Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

2 Samuel 23:5

"Truly is not my house so with God? For He has made an everlasting covenant with me, Ordered in all things, and secured; For all my salvation and all my desire, Will He not indeed make it grow?
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Covenant;   David;   Faith;   God;   Psalms;   Thompson Chain Reference - Covenant;   Covenants and Vows;   Everlasting;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Covenant, the;   Trust;  
Dictionaries:
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Covenant;   David;   King;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Covenant;   King, Kingship;   Psalms, Theology of;   Samuel, First and Second, Theology of;   Easton Bible Dictionary - David;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Samuel, the Books of;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Covenant;   Poetry;   Samuel, Books of;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Giant;   Ithrite, the;   Samuel, Books of;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Israel, Israelite;   Pre-Eminence ;   The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Covenant;   Eternal;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Samuel first and second books of;   Smith Bible Dictionary - Da'vid;  
Encyclopedias:
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Christ, Offices of;   David;   Psalms, Book of;   Samuel, Books of;   The Jewish Encyclopedia - Covenant;   Poetry;  
Devotionals:
Daily Light on the Daily Path - Devotion for August 14;   Faith's Checkbook - Devotion for August 30;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

Although my house be not so with God - Instead of כן ken, so, read כן kun, established; and let the whole verse be considered as an interrogation, including a positive assertion; and the sense will be at once clear and consistent: "for is not my house (family) established with God; because he hath made with me an everlasting covenant, ordered in all, and preserved? For this (He) is all my salvation, and all my desire, although he make it (or him) not to spring up." All is sure relative to my spiritual successor, though he do not as yet appear; the covenant is firm, and it will spring forth in due time. See the observations at the end of the chapter, 2 Samuel 23:39;note).

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Bibliographical Information
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 23:5". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/2-samuel-23.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Although my house … - The sense of this clause (according to the the King James Version) will be that David comparing the actual state of his family and kingdom during the later years of trouble and disaster with the prophetic description of the prosperity of the righteous king, and seeing how far it falls short, comforts himself by the terms of God‘s covenant 2 Samuel 7:12-16 and looks forward to Messiah‘s kingdom. The latter clause, “although he make it not to grow,” must then mean that, although at the present time the glory of his house was not made to grow, yet all his salvation and all his desire was made sure in the covenant which would be fulfilled in due time. But most modern commentators understand both clauses as follows: “Is not my house so with God that He has made with me an everlasting covenant,” etc.? “For all my salvation and all my desire, will He not cause it to spring up?” namely, in the kingdom of Solomon, and still more fully in the kingdom of Christ.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Bibliographical Information
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 23:5". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/2-samuel-23.html. 1870.

The Biblical Illustrator

2 Samuel 23:5

Although my house be not so with God.

David’s sorrow and resource

The great and elevated among mankind have sorrows proportioned to their greatness, as the highest points of earth are most exposed to the fury of the fiercest storms. Kings have their griefs as kings.

I. David’s domestic sorrow: “My house is not so with God.” Many were the occasions when this distinguished man had to say: “The sorrows of my heart are enlarged: bring thou me out of my distresses. All Thy waves and Thy billows are gone over me. I sink in deep waters” (2 Samuel 22:5-6.) Probably as a king, as a public man, David more habitually and simply cast himself upon the Lord. As a domestic man, he was less upon his guard. He expected no lion, no bear, no Goliath difficulty in his home; he therefore did not meet home temptations and troubles as he had met them: “I come to Thee in the name of the Lord of hosts.” And some of you may now be drinking of a similar cup of domestic bitters.

II. Let us look at David’s personal resource: “Yet hath he made with me an everlasting covenant.”

1. In duration it is everlasting. From everlasting the counsel of peace was between them both--the Father and the Son; the Son, who as Messiah was to sit and rule upon His throne, and be a priest upon His throne (Zechariah 6:13.) It is that covenant, which, to use the forcible language of Paul to Titus, “God, who cannot lie, promised in Christ before the world began.”

2. Observe its completeness: “Ordered in all things: This is all my salvation, and all my desire.” Nothing is left to captious chance; nothing to inconstant and changeable man. There are no contingencies with God; nothing takes Him by surprise.

3. Look also at its certainty: “Sure.” The uncertainty of all earthly things is one sad ingredient in the cup of earth’s bitterness. Such was David’s personal resource at seventy, amidst domestic sorrow. And when we look at the sufficiency: of it, we may well ask, What has the man of the world to fall back upon, when all his earthly hopes are blighted; what to be compared with the believer’s resource? (J. East, M. A.)

David’s dying song

How many choice thoughts have we gained in the bedchamber of the righteous, beloved? I remember one sweet idea; which I once won from a death-bed. A dying man desired to have one of the Psalms read to him, and the 17th being chosen, he stopped at the 6th verse, “Incline thine ear unto me and hear my speech,” and faintly whispering, said, “Ah, Lord, I cannot speak, my voice fails me; incline Thine ear, put it against my mouth, that Thou mayest hear me.” None but a weak and dying man, whose life was ebbing fast, could have conceived such a thought. It is well to hear saints’ words when they are near heaven--when they stand upon the banks of Jordan. But here is a special case, for these be the last words of David.

I. The Psalmist says he had sorrow in his house. “Although my house be not so with God.” What man is there of all our race, who, if he had to write his history, would not need to use a great many “althoughs?” If you read the biography of any man, as recorded in the Sacred Word, you will always find a “but,” or an “although,” before you have finished. Naaman was a mighty man of valour, and s great man with his master, but he was a leper. There is always a “but” in every condition, a crook in every lot, some dark tint upon the marble pillar, some cloud in the summer sky, some discord in the music, some alloy in the gold. So David, though a man who had been raised from the sheepfold, a mighty warrior, a conqueror of giants, a king over a great nation, yet had his “althoughs,” and the “although” which he had was one in his own house.

1. But I imagine that the principal meaning of these words of David refers to his family--his children. David had many trials in his children. It has often been the lot of good men to have great troubles from their sons and daughters.

2. What must I say to any of those who are thus tried and distressed in estate and family? First, let me say to you, it is necessary that you should have an “although” in your lot, because if you had not, you know what you would do; you would build a very downy nest on earth, and there you would 1ie down in sleep; so God puts a thorn in your nest in order that you may sing. It is said by the old writers that the nightingale never sang so sweetly as when she sat among thorns, since say they, the thorns prick her breast, and remind her of her song. So it may be with you. Ye, like the larks, would sleep in your nest did not some trouble pass by and affright you; then you stretch your wings, and carolling the matin song, rise to greet the sun. Trials are sent to wean you from the world; bitters are put into your drink, that ye may learn to live upon the dew of heaven: the food of earth is mingled with gall, that ye may only seek: for true bread in the manna which droppeth from the sky. Your soul without trouble would be as the sea if it were without tide or motion; it would become foul and obnoxious. But, furthermore, recollect this, O thou who art tried in thy children--that prayer can remove thy troubles. There is not a pious father or mother here, who is suffering in the family, but may have that trial taken sway yet. Faith is as omnipotent as God Himself, for it moves the arm which leads the stars along.

II. David had confidence in the covenant. Oh! how sweet it is to look from the dulness of earth to the brilliancy of heaven! How glorious it is to leap from the ever tempest-tossed bark of this world, and stand upon the terra-firma of the covenant! So did David. Having done with his “Although,” he then puts in a blessed “yet.” Oh! it is a “yet,” with jewels set: “He hath made with me an everlasting covenant, ordered in all things, and sure.”

1. David rejoiced in the covenant, because it is Divine in its origin. “Yet hath He made with me an everlasting covenant.”

2. But notice its particular application. “Yet hath He made with me an everlasting covenant.” Here lies the sweetness-of it to me, as an individual.

3. Furthermore, this covenant is not only Divine in its origin, but it is everlasting in its duration.

4. But notice the next word. “It is ordered in all things.” “Order is heaven’s first law,” and God has not a disorderly covenant. It is an orderly one. When He planned it, before the world began, it was in all things ordered well.

5. That word things is not in the original, and we may read it persons, as well as things. It is ordered in all persons--all the persons whose names are in the covenant; it is ordered for them, and they shall come according to the promise: “All that the Father giveth me shall come to me; and him that cometh to Me I will in no wise cast out.”

6. To wind up our description of this covenant, it is sure. We cannot call anything “sure” on earth; the only place where we can write that word is on the covenant, which is “ordered in all things and sure.”

III. The Psalmist had a satisfaction in his heart. “This is,” he said, “all my salvation, and all my desire.”

1. He is satisfied with his salvation.

2. Then, the Psalmist says, he has all his desire. There is nought that can fill the heart of man except the Trinity. God has made man’s heart a triangle. Men have been for centuries trying to make the globe fill the triangle, but they cannot do it; it is the Trinity alone that can fill a triangle, as old Quarles well says. There is no way of getting satisfaction but by gaining Christ, getting heaven, winning glory, getting the covenant, for the word covenant comprises all the other things. “All my desire”--says the Psalmist. (C. H. Spurgeon.)

The everlasting covenant, the believer’s support under distress

Now there are three parts of this last prophecy of David:, The first of them concerns the subject of all prophecy and promises, that he had preached about and declared, and that is Christ himself, in the third and fourth verses. The second of them concerns himself, as he was a type of Christ (2 Samuel 23:5.) The third part concerns Satan and the enemies of the Church, in opposition unto the kingdom of Jesus Christ.

I. A great surprisal and disappointment; “Although my house be not so with God.” I have looked that it should be otherways, saith he, that my house should have a great deal of glory, especially that my house should be upright with God; but I begin to see it will be otherwise. The best of the saints of God do oftentimes meet with great surprisals and disappointments in the best of their earthly comforts: their houses are not so with God. The reasons hereof why it may be thus, are:

1. Because there is no promise of the covenant to the contrary. There is no promise of God secures absolutely unto us our outward comforts, be they of what nature they will, be they in our relations, in our enjoyments, in our persons, of what kind they will, why yet we may have a surprisal befal them in reference to them all; because there is no promise of God to secure the contrary, therefore it may be so.

2. Sometimes it is needful it should be so, though we are apt to think the contrary; and that for these three reasons:

That which we should learn from hence, by way of use, is:

1. Not to put too great a value upon any contentment whatever we have in this world, lest God make us write an “although” upon it.

2. Let us be in an expectation of such changes of Providence, that they may not be great surprisals unto us.

II. That the great reserve and relief for believers, under their surprisals and distresses, lies, in betaking themselves to the covenant of God, or to God in His covenant. “Although my house be not so with God.” Why do they so?

1. They do it because of the author of the covenant.

2. The second reason is taken from the properties of the covenant; what kind of one it is: and they are three. It is an everlasting covenant. His a covenant that is ordered in all things. And it is a covenant that is sure.

He hath undertaken two things.

There is an addition of order, in reference to the matter of it, here expressed.

The springs of the security of this covenant are two:

1. The oath of God;

2. The intercession of Christ. (J. Owen, D. D.)

Household religion

Last words of dying David. As the dying are sometimes visited with a wave of physical strength to which they were strangers in life, so often in death the believer is blessed with a mental and spiritual vision, he rises to a state of exultation in which he feels, sees, comprehends things altogether beyond his usual ken. “At evening-time there” is often marvellous “light” for the child of God. To King David it took the form of a vision of the ideal King that one day should arise (see marg. R.V.) No contemporary suggested it, no history fanned a recollection; it was an inspiration of God. (2 Samuel 23:2.) Nothing else was sufficient to explain how a warrior of those brutal days came to conceive of a kingdom that should be as morning light after darkness. Not even yet has a kingdom of earth appeared that might be so described. Where is the realm to-day whose working-classes, e.g., would say it was as “a morning without clouds?” David, like Abraham, saw afar off the day of Christ. Then, turning from the vision of the ideal future to the actual present, the bitter confession of the text is made.

I. We have here the confession of the disappointed idealist. Compared with others, David, easily first of the kings, gave peace from enemies round about, established religion, and by his hymns and personal character made it popular, and made internal order and justice sure. The secret of his success was the secret of his acknowledgment of failure, viz., that he had a very lofty standard which he felt he had failed to reach. The explanation of many a believer’s depression, and of many an earnest worker’s discouragement.

II. We have here the confession of the disappointed Godly parent. We know what had happened in the matter of Absalom, and what subsequently transpired between Adonijah and Solomon. Coming events which cast their shadows before upon the dying father’s heart. He saw there was no likelihood that the ideal he had failed to attain would be attained by any of his house. And this, although a father’s hope will linger longer than anyone’s respecting his children. We have then, here a dying father’s pillow stuffed with thorns because his family is not right “with God.” In the dying hour it is our own kith and kin we want around us--fortune, fame, etc., are of little moment--and if believers ourselves the all-consuming anxiety is how do they stand “with God?” What explanations or warnings may we get from David’s instance?

David’s distress, consolation, and experience

I. A depth of distress. “My house,” says David, “is not so with God.” He had many trials; but with regard to the affliction before us, we may observe two things; that it was domestic; and that it was principally, though not entirely, of a moral nature.

II. An all-sufficiency of consolation. “Although my house is not so with God.”

1. And first it tells us that this “covenant” is everlasting. Its counsels and its contrivances were from eternity.

2. Secondly, he tells us that this “everlasting covenant” is ordered in all things. Nothing in it is left to any contingency, nothing left to the intermeddlings of men.

3. Thirdly, he tells us that this “covenant ordered in all things” is sure. The covenant of works made with Adam was soon destroyed; the national covenant of the Jews was soon destroyed; and the people, dispersed over the face of the earth, remain to this day a proverb and a by-word. But this covenant is unchangeable; it is as sure, as the truth of God, as the faithfulness of God can make it.

4. Fourthly, the importance he attached to it. “It is all my salvation,” says he. All my salvation requires to be done is here, and all my salvation requires to be given is here. And how much is required? Is the pardon of our sins necessary? There it is. Is holiness necessary? There it is. Is strength necessary? He will put strength in us. Is grace necessary? This covenant gives it. Is glory necessary? It provides it. Is God necessary Himself, with all His relations and attributes? This is the grand provision in the covenant--“I will be their God, and they shall be My people.” They have all of them a God, each a God for himself; a God to guide them, a God to guard them, a God to supply all their need from His riches in glory by Christ Jesus.

5. He tells us also of the love he bare to it. It is “all my desire.” What can I wish for besides?

III. An instructive experience.

1. This experience of David calls upon you, in the first place, and says, see what variations there are in the views and the feelings even of the Godly. If it is now dab, with them, the day is neither clear nor dark, as Zechariah says, it is a mixture of both. Every thing with regard to them now is a chequered scene. The image of the Church now may be a bush burning with fire, and not consumed; and the motto of the Church should be, “Perplexed, but not ill despair; cast, down, but not destroyed.”

2. This experience admonishes you, in the next place, and says, do not look for too much here. There are some persons, who idolize life; but after all, what is it found to be? In what condition, and at what period of it, does it effectually belie the language of Young, who says that, for solid happiness--

“Too low they build who build beneath the stars?”

They are “walking in a vain show,” they are “disquieting themselves in vain;” they are seeking the living among the dead.

3. This experience admonishes you how to improve your afflictions; and how to render them, not only harmless, but even beneficial. And this will be the ease, when, like David, we are turned towards Him, and ask, “Where is God my Maker, who giveth songs in the night?” “Though no affliction for the present is joyous, but grievous, nevertheless afterward it yieldeth the peaceable fruit of righteousness unto them that are exercised thereby.” The ploughman is not angry with the ground; but he drives the ploughshare through it to prepare it for the reception of the seed. The husbandman is not angry with the vine; but he cuts it, and prunes it, in order that it may bring forth more fruit. As constantly as the ox is in the field of labour, he must have the yoke on; and Jeremiah compares affliction to a yoke, and says, “It is good for a man to bear the yoke.” Let but the Lord impose it upon us, and it will sit easy, and it will bear well.

4. This experience of David admonishes you not to cherish discontent, nor to dwell principally on the dark side of your condition, but to cherish cheerfulness, to look on the bright side.

5. What you are principally to derive from this experience is to see what resources genuine Godliness has. From what you have heard, you learn that it-does not exempt; its votaries from afflictions; but then, you see, it sustains them under those afflictions; it turns them, at least, into a blessing. (W. Jay.)

The covenant of grace, a support under sorrow

Standing on the borders of the eternal world, David looks back to his humble original, and blesses that goodness Which God had displayed to him, in elevating him to eminence both in the Church and the state.

I. Even the children of God, those who are within the bonds of His covenant, may have to contend with domestic afflictions, may have to lament their errors and their falls, and must be extended on the bed of death.

II. The nature of this covenant. It was primarily made with the glorious Redeemer, as the head and surety of believers; but it is also made with all those who, by faith, accept that Saviour who has ratified it with His blood, and who make of this covenant thus sealed, “all their salvation and all their desire.”

1. It is everlasting; it is, in the language of the apostle, “The eternal purpose which the Father purposed in Christ Jesus our Lord.” All the manifestations of it in time, and all the blessings which constantly flow from it, are only the accomplishment of the gracious designs that were formed infinite ages before a creature lived.

2. It is “ordered in all things;” planned and arranged by Him whose knowledge is infinite, and whose wisdom is unerring; by Him rendered so comprehensive that “all things,” all possible exigencies, all conceivable events that can befall the Christian, are provided for; every difficulty, every trial, every, tear, and every struggle, were foreseen; together with the effects to be produced by them.

3. This covenant is sure. If there be any truth in the promise and in the oath of Jehovah; if there be any strength in that mighty Redeemer, who is its surety, or any virtue in that blood which sealed it, then those who have a personal interest, in it, may triumph in the stability of their hopes. (H: Kollock, D. D.)

A sure covenant

I. The description which he gives of this great covenant.

1. The time it is to last. It is “an everlasting covenant”--strictly everlasting--never, never to expire.

2. The completeness of its arrangements. It is “ordered in all things, and sure.” The covenants of men are often very incomplete. Something, perhaps, hath been forgotten or lost sight of in the drawing of them up, which makes them almost good for nothing to the parties they are made with. Some case, some circumstance, is unprovided for, which, as soon as it occurs, makes the covenant of none effect. Not so in respect of the covenant of grace made with sinners through a Saviour. No, that is all complete in its provisions. Complete in reference to God’s requirements. For it satisfies His justice; it fulfils His truth; it displays His holiness; it magnifies His love; it sets forth His wisdom; it commends His mercy; it shows forth at once all His glorious perfections, and puts a song of praise into the lips of men and angels. And it is complete, again: in reference to man; nothing, nothing is there wanting in the salvation of Christ Jesus to make it everything poor sinners want.

II. The interest which David states himself to have in this everlasting covenant. “God hath made it,” saith he, “with me.” He had an assurance, then, that he was personally interested in this covenant. He could lay his hand on it and call it his--a covenant made particularly with himself. And, brethren, there is little comfort otherwise. It is a poor thing to look upon salvation, and to say, “This and that man have a part in it. The comfort is when we can bring it nearer home; when we can think, upon good grounds, “I have a share in it.”

III. David’s fillings.

1. “All my salvation.” Why that, in other words, is to tell us that he could most comfortably rest upon it, rest upon it altogether.

2. “This,” saith he, this everlasting covenant of grace, “is all my desire.” (A. Roberts, M. A.)

Consolations of the covenant of grace

“Yet” this little word “yet” wraps up a great and sovereign cordial in it. “Though Amnon, Absalom, and Adonijah be gone, and gone with many smarting aggravations too; yet hath He made with me a covenant; yet I have this sheet anchor left to secure me: God’s covenant with me, in relation to Christ, this under-props and shores up my heart. As all the rivers run into the sea, and there is the congregation of all the waters; so all the promises and comforts of the Gospel are gathered into the covenant of grace, and there is the congregation of all the sweet streams of refreshment, that are dispersed throughout the Scriptures. The covenant is the storehouse of promises, the shop of cordials and rare elixirs, to revive us in all our faintings; though, alas, most men know no more what are t, heir virtues or where to find them, than an illiterate rustic put into an apothecary’s shop. (Flavel.)

Divine covenant compensates earthly disappointment

It is wise, when we are disappointed in one thing, to set over against it a hopeful expectancy of another, like the farmer who said, “If the peas don’t pay, let us hope the beans will.” Yet it would be idle to patch up one rotten expectation with another of like character, for that would, only make the rent worse. It is better to turn from the fictions of the sanguine worldling to the facts of the believer in the Word of the Lord. Then, if we find no profit in our trading with earth, we shall fall back upon our heart’s treasure in heaven. We may lose our gold, but we can never lose our God. The expectation of the righteous is from the Lord, and nothing that comes from Him shall ever fail.

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Bibliographical Information
Exell, Joseph S. "Commentary on "2 Samuel 23:5". The Biblical Illustrator. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tbi/2-samuel-23.html. 1905-1909. New York.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Although my house be not so with God,.... So bright, and flourishing, and prosperous as the government of the just ruler before described; or is not "right"F13לא כן "non recta", Cocceius. with God, meaning his family, in which great sins were committed, and great disorders and confusions brought into it, as the cases of Amnon, Absalom, and Adonijah showed; or "not firm" or "stable"F14"Non est re firma", Vitringa in Jesaiam, c. xi. 1. , through the rebellion of one, the insurrection of another, and the usurpation of a third; yet he believed it would be firm and stable in the Messiah that should spring from him, promised in the everlasting covenant; though the Jewish writers understand this of the firmness and stability of his kingdom and government: "but my house is not so", &c. like the morning light, which increases by little and little, and like the morning, which sometimes is not cloudy, and sometimes is; sometimes the sun shines clearly, and sometimes not; or like the tender grass, which is sometimes flourishing, and after withers; but so is not my kingdom, it is a perpetual one, given and secured by an everlasting covenant; and such certainly is or will be the kingdom of the Messiah:

yet he hath made with me an everlasting covenant, ordered in all things, and sure; or, "forF15כי "quia", Pagninus, Montanus, Piscator. he hath made", &c. the covenant by which the kingdom was settled on David and his seed was a covenant that would continue for ever, and would be kept, "observed", and "preserved"F16שמרה "scrvatum", Tigurine version, Vatablus; "conservatum", Junius & Tremellius. in all the articles of it, and so be sure to his seed, particularly to the Messiah that should spring from him, in whom it was fulfilled, Luke 1:32; and the covenant of grace made with David's antitype, with Christ the head of the church, and the representative of it, and so with all his people in him, is an everlasting one: it was made with Christ from everlasting, as appears from the everlasting love of God, the source and spring of it; the earliness of the divine counsels on which it is formed, and blessings and promises of it, with which it is filled, which were before the world was; and from Christ being set up as the Mediator of it from everlasting: and it will continue to everlasting; it is a covenant that cannot be broken, will never be removed, nor give way to or be succeeded by another: it is "ordered in all things": to promote and advance the glory of all the three Persons in the Godhead, Father, Son, and Spirit; to secure the persons of the saints, and to provide everything needful for them for time and eternity: and it is "sure"; it stands upon a sure basis, the unchangeable will and favour of God, and is in the hands of Christ, the same today, yesterday, and for ever; its mercies are the sure mercies of David, and its promises are yea and amen in Christ, and are sure to all the seed. Though things may not be with them God-ward, as they desire, and could be wished for; though they may be attended with many sins and infirmities, the temptations of Satan, divine desertions, and various afflictions, and be guilty of many backslidings, yet covenant interest always continues; and so, though in the kingdom and interest of Christ in the world, there are, and may be, many things disagreeable; it may be attended with persecutions, heresies, scandals, &c. yet it shall continue and increase, and spread, and be an everlasting kingdom:

for this is all my salvation: all depends upon this covenant; the safety of David's family, and the security of the kingdom in it, and to his seed, till the Messiah came, depended on the covenant made with him respecting that; and the spiritual and eternal salvation of the Lord's people depends upon the covenant of grace; which was contrived, formed, and settled in it, in which the Saviour is provided, and the persons to share in his salvation are taken into it and secured, with all blessings both of grace and glory:

and all my desire; to see it fulfilled; as it is the desire of good men to be led more and more into it, to see their interest in it, to have the blessings and promises of it applied unto them, and to be saved by it, and not by the covenant of works; and there is all that in it that a believer can desire to make him comfortable here, or happy hereafter; and it is what gives him delight and pleasure in all his troubles: it may be supplied he is, as well as "this is", and be applied to Christ, the ruler over men, described, 2 Samuel 23:3; with whom the covenant of grace is made, in whom is the salvation of men; he is the author and the only author of it; in whom it is complete and perfect; "all" salvation is in him, and which they can claim as theirs; to whom is "all their desire"; and in whom is "all their delight", as it may be rendered; on account of the glory of his person, the fulness of his grace, and his suitableness as a Saviour; whom they desire to know more of, and have more communion with:

although he made it not to grow; though there may not be at present any growth of outward prosperity, or of inward grace, or even of the produce of the earth, Habakkuk 3:17; though the horn of David is not yet made to bud, or his family in growing and flourishing circumstances, or the Messiah, the man, the branch, does not yet shoot forth, though he certainly would; or, "for shall he not bud forth" he shall, Jeremiah 23:5.

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Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 23:5". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/2-samuel-23.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

Although my house [be] not so with God; yet he hath made with me an everlasting covenant, ordered in all [things], and sure: for [this is] all my salvation, and all [my] desire, although he make [it] not to d grow.

(d) But that my kingdom may continue for ever according to his promise.
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Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 23:5". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/2-samuel-23.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

Although my house be not so with God; yet he hath made with me an everlasting covenant, ordered in all things, and sure — “the light of the morning,” that is, the beginning of David‘s kingdom, was unlike the clear brilliant dawn of an Eastern day but was overcast by many black and threatening clouds; neither he nor his family had been like the tender grass springing up from the ground and flourishing by the united influences of the sun and rain; but rather like the grass that withereth and is prematurely cut down. The meaning is: although David‘s house had not flourished in an uninterrupted course of worldly prosperity and greatness, according to his hopes; although great crimes and calamities had beclouded his family history; some of the most promising branches of the royal tree had been cut down in his lifetime and many of his successors should suffer in like manner for their personal sins; although many reverses and revolutions may overtake his race and his kingdom, yet it was to him a subject of the highest joy and thankfulness that God will inviolably maintain His covenant with his family, until the advent of his greatest Son, the Messiah, who was the special object of his desire, and the author of his salvation.

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This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 23:5". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/2-samuel-23.html. 1871-8.

Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary

(5) Although my house be not so with God; yet he hath made with me an everlasting covenant, ordered in all things, and sure: for this is all my salvation, and all my desire, although he make it not to grow.

How natural and proper was it for David, when speaking of JESUS, and his salvation, to make an immediate transition to his own personal interest in both; and to take comfort from this delightful assurance, amidst all the outward circumstances which had arisen through life to distress him. Reader! as this verse of David's hath afforded comfort to thousands, and will continue to do so until time shall be no more, I would wish you not to pass it over hastily, but look into its several properties, praying over it, that the LORD may grant you to adopt (if it be his blessed will) the same precious assurance on the same precious grounds. Do observe the confession David makes of his personal calamities. Although, (says he) my house be not so with GOD . Poor man! what a scene of sin and evil did the walls of his house furnish in his graceless children. To say nothing of the great miscarriages he had wrought himself; his day was a day of clouds, from morning even to the evening. How many of his children died in their sins! But what saith David under these trying circumstances? Although my house be not so with GOD yet hath he made with me an everlasting covenant. As if he had said, JESUS is mine, though he be not my childrens'. GOD hath given me JESUS, and that is enough; for in him I have all things. He is better to me than a thousand sons. Sweet consolation, and a glorious relief, under all afflictions. But this is not all included in it. The covenant in JESUS's blood and righteousness is an everlasting covenant. It reaches into eternity. It is also ordered in all things, brings all blessings with it. And it is sure: nothing can break it down. It may well be called the sure mercies of David. And lastly; David sums up all in declaring, that it is not only all his salvation, but all his desire, although he make it not to grow. As if he had said, In JESUS my felicity is so complete, my redemption so perfect, and my desires so fully answered, that I find no room for anything more. It is all my salvation, for it leaves no room for anything to be added: It is all my desire, for I can want nothing beside. Here then I rest my soul with all its capacious cravings for happiness. In JESUS I have all. Reader! what say you to this blessed conclusion of David!

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Hawker, Robert, D.D. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 23:5". "Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pmc/2-samuel-23.html. 1828.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

Although my house be not so with God; yet he hath made with me an everlasting covenant, ordered in all things, and sure: for this is all my salvation, and all my desire, although he make it not to grow.

Altho' — Although God knows, that neither I, nor my children have lived and ruled as we should have done, so justly, and in the fear of the Lord; and therefore have not enjoyed that uninterrupted prosperity which we might have enjoyed.

Covenant — Notwithstanding all our transgressions whereby we have broken covenant with God, yet God, to whom all my sins were known, was graciously pleased to make a sure covenant, to continue the kingdom to me, and to my seed for ever, chap7:16, until the coming of the Messiah who is to be my son and successor, and whose kingdom shall have no end.

Ordered — Ordained in all points by God's eternal counsel; and disposed by his wise and powerful providence which will over-rule all things, even the sins of my house so far, that although he punished them for their sins, yet he will not utterly root them out, nor break his covenant made with me and mine.

Sure — Or, preserved, by God's power and faithfulness in the midst of all oppositions.

For this — Or, in this is, that is, it consists in, and depends upon this covenant.

Salvation — Both mine own eternal salvation, and the preservation of the kingdom to me and mine.

Tho' — Although God as yet hath not made my house or family to grow; that is, to increase, or to flourish with worldly glory as I expected; yet this is my comfort, that God will inviolably keep this covenant. But this refers also to the covenant of grace made with all believers. This is indeed an everlasting covenant, from everlasting, in the contrivance of it, and to everlasting, in the continuance and the consequence of it. It is ordered, well ordered in all things; admirably well, to advance the glory of God and the honour of the mediator, together with the holiness and happiness of believers. It is sure, and therefore sure, because well-ordered: the promised mercies are sure, on the performance of the conditions. It is all our salvation: nothing but this will save us, and this is sufficient. Therefore it should be all our desire. Let me have an interest in this covenant, and I have enough, I desire no more.

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Wesley, John. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 23:5". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/2-samuel-23.html. 1765.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

2 Samuel 23:5 Although my house [be] not so with God; yet he hath made with me an everlasting covenant, ordered in all [things], and sure: for [this is] all my salvation, and all [my] desire, although he make [it] not to grow.

Ver. 5. Although my house be not so with God.] Or, And is not my house so with God? so some render it interrogatively, q.d., Either it is or it ought to be. But in case it be not, as the truth is, "In many things we offend all," and keep not touch with God, - which is a hindrance to our complete happiness, - yet the foundation of God remaineth sure; neither shall our unbelief make the faith of God of none effect. [Romans 3:3] We change often, but he changeth not, [Malachi 3:6] and his covenant is firm and immutable, [Jeremiah 31:32-34] "ordered and established in everything," by him who will "not suffer his faithfulness to fail, nor alter the thing that is gone out of his mouth."

For this is all my salvation and all my desire.] In eo uno acquiesco. In this covenant with me and my house, through Christ, I rest fully satisfied, and have abundant complacency; through good assur ance of safety here, and salvation hereafter.

Although he make it not to grow,] i.e., Though the glory of my temporal kingdom grow not; but there fall out sometimes wants of issue, and ruin of state. Some make this to be the sense, Although I see not that blessed Branch, the Messiah yet to grow forth, who is all my salvation, and my desire, will, or longing. Compare Isaiah 4:2.

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 23:5". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/2-samuel-23.html. 1865-1868.

Sermon Bible Commentary

2 Samuel 23:5

Thus the thought of the shortcomings of family religion entered into the last words of David, the son of Jesse, and laid a shadow upon his dying peace. Of all the images under which another world has been revealed to us, the best and the happiest is by far "My Father's house." But in proportion as the anticipation of that Father's house is clear, and beautiful, and distinct, will the contrast of the earthly home grow every day more intolerable.

I. It is a very rare thing to find much freedom of intercourse on spiritual subjects among the members of the same family, so that many give the confidences of their souls to comparative strangers, who seldom, if ever, speak on deep matters of personal religion to their parents or brothers or sisters. The reason of this is threefold: (1) the general law which rules most minds that they honour more what is at a distance than what is near; (2) the consciousness that we all have that our near relations are acquainted with our infirmities and inconsis-tencies—a consciousness which ties the tongue; (3) the want of effort, that effort without which no conversation is ever profitable, and without which no real benefit is ever given or received in any matter.

II. If the frequency of the custom had not almost accustomed our minds to it, we should all mark and be offended with the way in which many Christian fathers and mothers discharge their parental duties. The grace of reverence has fallen away from almost all our home duties. The man who is unreverential towards his parents can never have true reverence for God.

III. The chief reason of family evils is that there is so little prayer in our homes. We want the ark in the house, the Shechinah, to fill the rooms and make them all little sanctuaries.

J. Vaughan, Sermons, 9th series, p. 134 (see also Fifty Sermons, 1874, p. 320).


References: 2 Samuel 23:5.—Spurgeon, Morning by Morning, p. 356; J. M. Neale, Sermons in Sackville College, vol. i., p. 37; J. Irons, Thursday Penny Pulpit, vol. v., p. 409; Spurgeon, Sermons, vol. i., No. 19. 2 Samuel 23:11, 2 Samuel 23:12.—S. Baring-Gould, Village Preaching for a Year, vol. ii., p. 204. 2 Samuel 23:13-17.—Sermons for Boys and Girls, p. 403. 2 Samuel 23:15.—M. Nicholson, Redeeming the Time, p. 180.

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Nicoll, William R. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 23:5". "Sermon Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/sbc/2-samuel-23.html.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

2 Samuel 23:5. Although my house be not so with God, &c.— This passage is universally allowed to be extremely difficult and obscure. I have not met with any interpretation which appears preferable to that given by Dr. Grey. But to those, says he, who prefer the common way of pointing, (for I make no alteration in the words of the text,) perhaps the following explanation may not appear unnatural: "Although the present situation of myself and family, and of the people of God, falls so much short of these glorious characters; yet I am fully assured, that such a time will come, according to the covenant he hath renewed with me, and his promise since the world began."

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Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 23:5". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/2-samuel-23.html. 1801-1803.

Charles Simeon's Horae Homileticae

DISCOURSE: 326

THE COVENANT OF GRACE

2 Samuel 23:5. Although my house be not so with God; yet he hath made with me an everlasting covenant, ordered in all things, and sure: for this is all my salvation, and all my desire.

IN all the trials and troubles of life, religion alone can afford us any effectual support. To this the saints in all ages have fled for refuge, and in this they have found all the consolation they could desire. The latter days of David were a continual scene of domestic sorrows. The defilement of Tamar by her brother Amnon, the murder of Amnon by his brother Absalom, the rebellion and untimely death of Absalom, and the conspiracy and consequent destruction of Adonijah, all embittered his life: and God had foretold, that such afflictions should await him, as a punishment for the horrible sins he had committed in the matter of Uriah. David however was not without his consolations. Though he could not have the happiness of seeing his house walking in the ways of God, yet he had good reason to believe that God had accepted him; and in the view of the covenant which God had made with him, he could not but rejoice. We do not apprehend that this covenant related exclusively to the succession of his posterity upon the throne of Israel, or even to the advent of the Messiah from his loins: it can be no other than that covenant which God made with his own Son, and with us in him; for no other covenant corresponds with the description here given of it, nor could David speak of any other as all his salvation and all his desire. That covenant relates to the salvation of a ruined world by the blood and righteousness of the Lord Jesus.

The representation which David here gives us of it will lead us to shew,

I. The excellence of this covenant—

This is set forth in a striking view in the words before us. We notice,

1. Its duration—

[Long before man had fallen, God, who foresaw his fall, devised a plan for his recovery: and in this plan his co-equal, co-eternal Son concurred: “The council of peace was between them both,” says the Prophet [Note: Zechariah 6:13.]. To this St. Paul alludes, when he says, that he was “in hope of eternal life, which God had promised before the world began [Note: Titus 1:2.].” To whom could that promise be made, but unto the Lord Jesus Christ, as the Representative of his Church and people? Some divines have called this the covenant of Redemption, as contra-distinguished from the covenant of Grace; the one being made with Christ only, and the other with man. But this appears not founded in Scripture. There is one covenant only; and that was made with Christ personally, and with him as the federal Head and Representative of his elect people: as made with him personally, it promised him a seed, if he would lay down his life for them [Note: Isaiah 53:10-11.]; and as made with him federally, it promised salvation to all who should believe in him, and become members of his mystical body [Note: Galatians 3:16-17.].

Now this covenant is “everlasting;” it has existed from the beginning, and shall exist to all eternity. No human being ever has been saved but by virtue of it; nor shall any child of man ever be admitted into heaven, but agreeably to its provisions. We say not that no person ever has been, or shall be, saved without a distinct acquaintance with it: for we believe that many heathens who never heard of it, and millions of children who have been incapable of understanding any thing about it, have been saved; but not a single soul has ever been accepted of God the Father, but as redeemed by the blood of his only-begotten Son. And perhaps we may say, that this circumstance gives to the glorified saints an advantage over angels themselves: for angels, though confirmed, we trust, in their happiness by the power of God, do not hold that happiness by so sure a tenure as the saints hold theirs: they cannot boast of holding it by the promise and oath of Jehovah; they cannot shew a covenant securing to them the everlasting possession of their inheritance, and that covenant confirmed and ratified with the blood of God’s only dear Son: but we can refer to such a covenant, as the sure ground of all our expectations, and as the pledge that nothing shall ever separate us from the enjoyment of our God [Note: 2 Corinthians 1:20.].]

2. Its fulness—

[It may truly be said to be “ordered in all things.” There is not any thing that can conduce to our happiness either in this world or the next, that is not comprehended in it. Every thing is prepared for us both in a way of providence and of grace. All our comforts, and all our trials, are therein adjusted for our good. All earthly things are secured to us, as far as they are necessary [Note: Matthew 6:33.]; and even afflictions themselves are promised, as the appointed means of fitting us for the realms of bliss [Note: Jeremiah 30:11.]. Whatever grace we stand in need of, it shall be given at such times, and in such a measure, as shall most display the glory of God. It is true that God requires of us many things, as repentance, faith, and holiness; but it is equally true that he promises all these things to us: he has “exalted his own Son to give us repentance [Note: Acts 5:31.];” he also gives us to believe in Christ [Note: Philippians 1:29.]; and he promises that he will, by the influence of his Spirit, cause us to walk in his statutes, and to keep his judgments and do them [Note: Ezekiel 36:25-27.]. We cannot place ourselves in any situation wherein God has not given us promises, “exceeding great and precious promises,” suited to our necessities, and commensurate with our wants: nor is so small a thing as the falling of a hair of our head left to chance; it is all ordered by unerring wisdom: and though there may be some events which, separately and distinctly considered, may be regarded as evil, yet, collectively taken in all their bearings, they shall “all work together for our eternal good [Note: Romans 8:28.].”]

3. Its certainty—

[It is “sure” to every one who trusts in it. In this it differs widely from the covenant of works which was made with man in innocence: for that depending on the fidelity of the creature, was violated, and annulled: whereas this, depending altogether on the fidelity of God, who undertakes to work in us all that he requires of us, and who engages not only not to depart from us, but not to suffer us to depart from him [Note: Jeremiah 32:40.], shall never fail in any one particular: “The mountains may depart and the hills be removed, but the covenant of my peace shall not be removed, saith the Lord that hath mercy on us [Note: Isaiah 54:9-10.].” True it is that, as under the Jewish dispensation many were not steadfast in that covenant, which was a mixed, and national covenant, so many who profess religion do really “make shipwreck of the faith [Note: 1 Timothy 1:19.]:” but they have never truly embraced the covenant of which we are speaking: they have embraced it only in a partial way, looking for its blessings without duly considering its obligations: they have been more intent on salvation from punishment, than salvation from sin. “Had they been really of us,” says the Apostle, “they would no doubt have continued with us [Note: 1 John 2:19.].” “The foundation of God standeth sure: the Lord knoweth them that are his. But let every one that nameth the name of Christ depart from iniquity [Note: 2 Timothy 2:19. καὶ should here be translated but. Compare 1 Corinthians 12:5; 1 Corinthians 16:12 and 2 Timothy 3:11 in the Greek.].” This being our indispensable duty, God promises and engages, “that sin shall not have dominion over us, because we are not under the law, but under grace [Note: Romans 6:14.]:” and we know that “He is faithful who hath called us, who also will do it [Note: 1 Thessalonians 5:23-24. Mark the connexion of these two verses.]:” and this very circumstance of its being an article in God’s covenant, a blessing to be gratuitously conferred by him, and freely received by us, this, I say, it is, which makes “the promise sure to all the seed [Note: Romans 4:16.].”]

When once we view this covenant aright we shall see immediately,

II. The regard which it deserves—

We should not regard it merely as an object of curious research, or even of grateful admiration; but should make it,

1. The ground of all our hopes—

[Every other method of acceptance should be renounced; and this should be deliberately and cordially embraced [Note: 2 Timothy 1:9. The two members of this sentence may be greatly enlarged.] — — — We should contemplate every offer of mercy, every communication of grace, every mean of salvation as originating in the eternal counsels of Heaven: every thing should be traced up to the love of God the Father, and to the plans arranged by the sacred Three, for the magnifying of the divine perfections in the salvation of man — — — Even the atonement itself must be considered as deriving all its efficacy from this covenant: for, if God the Father had not consented to accept his Son as a surety for us, and to regard his death as an atonement for our sin, however honourable to Christ his mediation for us might be, it would not have been available for our salvation. We should get such a distinct view of this covenant as David had; of its duration, (from everlasting to everlasting;) its fulness, its certainty; and then should say of it as he did, “This is all my salvation;” except in this, I have no more hope than the fallen angels: but through the provision which this has made for me, I scarcely envy the angels who never fell: for “I know in whom I have believed, that He is able to keep that which I have committed to him [Note: 2 Timothy 4:8.]:” and “I am confident that he who hath begun a good work in me will perform it until the day of Jesus Christ [Note: 2 Timothy 1:12.].”]

2. The source of all our joys—

[Whatever comforts we may possess in this world, we should derive our chief happiness from this: this should be “all our desire,” or, as the word imports, all our delight — — — To this also we should have recourse in every season of affliction. David betook himself to it under all his domestic troubles, and in the near prospect of eternity. “His house, alas! was not so with God,” as he could wish. And how many are there who have great trials in their families! some from their unkindness, and others from their removal by death [Note: This may be amplified so as to apply to many cases which may greatly interest the feelings of an audience.] — — — Let every one that is so circumstanced learn from David where to flee for comfort: let him contemplate the riches of divine grace as exhibited in the covenant, and the blessedness of having an interest in it, and he will soon forget his sorrows, and have a heart overflowing with the most exalted joy — — — If, in addition to other troubles, we are lying upon the bed of death, we may well, like David, seek comfort in this covenant, and make “the last words of David [Note: ver. 1.]” our last words also. What can so effectually remove the sting of death, as to behold a covenant-God in Christ Jesus, engaged to “keep him unto the end,” and to receive him to an everlasting enjoyment of his presence and glory? — — — Study then the wonders of this covenant, that they may be familiar to your minds in a time of health; and so shall they fill you with unutterable peace and joy, when every other refuge shall fail, and your soul be summoned into the presence of its God.]

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Simeon, Charles. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 23:5". Charles Simeon's Horae Homileticae. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/shh/2-samuel-23.html. 1832.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Although my house be not so with God; although God knows that neither I nor my children have lived and ruled as we should have done, so justly, and in the fear of the Lord; and therefore have not enjoyed that uninterrupted prosperity which we might have enjoyed; but our morning light, or the beginning of that kingdom promised to me and mine for ever, hath been overcast with many black and dismal clouds, and my children have not hitherto been like the tender grass springing out of the earth, and thriving by the influences of the sun and rain; but rather like the grass that withereth away, or is cut off before its due time.

Yet he hath made with me an everlasting covenant: not-withstanding all our transgressions whereby we have broken covenant with God, and the confusions and civil wars. which have threatened our dissipation and utter destruction; yet I comfort myself with this, that God, to whom all my sins were foreknown before I committed them, was graciously pleased to make a sure covenant, to give and continue the kingdom to me and to my seed for ever, 2 Samuel 7:16, until the coming of the Messias, who is to be my Son and successor, and whose kingdom shall have no end.

Ordered in all things; ordained in all points by God’s eternal and unchangeable counsel; and disposed by his wise and powerful providence, which doth and will overrule all things, even the sins and sufferings of my house, so far, that although he would punish them for their sins, yet he will not utterly root them out, nor break his covenant made with me and mine; as is said, Psalms 89:31-34. Sure, or preserved or observed, or kept, to wit, on God’s part, or by God’s power and faithfulness, in the midst of all the oppositions and uncertainties to which it seems to be exposed on our part. Compare Romans 3:3 2 Timothy 2:13. For, or therefore, as the Hebrew particle chi oft signifies; therefore, i.e. because God hath made such a covenant. This is, or, he is, he who hath made this covenant; or, in this is, i.e. it consists in and depends upon this covenant.

All my salvation; both my own eternal salvation, and the temporal salvation, or the preservation of the kingdom to me and mine.

All my desire, or, every desirable thing; the word desire being oft put for desired, or a desirable thing; as Psalms 21:2 78:29,30 Eze 24:16. David being deeply sensible, and having had large experience, of the vanity and uncertainty of all earthly things, here declares that the covenant made by God with him and his in the Messias, is the only happiness which he prizeth and desireth, in which he doth fully acquiesce.

Although he make it not to grow, i.e. my house, mentioned before. So the sense is, Although God as yet hath not made my house or family to grow, i.e. to increase, or to flourish with worldly glory and prosperity, as I expected; but hath for my sins cut off divers of my most eminent branches, and sorely afflicted my person and family; and although he may for the future deal in like manner with my sons and successors for the like miscarriages, which it is probable they may commit: yet this is my great support and comfort, that God will constantly and inviolably keep this covenant; and therefore, in the midst of all the shakings, and confusions, and interruptions which may happen in my house and kingdom, will preserve my line and family until the coming of the Messiah out of my loins, whose kingdom is an everlasting kingdom; who, as he is the desire of all nations, Haggai 2:7, so in a special manner is my desire, and the author of all my salvation.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on 2 Samuel 23:5". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/2-samuel-23.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

5.For is not my house so with God — By taking this sentence, and also the one with which the verse concludes, interrogatively, we are relieved of the difficulties which have here puzzled interpreters. The meaning then becomes plain. David’s inspired vision of the righteous ruler is based upon the everlasting covenant which God had made with his house. To that covenant he here appeals as the ground of his hopes and oracles.

Arranged in all things — Provided with every thing that will augment its glory, or help to establish it.

Guarded — Secured against dangers and failure. Even though David’s sons commit iniquity, yet will not Jehovah’s covenant be unfulfilled. See 2 Samuel 7:15.

Will it not become mighty — Will not this covenant grow stronger with the passing years, develope, and in the grace and providence of God at last be verified amidst incalculable power and glory? Such was David’s most ardent hope and trust, and well might he call it all his salvation and delight.

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 23:5". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/2-samuel-23.html. 1874-1909.

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

2 Samuel 23:5. Although my house be not so with God — Although God knows that neither I nor my children have lived and ruled as we should have done, so justly, and in the fear of the Lord; and therefore have not enjoyed that uninterrupted prosperity which we might have enjoyed. Covenant — Notwithstanding all our transgressions whereby we have broken covenant with God, yet God, to whom all my sins were known, was graciously pleased to make a sure covenant, to continue the kingdom to me, and to my seed for ever, 2 Samuel 7:16, until the coming of the Messiah, who is to be my son and successor, and whose kingdom shall have no end. Ordered in all things — Ordained in all points by God’s eternal counsel, and disposed by his wise and powerful providence, which will overrule all things, even the sins of my house so far, that although he punish them for their sins, yet he will not utterly root them out, nor break his covenant made with me and mine. Sure — Or, preserved, by God’s power and faithfulness in the midst of all oppositions. For this is all my salvation — That is, my salvation consists in, and depends on, this covenant; even both my own eternal salvation, and the preservation of the kingdom to me and mine. Although he make it not, &c. — Although God, as yet, hath not made my house or family to grow; that is, to increase, or to flourish with worldly glory as I expected; yet this is my comfort, that God will inviolably keep this covenant. But this refers also to the covenant of grace made with all believers. This is indeed an everlasting covenant, from everlasting, in the contrivance of it, and to everlasting, in the continuance and consequence of it. It is ordered, well ordered in all things; admirably well, to advance the glory of God, and the honour of the Mediator, together with the holiness and happiness of believers. It is sure, and therefore sure, because well ordered: the promised mercies are sure, on the performance of the conditions. It is all our salvation: nothing but this will save us, and this is sufficient. Therefore it should be all our desire. Let me have an interest in this covenant, and I have enough, I desire no more.

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Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 23:5". Joseph Benson's Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/2-samuel-23.html. 1857.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Neither is my house, &c. As if he should say: This everlasting covenant was not due to my house: but purely owing to his bounty, who is all my salvation, and my will; that is, who hath always saved me, and granted me what I desired of him; so that I and my house, through his blessing, have sprung up, and succeeded in all things. (Challoner) --- He clearly distinguishes between the covenant made with him as to his earthy kingdom, and that which regards Christ. (Worthington) --- Even the former should be of long duration, Psalm cxxxi. 11. (Haydock) --- Up. Hebrew seems to contradict all that had gone before; "for it shall not flourish." (Calmet) --- Protestants, "although he make it not to grow;" (Haydock) unless we read with an interrogation, "And shall not my family flourish?" which was a natural reverence to ver. 4. (Calmet) --- God had blessed David with the dew of heaven, and with the fatness of the earth. (Menochius) --- His glory and happiness should not be of short duration, like the brightest summer-day, or a transient flower. (Haydock)

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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 23:5". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/2-samuel-23.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

Although = For (Hebrew. ki)

GOD. Hebrew. "El. App-4.

Yet = for (Hebrew. ki)

For = (Hebrew. ki). Punctuate and translate.

it = i.e. my house

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 23:5". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/2-samuel-23.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

Although my house be not so with God; yet he hath made with me an everlasting covenant, ordered in all things, and sure: for this is all my salvation, and all my desire, although he make it not to grow.

Although my house be not so with God. Between his prediction of the beneficent effects of this Ruler's government and its destructive influences on his enemies, David throws in a parenthetical clause, relating to himself, which has been sadly marred in our translation. "The light of the morning" - i:e., the beginning of David's kingdom-was, unlike the clear, brilliant dawn of an Eastern day, overcast by many black and threatening clouds. Neither himself nor his family had been like the tender grass springing up from the ground, and flourishing by the united influences of the sun and rain; but rather like the grass that withereth, and is prematurely cut down. The meaning is, that although David's house had not flourished in an uninterrupted course of worldly prosperity and greatness, according to his hopes-although great crimes and calamities had beclouded his family history-some of the moot promising branches of the royal tree had been cut down in his lifetime-and many of his successors should suffer in like manner for their personal sins-although many reverses and revolutions may overtake his race and his kingdom-yet it was to him a subject of the highest joy and thankfulness that God will inviolably maintain His covenant with His family until the advent of His greatest Son, the Messiah, who was the special object of his desire, and the author of his salvation.

This is the common view of the passage-a view, however, encumbered by so many and so great difficulties as necessitates its abandonment. It represents David, whose doting fondness for his sons rendered him blind to their errors and crimes, as making a strong assertion to their disadvantage; as acknowledging his painful conviction that they were far from exemplifying the attributes of character that were symbolized by the morning sun and the springing of the tender grass; and selfishly congratulating himself, that though his house might be excluded from the blessings of the Great Ruler's government, he would personally enjoy them to the utmost extent of his wishes. It is opposed to the tenor of the context, which guarantees the fulfillment of the covenant promise, not to David personally so much as to his posterity; not to his family but to his house, his dynasty (see 2 Samuel 7:11-16); so that it obviously could not be his intention to draw a picture that would be flattering to himself and disadvantageous to his house, or to admit the one, but exclude the other from the blessings of the promise. Besides, it rests upon an unsound philological basis; because it has given to the Hebrew conjunction [ kiy (Hebrew #3588), for], which stands at the commencement of the four clauses in 2 Samuel 23:5, as many different significations-although, yet, for, and although a second time. A word which is forced to play so many parts for the purpose of supporting a particular view is evidently perverted from its proper use; whereas, let it bear its legitimate sense, at the same time giving to the first and last clauses an interrogative form, and the several parts of the verse will appear to harmonize with each other, as well as with the context.

`For is not my house so with God? For He hath made with me an everlasting covenant, ordered in all things and sure; For this is all my salvation, and all my desire: For will He not make it (namely, my house) to grow?'

'Is not my house so with God?' - i:e., my dynasty bearing a resemblance to the morning sun and the luxuriant growth of the grass after a seasonable shower; and that his own reign, and that of many of his royal successors on the throne of Judah, did wonderfully approximate in spirit and in beneficent influence to that of the Messiah, the course of the sacred history relating to David, Solomon, Asa, Jehoshaphat, Hezekiah, Josiah, etc., abundantly attests.

An everlasting covenant, ordered in all things, [ `

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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 23:5". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/2-samuel-23.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(5) Although my house.—This verse is extremely difficult, and admits of two interpretations. That given in the English is found in the LXX., the Vulg., and the Syriac, and if adopted will mean that David recognises how far he and his house have failed to realise the ideal description set forth; yet since God’s promise is sure, this must be realised in his posterity. Most modern commentators, however, prefer to take the clauses interrogatively: “Is not my house thus with God? for He hath made with me an everlasting covenant, ordered in all, and sure. For all my salvation and all my desire, shall He not cause it to spring forth?” The Hebrew admits either rendering, but that of the ancient versions gives a higher idea of David’s spiritual discernment.

Ordered in all.—As a carefully drawn legal document, providing for all contingencies and leaving no room for misconstruction.

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 23:5". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/2-samuel-23.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Although my house be not so with God; yet he hath made with me an everlasting covenant, ordered in all things, and sure: for this is all my salvation, and all my desire, although he make it not to grow.
Although
7:18; 12:10; 13:14,28; 18:14; 1 Kings 1:5; 2:24,25; 11:6-8; 12:14
he hath made
7:14-16; 1 Chronicles 17:11-14; Psalms 89:3,28; Isaiah 9:6,7; 55:3; 61:8; Jeremiah 32:40; Jeremiah 33:25,26; Ezekiel 37:26; Hebrews 13:20
and sure
1 Samuel 2:35; 25:28; 1 Kings 11:38; Acts 13:34; Hebrews 6:19
all my salvation
Psalms 62:2; 119:81
desire
Psalms 27:4; 63:1-3; 73:25,26
to grow
Isaiah 4:2; 7:14; 9:6,7; 11:1; 27:6; Amos 9:11; 1 Corinthians 3:6,7
Reciprocal: Genesis 9:16 - everlasting;  Genesis 15:18 - made;  Genesis 17:8 - everlasting;  Exodus 6:4 - established;  1 Chronicles 7:23 - because;  1 Chronicles 16:17 - an everlasting;  2 Chronicles 21:7 - because;  Psalm 19:7 - sure;  Psalm 74:20 - Have;  Psalm 105:10 - an everlasting;  Psalm 111:9 - he hath;  Psalm 119:174 - longed;  Song of Solomon 3:9 - a chariot;  Isaiah 24:5 - broken;  Isaiah 26:8 - desire;  Isaiah 54:10 - the covenant;  Isaiah 56:4 - take hold;  Jeremiah 33:21 - may;  Jeremiah 50:5 - in a;  Ezekiel 16:60 - I will establish;  1 Peter 2:2 - grow;  Revelation 14:6 - everlasting

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 23:5". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/2-samuel-23.html.

Commentary by J.C.Philpot on select texts of the Bible

2 Samuel 23:2

"The Spirit of the Lord spoke by me, and his word was in my tongue."2 Samuel 23:2

We read that "no prophecy of the Scripture is of any private interpretation;" that is to say, it is the public property of the whole family of Jehovah; and "holy men of God spoke as they were moved by the Holy Spirit;" the Holy Spirit so influencing and working upon their minds as to make them bring forth out of their hearts that which should be suitable to the whole family of God. For instance, we read in Psalm 51:1-19, David"s confession of sin; but David"s confession of sin applies to every soul that is condemned on account of sin. When Job, also, poured out his piteous complaints, he was speaking; though he might not know it, for the children of God to the remotest time.

So when the Lord said to Joshua, "I will never leave you, nor forsake you," it was a promise specially given to Joshua; it seemed to be confined to that individual; it appeared to be of private interpretation, as though Joshua, and Joshua alone, was entitled to that promise. But we find the apostle Paul bringing forward this promise as the general property of the whole Church of God—"Let your life be without covetousness; and be content with such things as you have—for he has said, I will never leave you, nor forsake you" ( Hebrews 13:5). "He has said?" to whom? To Joshua; but in saying it to Joshua, he said it to the Church of God; in giving Joshua the promise, he gave that promise to every soul that needed with Joshua his help, that feared with Joshua to be forsaken, that wanted with Joshua his sustaining hand; and therefore this private promise to Joshua was not of private interpretation, but, when applied by the blessed Spirit, suits every living soul that is placed in similar circumstances with the individual to whom that promise was addressed.

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Philpot, Joseph Charles. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 23:5". Commentary by J.C.Philpot on select texts of the Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jcp/2-samuel-23.html.