Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

2 Timothy 3:1

But realize this, that in the last days difficult times will come.
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Apostasy;   Citizens;   Formalism;   Minister, Christian;   Scofield Reference Index - Apostasy;   Summary;   Thompson Chain Reference - Corruption;   Days;   Evil;   Last Days;   Nation, the;   Times, Evil;   The Topic Concordance - Knowledge;   Last Days;   Turning;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Selfishness;  
Dictionaries:
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Day of the lord;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Last Day(s), Latter Days, Last Times;   Second Coming of Christ;   Time;   Timothy, First and Second, Theology of;   Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Jesus Christ;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Antichrist;   Divination;   Idol;   Miracles;   Timothy, the Second Epistle to;   Tyre;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Titus, Epistle to;   2 Thessalonians;   2 Timothy;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Heady;   Jude, Epistle of;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Ascension of Isaiah;   Brotherly Love;   Day;   Day and Night;   Goodness (Human);   Kingdom Kingdom of God;   Paul;   Time;   Timothy and Titus Epistles to;   Truth;   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Last Time or Days;   Perilous Times;   Prophets, the;   48 To Know, Perceive, Understand;   Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Paul;  
Encyclopedias:
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Day, Last;   Eschatology of the New Testament;   Jude, the Epistle of;   Peter, Simon;  
Devotionals:
Every Day Light - Devotion for October 25;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

In the last days - This often means the days of the Messiah, and is sometimes extended in its signification to the destruction of Jerusalem, as this was properly the last days of the Jewish state. But the phrase may mean any future time, whether near or distant.

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Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on 2 Timothy 3:1". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/2-timothy-3.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

This know also - The “object” of this reference to the perilous times which were to occur, was evidently to show the necessity of using every precaution to preserve the purity of the church, from the fact that such sad scenes were to open upon it. The apostle had dwelt upon this subject in his First Epistle to Timothy 1 Timothy 4:1 note, and Hebrews 1:2 note.

Perilous times shall come - Times of danger, of persecution, and of trial. On the general meaning of this passage, and the general characteristics of those times, the reader may consult the 2 Thessalonians 2:1-12 notes, and 1 Timothy 4:1-3 notes. There can be no doubt that in all these passages the apostle refers to the same events.

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on 2 Timothy 3:1". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/2-timothy-3.html. 1870.

The Biblical Illustrator

2 Timothy 3:1

Perilous times shall come.

Perilous times

I. The manner of the warning.

“This know also.”

1. It is the duty of ministers to foresee and take notice of the dangers which the churches are falling into.

2. It is the great concern of all professors and believers to have their hearts very much fixed upon present and approaching dangers.

3. Not to be sensible of a present perilous season is that security which the scripture so condemns; and I will leave it with you under these three things--

II. The evil itself. “Perilous times”--times of great difficulty, like those of public plagues, when death lies at every door.

III. The manner of introduction--“Shall come.” Our great wisdom then will be to eye the displeasure of God in perilous seasons, since there is a judicial hand of God in them: and we see in ourselves reason enough why they should come.

IV. The time and season of it--“In the last days.” You may take it in what sense you will: the last days, the days of the gospel; the last days towards the consummation of all things; the last days following the days of the profession of churches; and the last days with many of us, with respect to our lives.

1. The first thing that makes a season perilous is, when the profession of true religion is outwardly maintained under a visible predominancy of horrible lusts and wickedness (see 2 Timothy 3:2-5).

2. A second perilous season is, when men are prone to forsake the truth, and seducers abound to gather them up that are so; and you will have always these things go together. If it be asked, how we may know whether there be a proneness in the minds of men in any season to depart from the truth? there are three ways whereby we may judge of it.

3. A third thing that makes a perilous season is, professors mixing themselves with the world, and learning their manners. Such a season is dangerous, because the sins of professors in it lie directly contrary to the whole design of the mediation of Christ in this world. Christ “gave Himself for us, that He might purge us from dead works, and purify us unto Himself a peculiar people” (Titus 2:14). “Ye are a royal nation, a peculiar people.”

4. Another perilous season is when there is great attendance on outward duties, but inward, spiritual decays.

5. Times of persecution are also times of peril.

Use

1. Let us all be exhorted to endeavour to get our hearts affected with the perils of the day wherein we live.

2. The next thing is this, that there are two things in a perilous season--the sin of it, and the misery of it. Labour to be sensible of the former, or you will never be sensible of the latter. Use

3. Remember there is a special frame of spirit required in us all in such perilous seasons as these are. And what is that? It is a mourning frame of spirit. Use

4. Keep up church watch with diligence, and by the rule. When I say rule, I mean the life of it. Use

5. Reckon upon it, that in such times as these are, all of us will not go free. (John Owen, D. D.)

Perilous times in the last days

1. The notification of an event as future--“Perilous times shall come.”

2. The time of that event--“In the last days.” The days of the gospel are the concluding period of time. In these last days are several particular periods; the first of which was the last time of the Jewish state, beginning from the time of our Saviour, to the destruction of Jerusalem; and more periods followed, and some are yet to come; but from the time of our Saviour to the end of the world, is “the last days.”

3. The notice to be taken of that event--“This know also”; rather, “Now know this”; consider it duly, and lay it to heart, that being fore warned, ye may be armed against the “perilous times.”

I. We shall consider “the days of the gospel as the last days.” And so we may take them up in a threefold view.

1. As the last days of the world, the latter end of time. With rela tion to them that oath is made (Revelation 10:6). The morning and forenoon of the world are over; it is afternoon with it now, and drawing toward the evening.

2. As the days of the last dispensation of grace towards the world, with which God’s dealing with sinners for reconciliation shall be closed (Revelation 10:7). There have been three dispensations of grace in the world: the Patriarchal dispensation in the first days; the Mosaical dispensation in the middle days; and now the Christian dispensation in the last days. The first two are now off the stage, and shall never come on again; the third now is; and after it there shall never be another.

3. As the best days of the world in respect of the greatest advantages attending them. The last works of God are always the greatest, as ye may see in the account of the Creation (Genesis 1:1-31.); so the circumstances of the world to come are greater than those of this. The gospel-dispensation far excels the other two, in clearness, extensiveness, and efficacy, through a larger measure of the Spirit.

II. The difficult and perilous times that come on in gospel days. We must inquire what makes these perilous times.

1. An old controversy lying over untaken up. They that are in debt are always in danger. The Jews were from generation to generation murderers of their prophets; there was an old debt on the head of the generation in our Saviour’s time (Matthew 23:31); and made their time perilous, for it was like a train lying, which at last came to blow them up (verse 35). So good Josiah’s days were perilous times, by reason of an old controversy laid in the days of Manasseh his grandfather (2 Kings 23:26). Our times are so, by reason of the iniquity of the late times, which is like that of Baal-peer, that brought “a plague on the congregation of the Lord” (Joshua 22:17).

1. Error or corruption of principles spreading. This was foretold to happen in the latter days (1 Timothy 4:1).

2. Immoralities abounding. (T. Boston, D. D.)

Evil of the last days

These (evil characters) will swarm like flies in the decay of the year. (C. H. Spurgeon.)

Corruptions within

Not so much on the account of persecutions from without as on the account of corruptions within. (M. Henry.)

Traitors

Two traitors within the garrison may do more hurt to it than two thousand besiegers without. (M. Henry.)

Fidelity in evil times

The worse the times we live in are, the greater will our honour be, if we be faithful. It was Lot’s commendation that he was good in Sodom, and Job in an heathenish Uz. The more sin abounds, the more our grace should abound; and the more sin appears in the world, the more should we appear against it. The Lord hath done more for us of this last age of the world than He ever did for our forefathers, and therefore He expects more from us than He did from them; where He bestows much He looks for much again; where we bestow double cost, we look for a double crop. It is a shame for us if we do not do our work better by sunlight, than others that have had but twilight. (T. Hall, B. D.)

Sin makes the times bad

It is worth our noting that the apostle doth not place the peril and hardness of the last times, in any external calamity or penal evils, as sword, plague, famine, persecution; but in the prodigious sins and enormities of such as profess religion. Sin is the evil of evils, and brings all other evils with it. Let the times be never so miserable, and the Church lie under sad persecutions; yet if they be not sinful times, they are not truly perilous times, but rather purging and purifying times. (T. Hall, B. D.)

Sinners swarm even in gospel days

Vermin of this kind will then abound everywhere; weeds grow nowhere so rank as in fat soil. (T. Hall, B. D.)

Prudence in perilous times

This spiritual prudence can hurt neither pastor nor people, but will advantage us much. This pre-vision is the best means of prevention; in vain is the snare laid in the sight of a bird. Observe God’s singular love unto His people, in that He warns them of perilous times long before they come. The people of God, and specially His ministers, His Timothies, should be so prudent as to know and observe when perilous times are approaching, as the prudent man foresees the evil of punishment before it comes (Proverbs 22:3-5). (T. Hall, B. D.)

Time aiding proficiency in sin

As it is in every art, by length of time, custom, and experience, it is improved to a greater degree of fineness and exactness; so it is in this of sinning; time and experience make men more cunning in ways of sin, and more subtle to defend them. (T. Hall, B. D.)

Making the times better

We should all make the times and places we live in the better, and not the worse, for us. (T. Hall, B. D.)

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Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Exell, Joseph S. "Commentary on "2 Timothy 3:1". The Biblical Illustrator. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tbi/2-timothy-3.html. 1905-1909. New York.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

This chapter has a vivid description of the great apostasy (2 Timothy 3:1-9), signs of which were already present, an appeal to Paul's own inspiring and inspired example (2 Timothy 3:10-15), and one of the most impressive paragraphs in all the Bible with reference to the inspiration of the Holy Scriptures (2 Timothy 3:16,17).

For more extensive discussion of the apostasy, the man of sin, and antichrist, see excursus at end of 2 Thessalonians 2.

But know this, that in the last days grievous times shall come. See 2 Timothy 3:1.

Know this ... "Be keeping this in mind."[1]

In the last days ... It is a mistake to identify this period as restricted to times immediately prior to the Second Advent; because, as the passage itself shows, examples of the grievous times were plentiful at the time Paul wrote. Wesley said, "This means the times of the gospel dispensation."[2] As Spain pointed out, "The word here is the same as in Acts 2:17 where Peter refers to the Christian age or the age of the church on earth."[3] "The days of the Messiah are often alluded to by the Hebrew prophets as `the last days' (Isaiah 2:2; Hosea 3:5; Micah 4:1)."[4]

Grievous times ... Although perhaps a better rendition than "perilous times," as in KJV, scholars seem to be agreed that the word actually means "hard times"[5] or times of stress.

[1] Kenneth S. Wuest, Word Studies from the Greek New Testament (Grand Rapids, Michigan: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Company, 1973), p. 143.

[2] John Wesley, Commentary on the New Testament (Grand Rapids, Michigan: Baker Book House, 1972), in loco.

[3] Carl Spain, Commentary on 1,2Timothy and Titus (Austin, Texas: R.B. Sweet, 1970), p. 138.

[4] H. D. M. Spence, Ellicott's Commentary on the Holy Bible, Vol. VIII (Grand Rapids, Michigan: Zondervan Publishing House, 1970), p. 232.

[5] Kenneth S. Wuest, op. cit., p. 143.

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Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
Bibliographical Information
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on 2 Timothy 3:1". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/2-timothy-3.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

This know also,.... That not only men of bad principles and practices are in the churches now, as before described in the preceding chapter, but that in succeeding ages there would be worse men, if possible, and the times would be still worse; this the apostle had, and delivered by a spirit of prophecy, and informed Timothy, and others of it, that he and they might be prepared for such events, and fortified against them:

that in the last days perilous times shall come; "or hard" and difficult times to live in; not by reason of the outward calamities, as badness of trade, scarcity of provisions, the ravages of the sword, &c. but by reason of the wickedness of men, and that not of the profane world, but of professors of religion; for they are the persons afterwards described, who will make the times they live in difficult to others, to live soberly, righteously, and godly; the days will be evil, because of these evil men: or they will be "troublesome" times, very afflicting and distressing to pious minds; as the places and times, and men and customs of them were to Lot, David, Isaiah, and others: and also "dangerous" ones to the souls of men; who will be beguiled by their fair speeches, and specious pretences, to follow their pernicious ways, which will bring destruction upon them; their doctrines will eat as a gangrene, and their evil communications will corrupt good manners, before observed. And these times will be "in the last days" of the apostolic age, and onward to the end of the world: the Jews generally understand by this phrase, when used in the Old Testament, the days of the Messiah; and which are the last days of the world, in comparison of the times before the law, from Adam to Moses, and under the law, from thence to Christ; and even in the times of the apostles, at least towards the close of them, great numbers of men rose up under the Christian name, to whom the following characters well agree, as the Gnostics, and others; and who paved the way for the man of sin, the Romish antichrist, whose priests and votaries are here likewise described to the life: so that these last days may take in the general defection and apostasy of the church of Rome, as well as those times, which followed the apostles, and those which will usher in the second coming of Christ. The Ethiopic version renders it, "in the latter days will come an evil, or bad year".

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on 2 Timothy 3:1". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/2-timothy-3.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

This 1 know also, that in the last days perilous times shall come.

(1) The seventh admonition: we may not hope for a Church in this world without corruption: but there will be rather great abundance of most wicked men even in the very bosom of the Church, who will nonetheless make a show and countenance of great holiness, and charity.
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Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on 2 Timothy 3:1". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/2-timothy-3.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

2 Timothy 3:1-17. Coming evil days: Signs of evil already: Contrast in the doctrine and life of Paul, which Timothy should follow in accordance with his early training in Scripture.

alsoGreek, “but.”

last days — preceding Christ‘s second coming (2 Peter 3:3; Judges 1:18). “The latter times,” 1 Timothy 4:1, refer to a period not so remote as “the last days,” namely, the long days of papal and Greek anti-Christianity.

perilous — literally, “difficult times,” in which it is difficult to know what is to be done: “grievous times.”

shall comeGreek, “shall be imminent”; “shall come unexpectedly” [Bengel].

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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on 2 Timothy 3:1". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/2-timothy-3.html. 1871-8.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

Know this (τουτο γινωσκεtouto ginōske). See note on 1 Corinthians 11:3; Philemon 1:12.

In the last days (εν εσχαταις ημεραιςen eschatais hēmerais). See note on James 5:3 and 1 Timothy 4:1.

Grievous (χαλεποιchalepoi). Hard. See Ephesians 5:16.

Shall come (ενστησονταιenstēsontai). Future middle of ενιστημιenistēmi (intransitive use), old verb, to stand on or be at hand, as in 2 Thessalonians 2:2.

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The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)
Bibliographical Information
Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on 2 Timothy 3:1". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/2-timothy-3.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Vincent's Word Studies

d Comp. the beginning of Philemon href="/desk/?q=phm+1:12&sr=1">Philemon 1:12; and θέλω δὲ ὑμᾶς εἰδέναι Iwould you should know, 1 Corinthians 11:3.

In the last days ( ἐπ ' ἐσχάταις ἡμέραις )

The phrase only here in Pastorals, Acts 2:17, James 5:3. Similar expressions are ἐν καιρῷ ἐσχάτῳ inthe last season, 1 Peter 1:5: ἐπ ' ἐσχάτου τῶν χρόνων atthe last of the times, 1 Peter 1:20: ἐπ ' ἐσχάτου χρόνου atthe last time, Judges 1:18: ἐπ ' ἐσχάτων τῶν ἡμερῶν atthe last of the days, 2 Peter 3:3: ἐν ὑστέροις καιροῖς inthe latter seasons, 1 Timothy 4:1. The times immediately preceding Christ's second appearing are meant. Comp. Hebrews 1:2; James 5:3.

Perilous times ( καιροὶ χαλεποί )

Only here and Matthew 8:28. Lit. hard times: schwere Zeiten. Καιρός denotes a definite, specific season. See on Matthew 12:1; see on Acts 1:17.

Shall come ( ἐνστήσονται )

Or will set in. Mostly in Paul. Only here in Pastorals. See on Galatians 1:4.

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Vincent, Marvin R. DD. "Commentary on 2 Timothy 3:1". "Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/vnt/2-timothy-3.html. Charles Schribner's Sons. New York, USA. 1887.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

This know also, that in the last days perilous times shall come.

In the last days — The time of the gospel dispensation, commencing at the time of our Lord's death, is peculiarly styled the last days. Grievous - Troublesome and dangerous.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
Bibliographical Information
Wesley, John. "Commentary on 2 Timothy 3:1". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/2-timothy-3.html. 1765.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

Знай же. Подобными словами апостол хотел еще больше привлечь внимание Тимофея. Ведь, когда дела идут, как нам бы хотелось, мы успокаиваемся, а ощущение нужды внушает нам бдительность. Поэтому Павел учит, что Церковь будет подвержена разным невзгодам, требующим от пастырей редкостную веру, усердие, бдение, благоразумие и стойкость. Он как бы заповедует Тимофею приготовиться к предстоящим нелегким сражениям, связанным с самыми великими хлопотами. Отсюда мы узнаем, что нам подобает не уступать подобным трудностям или устрашаться ими, а скорее, напротив, собраться с духом для их преодоления.

Под последними днями апостол разумеет вселенское состояние Христианской Церкви. Он не сравнивает свое время с нашим, но скорее учит тому, в каком состоянии окажется Христово Царство. Ибо многие воображают себе незнамо какой блаженный, свободный от всякой скорби мир. Апостол же вкратце дает понять, что дела в евангельские времена будут идти не столь хорошо, чтобы все виды порока оказались подавлены, а все добродетели расцветали. Поэтому пастыри Христианской Церкви будут иметь дело с нечестивыми и преступными людьми ничуть не меньше, чем с ними имели дело пророки и благочестивые священники. А отсюда, в свою очередь, следует, что время для отдыха пока не наступило.

 

 

 

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Calvin, John. "Commentary on 2 Timothy 3:1". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/2-timothy-3.html. 1840-57.

Scofield's Reference Notes

know

Apostasy, Summary: Apostasy, "falling away," is the act of professed Christians who deliberately reject revealed truth

(1) as to the deity of Jesus Christ, and

(2) redemption through His atoning and redeeming sacrifice 1 John 4:1-3; Philippians 3:18; 2 Peter 2:1. Apostasy differs from error concerning truth, which may be the result of ignorance Acts 19:1-6 or heresy, which may be due to the sphere of Satan 2 Timothy 2:25; 2 Timothy 2:26 both of which may consist with true faith. The apostate is perfectly described in 2 Timothy 4:3; 2 Timothy 4:4. Apostates depart from the faith, but not from the outward profession of Christianity 2 Timothy 3:5. Apostate teachers are described in; 2 Timothy 4:3; 2 Peter 2:1-19; Judges 1:4; Judges 1:8; Judges 1:11-13; Judges 1:16.

Apostasy in the church, as in Israel Isaiah 1:5; Isaiah 1:6; Isaiah 5:5-7 is irremediable, and awaits judgment; 2 Thessalonians 2:10-12; 2 Peter 2:17; 2 Peter 2:21; Judges 1:11-15; Revelation 3:14-16.

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These files are considered public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available in the Online Bible Software Library.
Bibliographical Information
Scofield, C. I. "Scofield Reference Notes on 2 Timothy 3:1". "Scofield Reference Notes (1917 Edition)". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/srn/2-timothy-3.html. 1917.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

1 This know also, that in the last days perilous times shall come.

Ver. 1. Perilous times] Gr. καιροι χαλεποι, hard times. Hard hearts make hard times. Eiusmodi tempera descripsit (saith Casaubon of Tacitus, and the same may we say of St Paul) quibus nulla unquam aut virtutum steriliora, aut virtutibus inimiciora; he describeth these last and loosest times of the world, barren of virtues, but abounding with vices. There was never any but Noah, that with two faces saw both before and behind. But that Ancient of days, to whom all things are present, hath here told us that the last shall be the worst.

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Bibliographical Information
Trapp, John. "Commentary on 2 Timothy 3:1". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/2-timothy-3.html. 1865-1868.

Sermon Bible Commentary

2 Timothy 3:1

Christian Use of the Old Testament.

We stop at the last epistle of Paul to Timothy with something of the same interest with which one pauses at the last hamlet of the cultivated valley when there is nothing but moor beyond. It is the end, or all but the end, of our real knowledge of primitive Christianity; there we take our last distinct look around; further, the mist hangs thick, and few and distorted are the objects that we can discern in the midst of it.

I. But this last distinct view is overcast with gloom. "In the last days perilous times shall come." Then there follows a picture of what men would be, who in word and form were Christians, but indeed led the lives of the worst heathens. But the Apostle relies that Timothy would in his own generation struggle against this evil, because he had from a child been familiar with that revelation of God which is profitable for the teaching of truth and for the removing of error, for correcting all that was amiss, and fostering every seed of good in us, for the perfecting of God's servants in all good works. This is St. Paul's testimony to the importance of the Scriptures of the Old Testament, when as yet the truths of Christ's Gospel were known more by the hearing of the Apostle's teaching than by the teaching of their written words.

II. The predominant characteristic of the Old Testament is awe. In it we see one thing above all others insisted on, the worship of God and the keeping of His law. God is everywhere exalted; whilst the wisdom, the glory, the power, and the pretended righteousness of man, are all humbled in the dust together. Is not this the very impression which we need, in order to go with true and wholesome feelings to the cross of Christ? The Old Testament makes us understand that as the law of faith exalts most highly the law of works, so the law of works, on the other hand, is no less the highest and only true exaltation of the law of faith in Christ Jesus.

T. Arnold, Sermons, vol. vi., p. 245.


References: 2 Timothy 3:1-16.—Expositor, 1st series, vol. x., p. 365. 2 Timothy 3:4.—G. Johnson, Christian World Pulpit, vol. xxxii., p. 36. 2 Timothy 3:4-17.—H. W. Beecher, Ibid., vol. i., p. 154; Preacher's Monthly, vol. v., p. 193. 2 Timothy 3:5.—Homilist, vol. v., p. 131; J. S. Pearsall, Christian World Pulpit, vol. vi., p. 193; J. H. Hitchens, Ibid., vol. xxvi., p. 284; Clergyman's Magazine, vol. i., p. 28; vol. iii., p. 11. 2 Timothy 3:10-17.—H. W. Beecher, Christian World Pulpit, vol. xi., p. 148. 2 Timothy 3:13.—Preacher's Monthly, vol. ix., p. 103. 2 Timothy 3:14.—Clergyman's Magazine, vol. iii., p. 80. 2 Timothy 3:14, 2 Timothy 3:15.—Ibid., vol. ii., p. 1.

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Nicoll, William R. "Commentary on 2 Timothy 3:1". "Sermon Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/sbc/2-timothy-3.html.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

2 Timothy 3:1. This know also, What follows is thought by some to contain part of the prophesy concerning the grand apostacy which was to happen in the latter times. If we keep our eye too closely upon the place, and consider what is here said alone, and without comparing it with what St. Paul had said and written to Timothy before, we shall perhaps doubt whether this refers to any other time than that in which the apostle wrote; or, at the furthest, to the time which was immediately to succeed. But if we enlarge our view, and take in the whole compass of what he has said about the great apostacy, and endeavour to put ourselves in the situation in which the apostle and the evangelist then were, we shall probably see things ina very different light: see 2 Thessalonians 2:7. 1 Timothy 4:1; 1 Timothy 4:16 from a comparison of which places it will appear, that he is here prophesying of the same grand apostacy as was there foretold. Besides, he never says that this prophesy concerning the dreadful times which were to come, was then fulfilled; but on the contrary, 2 Timothy 3:13.—he shews that the mystery of iniquity was then only beginning to work, and these wicked men and impostors would grow still worse, deceiving others as well asthemselves: and in Ch. 2 Timothy 4:3-4 after he had bid Timothyuse his utmost diligence, he intimates, that there was still a future time, when men would not endure sound doctrine; and charges Timothy to do what he could to prevent any steps toward that amazing scene of wickedness.

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Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on 2 Timothy 3:1". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/2-timothy-3.html. 1801-1803.

Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament

As if our apostle had said "O my son Timothy, be not thou discouraged, neither let any of thy successors be dismayed, at the sects and schisms, at the heresies and blasphemies, at the vice and impiety, which will be found in and among persons in the last days, when certainly know, that perilous times shall come; where, by the last days, understand all the times from Christ's first coming in the flesh, to his second coming to judgment; in the beginning of times several sorts of persons, yea, several sects and parties of men, arose, to whom the following characters did belong; namely, proud, covetous, boasters, and the like.

As the judaizing teachers, who urged the necessity of circumcision, and the observation of the ceremonial law; also the Gnostics, and followers of Simon Magus, have these characters applied to them in those early days; and it were well if the church of Rome, in these latter days, could clear herself of these characters, which are found upon her, as the marks and badges of an apostate church.

Learn hence, 1. That the days we now live in are the last days, and our times the last times.

2. That the last times are, and will be, the worst times, perilous times, full of sin and full of trouble. Old age is the dregs of life, the world draws upon its lees, the dregs are apparent: In the last days perilous times shall come.

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Burkitt, William. "Commentary on 2 Timothy 3:1". Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wbc/2-timothy-3.html. 1700-1703.

Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary

1.] But (the contrast is in the dark prophetic announcement, so different in character from the hope just expressed) this know, that in the last days (see 1 Timothy 4:1, where the expression is somewhat different. The period referred to here is, from all N. T. analogy (cf. 2 Peter 3:3; Jude 1:18), that immediately preceding the coming of the Lord. That day and hour being hidden from all men, and even from the Son Himself, Mark 13:32,—the Spirit of prophecy, which is the Spirit of the Son, did not reveal to the Apostles its place in the ages of time. They, like the subsequent generations of the Church, were kept waiting for it, and for the most part wrote and spoke of it as soon to appear; not however without many and sufficient hints furnished by the Spirit, of an interval, and that no short one, first to elapse. In this place, these last days are set before Timotheus as being on their way, and indeed their premonitory symptoms already appearing. The discovery which the lapse of centuries and the ways of providence have made to us, χρονίζει ὁ κύριός μου ἐλθεῖν, misleads none but unfaithful servants: while the only modification in the understanding of the premonitory symptoms, is, that for us, He with whom a thousand years are as one day has spread them, without changing their substance or their truth, over many consecutive ages. Cf. ref. 1 John,—where we have the still plainer assertion, ἐσχάτη ὥρα ἐστίν) grievous times shall come (we can hardly express ἐνστήσονται nearer in English: ‘instabunt,’ of the Vulg., though blamed by De W., is right, in the sense in which we use ‘instant’ of the present month or year (Ellic. quotes Auct. ad Herenn. ii. 5, ‘dividitur (tempus) in tempora tria, præteritum, instans, consequens’); ‘aderunt’ of Grot. and Bengel amounts in fact to the same. See note on 2 Thessalonians 2:2):

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Alford, Henry. "Commentary on 2 Timothy 3:1". Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hac/2-timothy-3.html. 1863-1878.

Heinrich Meyer's Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament

2 Timothy 3:1. Consequent on the previous exhortations we have a foreshadowing of the evil state of things in the future.

τοῦτο δὲ γίνωσκε] Even if the plural γινώσκετε be the correct reading, it does not follow that the epistle was directed to others beside Timothy; when an exhortation is general in nature, there is nothing strange in an extension of the point of view.

ὅτι ἐν ἐσχάταις ἡμέραις] comp. 1 Timothy 4:1; Grotius wrongly translates: posthac. It denotes a definite period, not, however (as in Acts 2:17; Hebrews 1:1), the present, the time between the appearance of Christ in the flesh and His second coming to judgment (Heydenreich), nor the time in which the errors shall come to an end (Mack), but the time immediately preceding Christ’s παρουσία, in which time, according to apostolic prophecy, the might of the wicked one shall be fully revealed in order to be completely overcome; comp. 2 Peter 3:3; Jude 1:18.

ἐνστήσονται] ἐνίστημι, as an intransitive verb, has the sense of “be near at hand,” but in such a way that it passes over into the sense of “be present;” thus in Romans 8:38, 1 Corinthians 3:22, ἐνεστῶτα and μέλλοντα stand in sharp antithesis as “things present” and “things future.” Bengel therefore is correct: aderunt. The same is the case with the Latin instare; hence there is no ground for finding fault with the Vulg. “instabunt” (de Wette), since in the future something future was denoted. Luther is not quite exact: “will come.”

καιροὶ χαλεποί] de Wette: “critical times;” καιρός is not simply the time, but the state of things at the time.

The next verses show in what way these καιροί will show themselves to be χαλεποί.

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Meyer, Heinrich. "Commentary on 2 Timothy 3:1". Heinrich Meyer's Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hmc/2-timothy-3.html. 1832.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

2 Timothy 3:1. τοῦτο δὲ γίνωσκε, but know this) The apostle’s statement is quite distinct, 1 Timothy 4:1.— ἐν ἐσχάταις ἡμέραις, in the last days) which had at that time begun to be, 2 Timothy 3:5, at the end. A similar expression is found at 2 Peter 3:3; Jude 1:18.— ἐνστήσονται) shall come unexpectedly. The future, in respect of prophecies that had gone before.— καιροὶ χαλεποὶ, perilous times) when it will be difficult to discover what should be done.

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Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on 2 Timothy 3:1". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/2-timothy-3.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

2 TIMOTHY CHAPTER 3

2 Timothy 3:1-5 The apostle foretelleth the evil characters that

should appear in the last days.

2 Timothy 3:6-9 He describeth the enemies of the truth,

2 Timothy 3:10-13 propoundeth unto Timothy his own example,

2 Timothy 3:14-17 and exhorteth him to abide in the doctrine he had

learned, commending unto him the manifold use of the

Holy Scriptures.

We met with this term,

last days, 1 Timothy 4:1, and

there said that the Scripture by that term understands all the time

from Christ’s ascension to the end of the world. We meet with the

term, Genesis 49:1 Isaiah 2:2 Micah 4:1 Acts 2:17 Hebrews 1:2 James 5:3 2 Peter 3:3.

Hebrews 1:2, that that whole period of time is so called.

Perilous times shall come; in the Greek it is, difficult times,

that is, times when it will be difficult for Christians to keep their

lives or estates, or any happy station in the world, with a good

conscience, by reason of the plenty of ill men that should live in

those times, and make them so difficult.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on 2 Timothy 3:1". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/2-timothy-3.html. 1685.

Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture

последние дни Здесь говорится о нашей эпохе, времени после первого Пришествия Господа Иисуса. См. примечания к 1 Тим. 4:1.

времена тяжкие Слово «тяжкие» употреблено для описания жестокости характера двух одержимых бесами людей (Мф. 8:28). Слово «времена» относится скорее к эпохе, чем к часам или календарному времени. Подобная жестокая, опасная эра (или эпоха, по мере приближения Второго Пришествия Христа) будет отмечена увеличением зла (ст. 13). Век переполнен опасными учениями церкви, набирающими силу с приближением конца. Ср. Мф. 7:15; 24:11, 12, 24; 2Пет. 2:1, 2.

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MacLaren, Alexander. "Commentary on 2 Timothy 3:1". Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mac/2-timothy-3.html.

Justin Edwards' Family Bible New Testament

In the last days; see note to 1 Timothy 4:1.

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Edwards, Justin. "Commentary on 2 Timothy 3:1". "Family Bible New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/fam/2-timothy-3.html. American Tract Society. 1851.

Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary

CONTENTS

The Apostle in this Chapter, foretells of perilous Times. He speaks of certain Enemies of the Truth: and closeth with a warm Recommendation of the Holy Scriptures, as making wise unto Salvation.

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Hawker, Robert, D.D. "Commentary on 2 Timothy 3:1". "Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pmc/2-timothy-3.html. 1828.

Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible

‘But know this, that in the last days grievous times will come.’

Paul now calls on the Old Testament idea of ‘the last days’ in order to point to what is constantly emphasised in the Scriptures that at the same time as God is accomplishing His anticipated saving work and calling His people to Himself, there will also be times of trouble and distress (e.g. Isaiah 24:16-20; Isaiah 26:20; Malachi 4:1-3 and often). Salvation is to emerge out of suffering (Isaiah 48:10; Malachi 3:3). This idea occurs so often in the Old Testament that it can be seen as a central theme of Scripture.

The Jews saw everything in terms of two ages, the present age which would result in ‘the Day of the Lord’, a time when God wrought His judgmental change on the world, which would be followed by the golden age, the future age of glory and plenty, later thought of in terms of the age of the Messiah. They overlooked or ignored the prophecies that revealed that the Coming One would have to suffer at the hands of men (e.g. Isaiah 50:3-8; Isaiah 52:13 to Isaiah 53:12; Zechariah 13:7). When Jesus came He took up the idea and claimed that in Him the new age had come, an age in which the Coming One would suffer and rise again, salvation and deliverance would commence, and His people would be ‘gathered in’ (made into a church), but all in the midst of suffering. Thus salvation and suffering would march forward hand in hand. That is what His disciples describe as ‘the last days’, ‘the end of the ages’ (see Acts 2:17; 1 Corinthians 10:11) because it is the culmination of the former age.

The fact that ‘the end times’ began at the resurrection is clearly stated in Scripture (Acts 2:17). Thus Paul can declare to his contemporaries ‘these things (in the Old Testament) -- were written for our admonition, on whomthe end of the ageshas come’ (1 Corinthians 10:11). Peter likewise declares that ‘He was revealedat the end of the timesfor your sake’ (1 Peter 1:20), and can then warn his readers ‘the end of all thingsis at hand’ (1 Peter 4:7). So to both Paul and Peter the first coming of Christ has begun ‘the end times’. The writer to the Hebrews also tells us ‘He hasin these last daysspoken to us by His Son’ (Hebrews 1:1-2), and adds ‘once inthe end of the ageshas He appeared to put away sin by the sacrifice of Himself’ (Hebrews 9:26-28). The early writers are, therefore, at one in seeing their days (and our days) as ‘the last days’ (Acts 2:17), for this age is seen as the culmination of all the days that have gone before and as leading up to the end. Then it is to be followed by the final Judgment and the heavenly Kingdom, when all the ideas of peace and plenty will be fulfilled.

That Paul did not intend his words here to be seen as a prophecy concerning a distant future comes out very clearly in that he applies it very specifically to Timothy’s own time (from 2 Timothy 3:6 onwards the present tense is used). His actual words may well be a citation from a hymn or a recent ‘prophetic teaching’, based on an interpretation of Old Testament prophecies such as Deuteronomy 31:29 - ‘evil will befall you in the last days’; Jeremiah 30:24 or Daniel 10:14. For as Peter makes clear, ‘the last days’ (en tais eschatais hemerais) were already seen as having arrived (Acts 2:17; compare Hebrews 1:1-3).

‘The last days’ (here in 2 Timothy it is ‘en eschatais hemerais’) are regularly mentioned in the Old Testament. See Isaiah 2:2 LXX (en tais eschatais hemerais); Genesis 49:1; Deuteronomy 31:29; Hosea 3:5; Micah 4:1; Jeremiah 30:24 (LXX Jeremiah 37:24); Daniel 10:14 (LXX - ep eschatown town hemerown). Comparison of Isaiah 2:2 with Micah 4:1 demonstrates that the two phrases are basically equivalent. The last days were thus to be days both of blessing for the people of God and anguish for the whole world. The word translated ‘grievous’ carries within it the suggestion of menace and danger. The growth of God’s Kingly Rule throughout these ‘last days’ would face fervent opposition (compare Matthew 13:36-43).

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Pett, Peter. "Commentary on 2 Timothy 3:1". "Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible ". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pet/2-timothy-3.html. 2013.

Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable

Paul had given Timothy some instruction concerning the apostasy of the last days in his first epistle ( 1 Timothy 4:1-3). Now he gave much more. The "last days" refers to the days preceding the Lord"s return for His own (i.e, the Rapture). [Note: Kelly, p193; Earle, p406.] They are "last" not because they are few but because they are the final days of the present age. In another sense the entire inter-advent age constitutes the last days (cf. Hebrews 1:2). [Note: Lea, p223.] Timothy was already in the last days, but they would continue and grow worse. These times would be "difficult" for all, especially faithful Christians. A list of19 specific characteristics of these days follows.

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Constable, Thomas. DD. "Commentary on 2 Timothy 3:1". "Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dcc/2-timothy-3.html. 2012.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

2 Timothy 3:1. In the last days. The words imply, as do many other passages in the New Testament, the belief that the end of the world’s history was not far off, that the then state of the world presented signs of its approach. So we have ‘it is the last time’ in 1 John 2:18, and St. Paul’s words implying that the end might come in the lifetime of the generation then living (1 Thessalonians 4:15; 1 Corinthians 15:51). History has baffled that expectation, but the permanent truth remains that, as elsewhere, ‘prophecy hath springing and germinant accomplishments.’ So here, phenomena of evil, like those described by St. Paul, bring on one of those days of the Lord that are preludes of the final judgment.

Perilous. Better, ‘grievous.’ The idea is that of distress rather than danger.

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Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on 2 Timothy 3:1". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/2-timothy-3.html. 1879-90.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Know. Do not be troubled at the many evils, persecutions, and heresies, which rise up against the Church. There have ever existed such since the Church was first established, and such ever will exist. Did not Jannes and Mambres rise up against Moses? (Calmet) See 1 Timothy iv. 1.; 2 Peter iii. 3.; Jude 18. --- That in the last days. It only signifies hereafter. And the advice St. Paul give to Timothy, (ver. 5.) now these avoid; shews that some of those false teachers should come in St. Timothy's days. We may observe that few agree exactly in translating or expounding the sense of so many Greek or Latin words, which express the vices of such heretics; but the difference is so small, that it need not be taken notice of. (Witham)

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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on 2 Timothy 3:1". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/2-timothy-3.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

know. App-132.

in. Greek. en. App-104.

last days. See Acts 2:17.

perilous = hard, difficult, grievous. Greek. chelepos, Only here and Matthew 8:28.

times = seasons. App-196.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on 2 Timothy 3:1". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/2-timothy-3.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

This know also, that in the last days perilous times shall come.

The indications of the future increase as we approach the close. After the Gospel doctrines have been put in the clearest light in the letters, the shadows deepen on the history. The last inspired words of Sts. Paul, Peter, John, and Jude form the prelude to the Apocalypse. The gospels (Acts 1:1) set forth what "Jesus began both to do and teach" on earth; the Acts and letters, what He went on to do and teach from heaven; the Apocalypse is the closing testimony of Jesus, ending with His return from heaven to earth.

Also - Greek, 'but:' in contrast to present evils (2 Timothy 2:25-26).

Last days - preceding Christ's second coming (2 Peter 3:3; Jude 1:18). "The latter times" (1 Timothy 4:1) refer to a period not so remote as "the last days" - namely, the long mediaeval times of Papal and Greek anti-Christianity.

Perilous, [ chalepoi (Greek #5467)] - 'difficult, embarrassing times,' in which it is difficult to know how to meet the dangers, spiritual and temporal.

Shall come, [ ensteesontai (Greek #1764)] - 'shall be present unexpectedly.'

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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on 2 Timothy 3:1". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/2-timothy-3.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

III.

(1) This know also.—Better rendered, But know this. The Apostle had warned Timothy (2 Timothy 2:3-13) not to allow fear of oncoming peril and trouble to paralyse his efforts in the Master’s cause, for the Lord’s true servant should never lose heart, and then had proceeded (2 Timothy 2:14-26) to detail how these efforts of his were to be directed, showing him how his teaching should stand in contrast with that of the false teachers. St. Paul now (2 Timothy 3:1), having told him that although there was no reason to fear, yet warns him that grave dangers to the Church would surely arise, and that God’s servants, like Timothy, must be prepared to combat.

In the last days.—The majority of commentators have referred “the last days” here spoken of to the period immediately preceding the second coming of the Lord—a day and an hour somewhere in the future but hidden, not merely from all men, but from the angels, and even from the Son (Mark 13:32).

It seems, however, more in accordance with such passages as 1 John 2:18 : “Little children, it is the last time”—where the present, and not an uncertain future is alluded to—to understand “the last days “as that period, probably of very long duration, extending from the days of the first coming of Messiah—in which time St. Paul lived—to the second coming of Christ in judgment. The Jewish Rabbis of the days of St. Paul were in the habit of speaking of two great periods of the world’s history—“this age,” and “the age to come.” The former of these, “this age,” including all periods up to Messiah’s advent; the latter, “the age to come,” including all periods subsequent to the appearance of Messiah. We find the same idea embodied later in the Talmud (treatise “Sanhedrim”) 6,000 years are mentioned as the duration of the world, 2,000 years, waste or chaos, 2,000 years under the law, 2,000 years the days of Messiah.” This last period, “the days of Messiah,” are often alluded to by the Hebrew prophets under the expression, “in the last days”—literally, in the end of days. (See Isaiah 2:2; Hosea 3:5; Micah 4:1.) The words of 2 Timothy 3:5, “from such turn away,” would require certainly a strained interpretation if we are to suppose that the “last days” referred to a time immediately preceding the end, or, in other words, the last period of the Christian era. The sad catalogue of vices is, alas, one with which all ages of the Church of Christ has been too well acquainted. The Christian teacher has no need to look forward to a future time of deeper iniquity, when in the Church of the living God will be found those who will deserve the dreary titles of this passage. The Church of his own age will supply him with examples of many such, for “In a great house . . . are there not only vessels of gold and silver, but also of wood, and earth, and some to honour and some to dishonour.”

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on 2 Timothy 3:1". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/2-timothy-3.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

This know also, that in the last days perilous times shall come.
in
4:3; Genesis 49:1; Isaiah 2:2; Jeremiah 48:47; 49:39; Ezekiel 38:16; Daniel 10:14; Hosea 3:5; Micah 4:1; 1 Timothy 4:1; 2 Peter 3:3; 1 John 2:18; Jude 1:17
perilous
Daniel 7:8,20-25; 8:8-14; 11:36-45; 12:1,7,11; 2 Thessalonians 2:3-12; 1 Timothy 4:1-3; Revelation 8:1-17
Reciprocal: Numbers 24:14 - the latter;  Deuteronomy 31:29 - corrupt yourselves;  Psalm 37:18 - the days;  Psalm 102:23 - He weakened;  Isaiah 5:20 - them;  Ezekiel 18:24 - and doeth;  Daniel 2:28 - in the;  Daniel 11:34 - cleave;  Amos 5:13 - an evil;  Matthew 18:7 - for;  John 16:13 - he will show;  Acts 1:7 - It;  2 Corinthians 11:3 - so;  Philippians 3:2 - evil;  1 Timothy 1:19 - which;  2 Peter 2:1 - even;  Revelation 9:1 - a star;  Revelation 11:2 - it is;  Revelation 16:13 - three;  Revelation 17:5 - mystery

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on 2 Timothy 3:1". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/2-timothy-3.html.

Stanley Derickson - Notes on Selected Books

Week 8

2 Timothy 3:1-7

A FAITHFUL SERVANT IS SEPARATED

"3:1 This know also, that in the last days perilous times shall come. 2 For men shall be lovers of their own selves, covetous, boasters, proud, blasphemers, disobedient to parents, unthankful, unholy, 3 Without natural affection, trucebreakers, false accusers, incontinent, fierce, despisers of those that are good, 4 Traitors, heady, highminded, lovers of pleasures more than lovers of God; 5 Having a form of godliness, but denying the power thereof: from such turn away. 6 For of this sort are they which creep into houses, and lead captive silly women laden with sins, led away with divers lusts, 7 Ever learning, and never able to come to the knowledge of the truth."

"This know also, that in the last days perilous times shall come."

Little did Paul know of the twenty-first century! He was speaking of what he saw on the horizon relating to the Roman Empire and its ways with people. He had his own experiences to relate to the subject as well.

I think we can all look forward and tell our children that we too are in perilous times and that further bad times are on the horizon. This doesn"t take a prophet, only someone with open eyes and half a mind.

Within the church I personally see perilous times. We have some really false teaching in some of the movements. We have major compromise of life in some of our movements. To see trouble for the church is simply looking at the facts.

We all know that the truth that will encourage in all of this is that Christ said there is nothing that will prevail against the church. This was not only a promise from almighty God but it was also a prophecy based on the decrees of God - don"t think we need to worry about the church ultimately - it will survive. It already has had its ups and downs, but it is moving forward as the Lord directs.

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Bibliographical Information
Derickson, Stanley. "Commentary on 2 Timothy 3:1". "Stanley Derickson - Notes on Selected Books". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/sdn/2-timothy-3.html.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

III. PREDICTION OF THE APOSTASY AT THE CLOSE OF THE APOSTOLIC AGE, AND CONFIRMATION OF TIMOTHY AGAINST IT, 2 Timothy 3:1-17.

1. False and demoralized character of the coming heretics, 2 Timothy 3:1-9.

1.This know—Of this prediction we may note, 1. That 2 Timothy 3:5 shows that the apostasy described was to be in the Church; and, 2. That it should be in Timothy’s time. 3. 2 Timothy 3:9 shows that the apostasy would be exposed (not cut off) by the second advent of Christ. 4. The whole, with 2 Timothy 4:6, shows that it is to take place after St. Paul’s departure, (as in Acts 20:29, uttered to this same Ephesus,) and so at the close of the apostolic age.

Last days—Note, 1 Timothy 4:1.

PerilousDifficult times for a Timothy to deal with.

Shall come—Shall gradually set in.

 

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Bibliographical Information
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on 2 Timothy 3:1". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/2-timothy-3.html. 1874-1909.

The Expositor's Greek Testament

2 Timothy 3:1. : Although St. Paul had abandoned his once confident expectation that the Lord would come again during his own lifetime, it is plain that here, as in 1 Timothy 4:1, he regards the time now present as part of the last days. See , 2 Timothy 3:5-6. The prophetical form of the sentence is a rhetorical way of saying that things are going from bad to worse. The same account is to be given of 2 Peter 3:3; Judges 1:18. St. John says plainly, “It is the last hour” (1 John 2:18). See note on 1 Timothy 4:1.

: will be upon us, instabunt (Vulg.).

: grievous (R.V.); but not necessarily perilous (A.V.) to those who feel their grievousness.

 

 

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Bibliographical Information
Nicol, W. Robertson, M.A., L.L.D. "Commentary on 2 Timothy 3:1". The Expositor's Greek Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/2-timothy-3.html. 1897-1910.

The Bible Study New Testament

1. Remember this. “I have told you before about the apostasy which is taking place (Ephesians 4:14; 2 Thessalonians 2:7).There will be difficult times. See note on 1 Timothy 4:1. The entire Christian Age is called the last days in Acts 2:16-17. It does not mean the last days of the world, because Timothy was already fighting these things (1 Timothy 6:3-5; etc.). But Paul may also have in mind the prophecies of Christ (Matthew 24:4-22and notes).

 

 

 

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Bibliographical Information
Ice, Rhoderick D. "Commentary on 2 Timothy 3:1". "The Bible Study New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ice/2-timothy-3.html. College Press, Joplin, MO. 1974.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

1But know this By this prediction he intended still more to sharpen his diligence; for, when matters go on to our wish, we become more careless; but necessity urges us keenly. Paul, therefore informs him, that the Church will be subject to terrible diseases, which will require in the pastors uncommon fidelity, diligence, watchfulness, prudence, and unwearied constancy; as if he enjoined Timothy to prepare for arduous and deeply anxious contests which awaited him. And hence we learn, that, so far from giving way, or being terrified, on account of any difficulties whatsoever, we ought, on the contrary. to arouse our hearts for resistance.

In the last days Under “the last days,” he includes the universal condition of the Christian Church. Nor does he compare his own age with ours, but, on the contrary, informs Timothy what will be the future condition of the kingdom of Christ; for many imagined some sort of condition that would be absolutely peaceful, and free from any annoyance. (182) In short, he means that there will not be, even under the gospel, such a state of perfection, that all vices shall be banished, and virtues of every kind shall flourish; and that therefore the pastors of the Christian Church will have quite as much to do with wicked and ungodly men as the prophets and godly priests had in ancient times. Hence it follows, that there is no time for idleness or for repose.

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Bibliographical Information
Calvin, John. "Commentary on 2 Timothy 3:1". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/2-timothy-3.html. 1840-57.