of the priests, and situated in the very centre of that tribe, to which all the people might speedily resort when need required. It stood on the top of a ridge of high mountains, equally famed for fruits, herbage, and honey. According to Mr. Sandys, who seems to have surveyed the whole region round it with uncommon rapture, and the very learned and accurate Dr. Shaw, who also considered it with singular care and attention, it was not only delightfully pleasant, but admirably fitted for olives and vineyards, and in many parts for grain and pasture. It seems therefore to have been a region peculiarly fitted for the reception of David and his men, with less inconvenience to the country than in most other places; for here they might have bread to the full, and be refreshed with springs of excellent water. Add to this, that it was a patriarchal city, venerable for the sepulchres of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob, which would remind David of the ancient promises. See Delaney and Shaw’s Travels.

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Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 2:1". Joseph Benson's Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/2-samuel-2.html. 1857.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Juda. David thought it was his duty to co-operate with the designs of Providence. He consults the Lord (Calmet) by means of Abiathar, (Abulensis) or by a prophet. (Josephus) --- Hebron, ennobled by the patriarchs. (Menochius) --- It was also in the centre of Juda, and the strongest place belonging to that tribe. (Calmet) --- Part of Jerusalem was still in the hands of the Jebusites. (Haydock)

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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 2:1". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/2-samuel-2.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

enquired. Probably by Urim and Thummim, in the breastplate of Abiathar the High Priest, who was with David (1 Samuel 22:20).

the LORD. Hebrew. Jehovah. App-4.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 2:1". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/2-samuel-2.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

And it came to pass after this, that David inquired of the LORD, saying, Shall I go up into any of the cities of Judah? And the LORD said unto him, Go up. And David said, Whither shall I go up? And he said, Unto Hebron.

David inquired of the Lord - by Urim (1 Samuel 23:6; 1 Samuel 23:9; 1 Samuel 30:7-8). He knew his destination, but he knew also that the providence of God would pave the way, and therefore would take no step in such a crisis of his own and the nation's history without asking and obtaining the divine direction. He was told to go into Judah and fix his headquarters in Hebron, whither he accordingly repaired with his family and two wives. (Polygamy was tolerated in Hebrew society, but interdicted to the king (Deuteronomy 17:17); and David's adoption of that practice, by the establishment of a harem, like Oriental princes, sowed the seeds of disorder and disunion in his household, which produced a rank harvest of bitter fruit in afterlife.) There his interests were very powerful; because he was not only within his own tribe, and near chiefs with whom he had been long in friendly relations (see the note at 1 Samuel 30:26-31), but Hebron was the capital and center of Judah, and one of the Levitical cities hallowed by patriarchal memories, as well as by its being the special inheritance of Caleb.

Moreover, the inhabitants of Hebron were strongly attached to him, both from sympathy with his cause, ever since the massacre at Nob, and from the prospect of realizing in his person their promised pre-eminence among the tribes. The princes or elders, representatives of Judah, therefore, offered him the crown, to reign over their tribe, and it was accepted; so that forthwith he was "anointed king over the house of Judah," whether by the instrumentality of Abiathar, or of some other, as Samuel the prophet (1 Samuel 10:1), is not said. Psalms 27:1-14 refers to this period, if the title prefixed by the Septuagint [Pro tou christheenai, before the anointing-namely, at Hebron] be correct.

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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 2:1". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/2-samuel-2.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(1) Enquired of the Lord.—At this important juncture of affairs, David’s first care is to know the Divine will. His inquiry was, doubtless, made through the high priest Abiathar, as in 1 Samuel 23:9-10 (comp. 2 Samuel 22:20; 2 Samuel 23:1; 2 Samuel 23:4). The answer definitely directed him to go up to Hebron.

Hebron is one of the most ancient cities of the world (built “seven years before Zoan in Egypt,” Numbers 13:22), long the residence of Abraham (Genesis 13:18), and the place where he and Sarah, Isaac and Jacob, were buried. Its original name was Kirjath-arba (Genesis 23:2; Joshua 14:15, &c). It is situated in a valley among the hills of Southern Judea, at a height of nearly 3,000 feet above the Mediterranean. It is about twenty miles S.S.W. from Jerusalem, somewhat more than this N.E. of Beersheba, and about fifteen miles E.S.E. of the Philistine town of Gath. From Ziklag, where David had been living, it was distant about thirty-eight miles. It has always been famous for its vineyards, and its grapes are still considered the finest in Southern Palestine. The valley in which it is situated is probably the “valley of Eshcol,” from which the spies brought the great “cluster of grapes” to Moses in the wilderness (Numbers 13:23). It was a priestly city (Joshua 21:10-11), and the most southerly of the cities of refuge (Joshua 20:7). Here was the home and the throne of David for the next seven and a half years (2 Samuel 2:11; 2 Samuel 5:5). The larger part of the land, since the recent defeat, was in the power of the Philistines; and Hebron, on account of its situation at the far south, and its strategical strength, as well as its sacred associations, was a peculiarly fitting place for the beginning of David’s reign.

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 2:1". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/2-samuel-2.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

And it came to pass after this, that David enquired of the LORD, saying, Shall I go up into any of the cities of Judah? And the LORD said unto him, Go up. And David said, Whither shall I go up? And he said, Unto Hebron.
enquired
5:19,23; Numbers 27:21; Judges 1:1; 1 Samuel 23:2,4,9-12; 30:7,8; Psalms 25:4,5; Psalms 27:4; 143:8; Proverbs 3:5,6; Ezekiel 36:37
Hebron
11; 5:1-3; 15:7; Genesis 32:2; Numbers 13:22; Joshua 14:14,15; 1 Samuel 30:31; 1 Kings 2:11; 1 Chronicles 29:7
Reciprocal: Genesis 35:27 - Mamre;  Joshua 9:14 - asked not;  Joshua 21:11 - is Hebron;  2 Samuel 15:10 - Hebron;  1 Chronicles 11:1 - Hebron;  1 Chronicles 14:10 - inquired;  2 Chronicles 18:4 - Inquire

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 2:1". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/2-samuel-2.html.