Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

2 Timothy 3:12

Indeed, all who desire to live godly in Christ Jesus will be persecuted.
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Afflictions and Adversities;   Minister, Christian;   Paul;   Persecution;   Wicked (People);   Thompson Chain Reference - Church;   Persecution;   Suffering for Righteousness' S;   The Topic Concordance - Godliness;   Persecution;   Suffering;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Afflictions;   Gospel, the;   Persecution;  
Dictionaries:
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Holy spirit;   Persecution;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Godly, Godliness;   Persecution;   Timothy, First and Second, Theology of;   Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Jesus Christ;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Suffering;   Titus, Epistle to;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Comfort;   Godliness;   Suffering;   Timothy and Titus Epistles to;   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Perilous Times;  
Encyclopedias:
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Persecution;   Suffering;  
Devotionals:
Daily Light on the Daily Path - Devotion for September 1;   Every Day Light - Devotion for November 4;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

All that will live godly - So opposite to the spirit and practice of the world is the whole of Christianity, that he who gives himself entirely up to God, making the Holy Scriptures the rule of his words and actions, will be less or more reviled and persecuted. "If religion gives no quarter to vice, the vicious will give no quarter to religion and its professors."

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Bibliographical Information
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on 2 Timothy 3:12". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/2-timothy-3.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Yea, and all that will live godly in Christ Jesus shall suffer persecution - Paul takes occasion from the reference to his own persecutions, to say that his case was not unique. It was the common lot of all who endeavored to serve their Redeemer faithfully; and Timothy himself, therefore, must not hope to escape from it. The apostle had a particular reference, doubtless, to his own times; but he has put his remark into the most general form, as applicable to all periods. It is undoubtedly true at all times, and will ever be, that they who are devoted Christians - who live as the Saviour did - and who carry out his principles always, will experience some form of persecution. The “essence” of persecution consists in “subjecting a person to injury or disadvantage on account of his opinions.” It is something more than meeting his opinions by argument, which is always right and proper; it is inflicting some injury on him; depriving him of some privilege, or right; subjecting him to some disadvantage, or placing him in less favorable circumstances, on account of his sentiments.

This may be either an injury done to his feelings, his family, his reputation, his property, his liberty, his influence; it may be by depriving him of an office which he held, or preventing him from obtaining one to which he is eligible; it may be by subjecting him to fine or imprisonment, to banishment, torture, or death. If, in any manner, or in any way, he is subjected to disadvantage on account of his religious opinions, and deprived of any immunities and rights to which he would be otherwise entitled, this is persecution. Now, it is doubtless as true as it ever was, that a man who will live as the Saviour did, will, like him, be subjected to some such injury or disadvantage. On account of his opinions, he may be held up to ridicule, or treated with neglect, or excluded from society to which his attainments and manners would otherwise introduce him, or shunned by those who might otherwise value his friendship. These things may be expected in the best times, and under the most favorable circumstances; and it is known that a large part of the history of the world, in its relation to the church, is nothing more than a history of persecution. It follows from this:

(1) that they who make a profession of religion, should come prepared to be persecuted. It should be considered as one of the proper qualifications for membership in the church, to be willing to bear persecution, and to resolve not to shrink from any duty in order to avoid it.

(2) they who are persecuted for their opinions, should consider that this may be one evidence that they have the spirit of Christ, and are his true friends. They should remember that, in this respect, they are treated as the Master was, and are in the goodly company of the prophets, apostles, and martyrs; for they were all persecuted. Yet,

(3) if we are persecuted, we should carefully inquire, before we avail ourselves of this consolation, whether we are persecuted because we “live godly in Christ Jesus,” or for some other reason. A man may embrace some absurd opinion, and call it religion; he may adopt some mode of dress irresistibly ludicrous, from the mere love of singularity, and may call it “conscience;” or he may be boorish in his manners, and uncivil in his deportment, outraging all the laws of social life, and may call this “deadness to the world;” and for these, and similar things, he may be contemned, ridiculed, and despised. But let him not infer, “therefore,” that he is to be enrolled among the martyrs, and that he is certainly a real Christian. That persecution which will properly furnish any evidence that we are the friends of Christ, must be only that which is “for righteousness sake” Matthew 5:10, and must be brought upon us in an honest effort to obey the commands of God.

(4) let those who have never been persecuted in any way, inquire whether it is not an evidence that they have no religion. If they had been more faithful, and more like their Master, would they have always escaped? And may not their freedom from it prove that they have surrendered the principles of their religion, where they should have stood firm, though the world were arrayed against them? It is easy for a professed Christian to avoid persecution, if he yields every point in which religion is opposed to the world. But let not a man who will do this, suppose that he has any claim to be numbered among the martyrs, or even entitled to the Christian name.

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Bibliographical Information
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on 2 Timothy 3:12". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/2-timothy-3.html. 1870.

The Biblical Illustrator

2 Timothy 3:12

All that will live godly in Christ Jesus shall suffer persecution.

A Christian is not a favourite with the world

Who can help admiring the frankness of Scripture? It shows us the difficulties as well as the enjoyments of religion; the sacrifices it requires, as well as the rewards it insures. This is perfectly just, and in every way profitable.

I. The life described. It may be taken with two distinctions.

1. It is not merely a moral life, but a godly one. We by no means depreciate morality. A man cannot be religious without being moral, but he may be moral without being religious. It is well to be a good master, a good neighbour, a good subject--but how are you disposed towards God?

2. It is not merely a godly life, but a Christian one. We are not only to live godly, but to live godly “in Christ Jesus;” i.e., in all our religious concerns--To be governed by the revelation of Jesus Christ--To be conformed to the example of Jesus Christ--To be actuated by the grace of Jesus Christ--And to depend on the mediation of Jesus Christ.

II. The condition announced as the consequence of the life described. “Shall suffer persecution.”

1. That ever since the Fall there has been an irreconcilable enmity between the “seed of the woman and the seed of the serpent”; that “man being alienated from the life of God,” loves nothing that reminds him of God; that the tempers and actions of the righteous necessarily reprove and upbraid the wicked; that their endeavours to save disturb them in their sins; that the gospel condemns the worldly as well as the vicious, and the formal as well as the negligent; that, as there is nothing in Christianity that flatters sin, so there is nothing that flatters self; and that every man is naturally as self-righteous as he is depraved.

2. To this we may add another source of the inevitableness of persecution. It is taken from the Christian himself. Suffering is necessary for his trial and his triumph. Without this how could he prove that he loves God better than friendship, reputation, wealth, or life? How could he overcome evil with good? It is warfare that makes a good soldier. A Christian is like the firmament, and it is the darkness of affliction that makes his starry graces to shine out. He is like those herbs and plants that best effuse their odours when bruised.

Concluding reflections:--

1. There are some who suffer persecution that do not live godly in Christ Jesus. The people of the world cannot easily distinguish between “the form of godliness and the power,” and therefore the pretending and the sincere frequently fare alike. The hypocrite loses heaven for the sake of earth, and earth for the sake of heaven, and is of all creatures the most miserable.

2. With what caution and prayer should we assume a profession of religion!

3. If any man suffer as a Christian, let him not be ashamed, but let him glorify God on this behalf. It gives you an opportunity to prove your thankfulness for His goodness, and your adherence to His gospel.

4. But what shall we say to persecutors? If you feel enmity against the godly, and would injure them were it in your power, it is “a token of perdition.” You may now be placed above them in circumstances; and may love to misrepresent and to vilify them. But “their Redeemer is mighty.” He is “near that justifieth them.” He “will plead their cause.” He that “toucheth them, toucheth the apple of His eye.” (W. Jay.)

Persecution of Christians by the world

The greater part of our sufferings are not distinguishable from the common afflictions of life; and many of the trials that some foolish professors frequently charge on religion, religion would teach them to avoid, if its admonitions were regarded. But, on the other hand, it must be allowed--

1. That human nature is essentially the same in every age; and that a tiger may be chained and not changed. Under every form of government “the heart is deceitful above all things, and desperately wicked.” And where there is a strong active propensity against anything (as, in this case, there must be against real godliness), it will show itself as opportunity offers; and such opportunity there must be in a world like this.

2. That persecution admits of various degrees. It includes every kind of injury or vexation, from a fiery stake to a scornful sneer. How often has genuine religion produced the loss of friendship, or chilled the warmth of attachment into cold civility! Where power is possessed, it is frequently exerted as far as safety or a regard to appearances will allow. This is seen in the attempts of husbands, parents, and masters, to restrain from following their religious convictions their wives, their children, and their servants. With regard to relations, a Christian will sometimes find a greater trim in their affections than in their frowns. Here is a mother, in all other respects tender and kind; she takes her daughter aside, and weeps to think she should favour a doctrine “everywhere spoken against.”

3. If modern Christians frequently escape persecution, may it not be asked whether, in many instances, it does not arise from their less fully exemplifying the spirit of their religion than the primitive Christians did?

A good man a good mark for the arrow

The better the man, the sooner persecuted; the devil shoots his arrows at the whitest marks. (T. Hall, B. D.)

A good man a miracle of preservation

It is a miracle of mercy to consider how the lily subsists in the midst of so many briars and thorns, how the Lord’s wheat grows in the midst of so many tares, how His doves live in the midst of so many birds of prey, and His lambs in the midst of so many roaring lions. Were not the Almighty her defence, those bands of ungodliness would soon destroy her. (T. Hall, B. D.)

God honoured by His suffering servants

Hereby we honour God, and so bring honour to ourselves. God hath much honour by His suffering servants, when out of love to Him they can sacrifice their lives and estates for Him. God glories in such; as He suffers in their sufferings so He triumphs in their conquests. (T. Hall, B. D.)

Best when worst

God is pleased to reserve the sweetest manifestations from the bitterest afflictions. The fountain runs most sweetly when the cistern is broken. When comforts are most needed they will be most prized. The traveller in summer, when the sun shines, casts off his cloak, but in winter, or when the wind blows hard, he wraps it closer to him. So when we bathe ourselves in creature comforts we value not the promises of God, but when we are stripped of all then we look after God. When the salt waters are dried up, then there are fresh springs in God. (T. Hall, B. D.)

The good man happy in adversity, the bad man miserable in prosperity

See the happiness of a child of God. Take him at worst, and he is better than a wicked man at best. The one in prosperity hath no joy, the other in adversity is full of joy. (T. Hall, B. D.)

Brave martyrdom

At Perth, in 1554, there were three male prisoners and one woman--Helen Stirk--put to death for their adherence to the gospel of Jesus. The latter was taken to see her husband suffer before she followed him. They embraced under the gallows. “Husband,” she said, “we have lived together many joyful days; but this day in which we must die ought to be most joyful to us both, because we must have joy for ever. Therefore I will not bid you good-night. Certainly we shall meet again in the kingdom of heaven.” The executioners seized their prey, and she, too, was then led away to be drowned. When she reached the water’s edge she gave the child to a nurse, she was hurled in, and the justice of the Church was satisfied.

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These files are public domain.
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Bibliographical Information
Exell, Joseph S. "Commentary on "2 Timothy 3:12". The Biblical Illustrator. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tbi/2-timothy-3.html. 1905-1909. New York.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

Yea, and all that would live godly in Christ Jesus shall suffer persecution.

The absence of persecution, in any active sense, from the lives of most Christians of this era is generally due to the watered-down version of their Christianity and not to any subsidence of the savage hatred of the darkness for the light. Besides that, persecutions today are manifested much more indirectly. Promotions are withheld, invitations are denied, and a snickering unpopularity are the daily portion of many precious souls working in a hostile, atheistic environment. Given the right conditions, such oppositions would be just as deadly as the great Roman persecutions.

Why does the world hate Christians? "Because ye are not of the world ... therefore the world hateth you" (John 15:19; Matthew 10:22,38,39). In the light of this warning from the Saviour, no Christian should be surprised at persecution. The doctrine of the necessity of persecution was no new thing to Paul. Luke recorded the very words spoken on the mission field long ago, "Through many tribulations we must enter into the kingdom of God" (Acts 14:22); and, in the words of White, "Consistency in the life of Christ must necessarily be always opposed by the world."[21] See also under 1 Thessalonians 3:3.

ENDNOTE:

[21] Newport J. D. White, op. cit., p. 173.

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Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
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Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on 2 Timothy 3:12". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/2-timothy-3.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Yea, and all that will live godly in Christ Jesus,.... All that live according to the will of God revealed in his word; and to the glory of God, as the end of all their actions; and which the grace of God in the Gospel, and in their own hearts, teaches them; and who have the principles of a godly life from Christ, and derive the fresh supplies of grace and life from him, to maintain it; in whom their life is hid, and who live by faith upon him; all such that live, and that will live so, are desirous of living after this manner; in whom God has wrought in them both to will and to do, and are concerned when it is otherwise with them: these

shall suffer persecution; it is the will of God, and the appointment of heaven; Christ has foretold it, that so it shall be; and he the head has suffered it himself, and it is necessary that his members should, that they may be conformed unto him; it is the way Christ himself went to glory, and through many tribulations his people must enter the kingdom; and this is the common lot and certain case of all the saints, in one shape or another; for though all do not suffer confiscation of goods, beating, scourging, imprisonment, or a violent death; yet all are more or less afflicted and distressed by wicked men, and are subject to their reproaches and revilings, which are a branch of persecution; and that for professing Christ, and living a godly life in him and under his influence: and since such suffer as Christians, and not as evildoers; and this is the common condition of the people of God, in this world, it should not be thought strange, but be cheerfully endured; to encourage to which is the apostle's view in this passage.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on 2 Timothy 3:12". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/2-timothy-3.html. 1999.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

Yea, and — an additional consideration for Timothy: if he wishes to live godly in Christ, he must make up his mind to encounter persecution.

that will, etc.Greek, “all whose will is to live,” etc. So far should persecution be from being a stumbling-block to Timothy, he should consider it a mark of the pious. So the same Greek is used of the same thing, Luke 14:28, Luke 14:33, “intending (Greek,wishing‘) to build a tower  …  counteth the cost.”

live godly in Christ — (Galatians 2:20; Philemon 1:21). There is no godliness (Greek, “piously”) or piety out of Christ. The world easily puts up with the mask of a religion which depends on itself, but the piety which derives its vigor directly from Christ is as odious to modern Christians as it was to the ancient Jews [Bengel].

shall suffer persecution — and will not decline it (Galatians 5:11). Bishop Pearson proves the divine origination of Christianity from its success being inexplicable on the supposition of its being of human origin. The nature of its doctrine was no way likely to command success: (1) it condemns all other religions, some established for ages; (2) it enjoins precepts ungrateful to flesh and blood, the mortifying of the flesh, the love of enemies, and the bearing of the cross; (3) it enforces these seemingly unreasonable precepts by promises seemingly incredible; not good things such as afford complacency to our senses, but such as cannot be obtained till after this life, and presuppose what then seemed impossible, the resurrection; (4) it predicts to its followers what would seem sure to keep most of the world from embracing it, persecutions.

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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on 2 Timothy 3:12". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/2-timothy-3.html. 1871-8.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

That would live godly (οι τελοντες ζηιν ευσεβωςhoi thelontes zēin eusebōs). “Those who desire (will, determine) to live godly.” Paul does not regard his experience as peculiar, but only part of the price of loyal service to Christ.

Shall suffer persecution (διωχτησονταιdiōchthēsontai). Future passive of διωκωdiōkō “shall be persecuted” (shall be hunted as wild beasts).

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The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)
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Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on 2 Timothy 3:12". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/2-timothy-3.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Vincent's Word Studies

Who will live ( οἱ θέλοντες ζῇν )

Whose will is to live, or who are bent on living.

Godly ( εὐσεβῶς )

Only here and Titus 2:12. Comp. κατ ' εὐσέβειαν accordingto godliness, 1 Timothy 6:3; Titus 1:1; and ἐν πάσῃ εὐσεβείᾳ inall godliness, 1 Timothy 2:2. See also 1 Timothy 4:7; 1 Timothy 6:11, and on godliness, 1 Timothy 2:2.

Shall suffer persecution ( διωχθήσονται )

In this sense only here in Pastorals.

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Vincent, Marvin R. DD. "Commentary on 2 Timothy 3:12". "Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/vnt/2-timothy-3.html. Charles Schribner's Sons. New York, USA. 1887.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

Yea, and all that will live godly in Christ Jesus shall suffer persecution.

All that are resolved to live godly — Therefore count the cost. Art thou resolved? In Christ - Out of Christ there is no godliness.

Shall suffer persecution — More or less. There is no exception. Either the truth of scripture fails, or those that think they are religious, and are not persecuted, in some shape or other, on that very account, deceive themselves.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
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Wesley, John. "Commentary on 2 Timothy 3:12". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/2-timothy-3.html. 1765.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

Да и все. Поскольку ранее апостол упоминал о выпавших на его долю гонениях, теперь он добавляет, что все произошедшее с ним также ожидает всех благочестивых. Он говорит это отчасти для того, чтобы верующие приготовились покориться подобной участи, отчасти же для того, чтобы они не подозревали его в чем-то плохом из-за переносимых им преследований. Ведь несправедливый суд весьма часто следует за неправедным поведением. И того, к кому менее благосклонны люди, в народе вскоре сочтут неугодным также и Богу. Поэтому Павел в этой обобщающей фразе причисляет себя к детям Божиим и одновременно увещевает других детей Божиих приготовиться к претерпеванию гонений. Ведь, если этот закон предписывается всем желающим благочестиво жить во Христе, от Христа неизбежно отрекаются люди, хотящие гонений избегнуть. Напрасно мы будем пытаться отделить Господа Иисуса от Его же креста, в то время как для мира вполне естественно ненавидеть Христа в том числе и в членах Его тела. Спутницей же ненависти является жестокость, а от нее происходят гонения. Итак, будем знать, что мы остаемся христианами с одним условием: нам предстоит пройти через многочисленные скорби и битвы.

Но спрашивается: должны ли все тогда становится мучениками? Ибо, как известно, многие благочестивые никогда не подвергались изгнанию, тюремному заключению, никогда не находились в бегах и не испытывали никаких гонений. Отвечаю: сатана преследует рабов Христовых не одним лишь способом. Но все же мир неизбежно будет тем или иным образом враждовать против них всех для упражнения их в вере и проверки их стойкости. Ибо сатана, будучи вечным врагом Христовым, не потерпит, чтобы кто- либо из Ему принадлежащих был в спокойствии всю жизнь, и отверженные будут всегда колоть нас своими стрекалами. Больше того, как только в человеке обнаруживается рвение по Богу, ярость нечестивых тут же воспламеняется. И даже если нечестивые и не всегда обнажают меч, они все равно изблевывают свой яд в ропоте, в проклятиях, в смутах или каким-либо иным образом. Поэтому, хотя благочестивые и не испытывают одни и те же нападки, не ведут одну и ту же битву, ратная служба у них все же одинаковая. Они никогда не пребудут в полном спокойствии, никогда не будут избавлены от всех гонений.

 

 

 

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Calvin, John. "Commentary on 2 Timothy 3:12". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/2-timothy-3.html. 1840-57.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

12 Yea, and all that will live godly in Christ Jesus shall suffer persecution.

Ver. 12. Yea, and all that will live] Carry they the matter never so discreetly, they must suffer. Many dream of a delicacy, they conceit a godly life without persecution. These would pull a rose without pricks. Armat spina rosas, mella tegunt apes. (Boetius.) Thucydides complains of his countrymen, that none of them would ταλαιπωρειν δια το καλον, suffer aught for goodness’ sake. Too few there are that today will do so.

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on 2 Timothy 3:12". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/2-timothy-3.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

2 Timothy 3:12. Yea, and all that will live godly, &c.— This may import something peculiar to the godliness to be exercised by Christians, as being agreeable to the revelation of Christ, animated by his example, and dependant on his Spirit for assistance, and his atonement for acceptance with God:—important topics, upon which all who desire to obtain and promote godliness, ought to dwell much.

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Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on 2 Timothy 3:12". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/2-timothy-3.html. 1801-1803.

Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary

12.] Yea, and (or, and moreover. I have explained this καὶδέ on 1 Timothy 3:10. ‘They who will, &c., must make up their minds to this additional circumstance,’ viz. persecution) all who are minded (purpose: see reff.: ‘whose will is to,’ Ellic.: hardly so strong as ‘who determine,’ Conyb. Nor can it be said that θέλοντες is emphatic, as Huth. It requires its meaning of ‘purpose’ to be clearly expressed, not slurred over: but that meaning is not especially prominent) to live piously (ref.) in Christ Jesus (‘extra Jesum Christum nulla pietas,’ Beng.: and this peculiar reference of εὐσέβεια (cf. 1 Timothy 3:16) should always be borne in mind in these Epistles) shall be persecuted.

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Alford, Henry. "Commentary on 2 Timothy 3:12". Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hac/2-timothy-3.html. 1863-1878.

Charles Simeon's Horae Homileticae

DISCOURSE: 2255

THE TRUE GOSPEL HATED

2 Timothy 3:12. All that will live godly in Christ Jesus shall suffer persecution.

WE are apt to imagine that persecution for righteousness’ sake was peculiar to the apostolic age: but St. Paul, reminding Timothy of the various trials which he himself had endured, tells him, that the Gospel would continue to give offence, wherever it was faithfully preached, or consistently professed; and that “all who would live godly in Christ Jesus should suffer persecution.” Now, that we may enter into the true import of these words, and see their full scope, I will shew,

I. What is the life which is here described—

[The Apostle does not say, “All that will live godly:” for then his assertion would not be true. A conformity to the law, under which men live, will by no means give offence to those around them. Heathens, of every class and of every caste, will admire those who are most scrupulously observant of the rites prescribed by their religious system — — — The Pharisees were held in the highest estimation on account of the self-denying ordinances which they practised. And papists are canonized for their penances and pilgrimages, and self-imposed austerities. Even amongst us, an exact attention to outward forms and to moral duties will gain for any man the admiration of all around him. This is not the life which will, in the general, expose us to persecution, whatever it may do under some particular circumstances. The life that will involve us certainly in persecution, is, “the living godly in Christ Jesus;” that is, the depending on him for all the grace whereby to serve our God, and the giving to him the glory of all that we do. This is what the Gospel invariably requires — — — and this will still give the very same offence which it gave in former days. This it was which so incensed Cain against his brother Abel. Abel offered a burnt-offering as an acknowledgment of his dependence on the sacrifice of Christ, which should, in due time, be offered: and God’s attested approbation of that offering stirred up in Cain the murderous purpose to destroy his brother’s life. St. Paul, and all the rest of the Apostles, suffered on the same account [Note: 1 Timothy 4:10.] — — — And at this day, wherever that religion is professed and exemplified, the very same hatred prevails against it — — — Other doctrines cause no divisions: but wherever salvation by faith in the atoning blood of Christ is proclaimed, there is a division among the people; “some saying of the preacher, He is a good man: others saying, Nay, but he deceiveth the people.”]

If this be so, it is of importance to shew, in reference to this doctrine,

II. Why it gives such universal offence—

It offends,

1. Because it is so incomprehensible in its nature—

[A preacher of Christ crucified, whilst he calls men to the performance of good works, will maintain most strenuously the impossibility of our being ever justified by them, either in whole or in part. He requires all to seek acceptance with God through faith alone — — — Now, people in general neither do, nor can, comprehend this. If we are not to be justified by our works in any measure or degree, why need we perform them? — — — Thus they stumble at that very stumbling-stone which offended the Jews of old, and caused them to reject the salvation which the less moral Gentiles most thankfully accepted [Note: Romans 9:30-33.] — — —]

2. Because it is so humiliating in its requirements—

[What! must the most exemplary Pharisee, who has been “touching the righteousness of the law blameless,” renounce all his own righteousness, and come down upon the very same ground with publicans and harlots, and “enter in at the strait gate” of repentance and faith, as much as the most abandoned of mankind? Who can endure to hear that, or make up his mind to comply with it? What! after having done so many things, must I seek acceptance solely through the righteousness of another imputed to me? Such views were, in the days of old, “to the Jews a stumbling-block, and to the Greeks foolishness [Note: 1 Corinthians 1:23.]:” and such will they be judged by all, who are not truly enlightened by the Spirit of God — — —]

3. Because it is so exclusive in its pretensions—

[If the Apostle would have suffered circumcision to be retained by the Jews as a joint ground of hope before God, “the offence of the cross would have altogether ceased.” Or if he would have suffered the name of Jesus to be enrolled among the gods of Greece and Rome, the Gentiles would have entirely renounced their opposition to him. But he required that the whole world should abandon their various grounds of hope; and trust exclusively in “the Lord Jesus Christ, as their wisdom, and righteousness, and sanctification, and redemption.” He declared, that there was no way to heaven but through Christ; and that “if an angel from heaven should preach any other doctrine than this, he must he accursed [Note: Galatians 1:8-9.].” This is the testimony which we also bear; and which every one who receives the Gospel must accede to. And can we wonder that this rigid and immoveable purpose should give offence? Can we wonder, that, when we require every child of man to bow to this doctrine, and inflexibly to adhere to it, even though he were menaced with death for his fidelity—can we wonder, I say, that men should rise up against us, and endeavour to extinguish the light which we set before them? It cannot be but that such authoritative demands should give offence to those who have not obtained grace to comply with them — — —]

Let me then address,

1. Those who are intimidated by the opposition made to them—

[“Fear not man, who can only kill the body; but fear Him who can destroy both body and soul in hell.” “If you will not lay down your life for Christ, you cannot be his disciples.” We cannot lower those terms. Christ died, under the wrath of God, for you: and it is but a small sacrifice, in comparison, that he requires you to make for him.]

2. Those who set themselves against the truth of God—

[You can never prevail, in fighting against God: or, if you prevail in any particular instance, you only aggravate so much the more your own guilt and condemnation. It were better for you to have a millstone fastened to your neck, and be cast into the depths of the sea, than that you should offend one of Christ’s little ones.]

3. Those who are enabled to maintain their steadfastness in the midst of an ungodly world—

[Perhaps you have suffered somewhat for the Lord. But have you found any cause to regret it? Have not the consolations of Christ abounded above all your afflictions? You may possibly have yet more to suffer for his sake. But, for your encouragement, he has declared, that, “whilst he will deny those who deny him, he will admit all who suffer with him to reign with him in glory for ever and ever [Note: 2 Timothy 2:12.].” “Be then faithful unto death; and expect assuredly, at his hands, a crown of life.”]

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Simeon, Charles. "Commentary on 2 Timothy 3:12". Charles Simeon's Horae Homileticae. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/shh/2-timothy-3.html. 1832.

Heinrich Meyer's Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament

2 Timothy 3:12. The principle here laid down is intended, like the mention of Timothy’s conduct in 2 Timothy 3:11, to incite Timothy to willing endurance of suffering.

καὶ πάντες δέ] καὶδέ, see 1 Timothy 3:10.

οἱ θέλοντες] is here emphatic: “they whose thoughts are thus directed.”

ζῆν εὐσεβῶς] the adverb εὐσεβῶς only here and in Titus 2:12.

ἐν χριστῷ ἰησοῦ] denotes the pious life as Christian in its nature; but it is to be observed that, according to the apostolic view, true εὐσέβεια is possible only in communion with Christ. Bengel: extra Jesum Christum nulla pietas. Hofmann unsuitably remarks that the emphasis should not be on ἐν χρ. ἰησ., but on εὐσεβῶς, for ζῆν εὐσεβῶς ἐν χρ. ἰησ. forms only one idea: that of the Christian life of piety.

διωχθήσονται] expresses the certainty: Christian piety cannot continue without persecution, because the world is hostile to the kingdom of God; comp. John 15:19-20; Matthew 10:22; Matthew 10:38, and other passages. Wiesinger rightly remarks: “Not to comfort himself does the apostle say this, but to show that his experience was a universal one, as something necessarily bound up with εὐσεβῶς ζῆν,” and, it should be added, to give encouragement to Timothy.

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Meyer, Heinrich. "Commentary on 2 Timothy 3:12". Heinrich Meyer's Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hmc/2-timothy-3.html. 1832.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

2 Timothy 3:12. καὶ πάντες δὲ, yea and all) all, and they alone. The third mark, to have persecutors; so far should persecution be from being a stumbling-block to any one. At the beginning of persecution, it does not yet appear that that is the mark of an apostle: it at length appears from the help that is afforded, and from the endurance of them. In this, however, is the third mark of an apostle: ὑπομονὴ, patience, is a great thing in the eyes of the apostle; he prefers it to all the others. All other things may be taken from a man, so that he may suffer their utter loss and he himself fall away; but when he has ὑπομονὴ, all things are preserved. Hence Timothy might at the same time gather that he would also suffer persecution. There is a similar transition from Paul to all godly men, ch. 2 Timothy 4:8.— οὶ θέλοντες, those wishing or willing) Consider therefore whether you are willing; comp. the word wishing (intending), Luke 14:28. Even a persevering will has a beginning.— εὐσεβῶς ζῇν) to live godly; the whole energy of their life being devoted to Christian piety, Philippians 1:21.— ζῇν, to live) to pass life, Galatians 2:14.— ἐν χριστῷ in Christ) There is no godliness out of Christ Jesus. [And indeed the world easily wears that mask of religion which depends on itself; but the piety which flourishes directly from Jesus Christ is very hateful, as it was to the old Jews, so to the modern Christians, who are without any token of good.—V. g.]— διωχθήσονται, shall suffer persecution) Nor will they indeed refuse it, Galatians 5:11. They shall proceed to worse and worse, 2 Timothy 3:13, stands in opposition to this future.

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Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on 2 Timothy 3:12". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/2-timothy-3.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Such is the disposal of Divine Providence, such the malice of the men in the world, that though not every individual person, yet it is the usual lot of them who will keep a pure faith and a good conscience, to suffer persecution in some kind or other, either in their persons, or reputation, or estates. Men may live profanely, or may be morally honest men, and be safe enough; but if they will profess faith in Christ, or love to him in keeping his commandments, they will be exposed to troubles: the world will not endure men to live in peace, that will not live as they live, and believe as they believe.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on 2 Timothy 3:12". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/2-timothy-3.html. 1685.

Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture

все, желающие жить благочестиво во Христе Иисусе, будут гонимы Верные христиане должны ожидать преследований и мучений от рук отвергающего Христа мира (ср. Ин. 15:18-21; Деян. 14:22).

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MacLaren, Alexander. "Commentary on 2 Timothy 3:12". Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mac/2-timothy-3.html.

Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible

‘Yes, and all who would live godly in Christ Jesus will suffer persecution.’

And he must not think that such suffering and persecution is only true of Paul. It is indeed true of all who would live genuine Christian lives in spiritual oneness with Christ (‘in Christ’), that is, who would live ‘godly’ (in worshipful fellowship with God) in Christ Jesus. This was what the Master Himself had emphasised (Matthew 5:10-12; Matthew 10:16-22; John 16:2-3), and Paul constantly taught. When the Thessalonians experienced problems Paul had written to them, saying, "When we were with you, we told you beforehand that we were to suffer affliction, just as it has come about, and as you know" (1 Thessalonians 3:4). And when he returned after the first missionary journey to visit the churches he had founded, he "strengthened the souls of the disciples, exhorting them to continue in the faith, and saying that through many tribulations we must enter the Kingly Rule of God" (Acts 14:22).

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Pett, Peter. "Commentary on 2 Timothy 3:12". "Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible ". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pet/2-timothy-3.html. 2013.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

2 Timothy 3:12. All that will live godly. The Greek is emphatic, ‘all who purpose,’ ‘all whose will is’ to live godly. The general axiom is clearly intended to remind Timothy that there is no test by which a man can satisfy himself whether he lives piously, so sure as the question whether he is or is not, in some way or other, persecuted.

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Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on 2 Timothy 3:12". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/2-timothy-3.html. 1879-90.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

will. App-102.

live. App-170.

godly Greek eusabos. Only here and Titus 2:12.

Christ Jesus. App-98.

suffer persecution = be persecuted.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on 2 Timothy 3:12". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/2-timothy-3.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

Yea, and all that will live godly in Christ Jesus shall suffer persecution.

Yea, and - an additional consideration. If Timothy wishes to live godly in Christ, he must make up his mind to encounter persecution.

That will, [ hoi (Greek #3588) thelontes (Greek #2309)] - 'all whose will is (decided) to live,' etc. So far from being a stumblingblock, Timothy should consider persecution a mark of the pious. So Luke 14:28; Luke 14:33, "intending [ theloon (Greek #2309)] to build a tower ... counteth the cost."

Live godly in (union with) Christ (Galatians 2:20; Philippians 1:21). There is no godliness out of Christ. The world puts up with the mask of a religion which stops short there; but the piety which derives its vigour directly from Christ is as odious to modern Christians as it was to the ancient Jews (Bengel).

Shall suffer persecution - and will not decline it, (Matthew 10:22; John 15:20; Galatians 5:11; 1 Thessalonians 3:3 : cf. Sirach 2:1, etc.) Dr. Pearson proves the divine origination of Christianity from its success being inexplicable on the supposition of its human origin. Its doctrine was in no way likely to command success:

(1) It condemned all other religions, some established for ages;

(2) It enjoins precepts ungrateful to flesh and blood-mortifying of the flesh, love of enemies, and bearing of the cross;

(3) It enforces these seemingly unreasonable precepts by promises seemingly incredible; not good things such as afford complacency to our senses, but such as cannot be obtained until after this life, and presuppose what seemed impossible, the resurrection;

(4) It predicts to its followers what would keep most men from embracing it, persecutions.

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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on 2 Timothy 3:12". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/2-timothy-3.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(12) Yea, and all that will live godly.—But St. Paul would not allow it to be thought for a moment that in the fact of his enduring persecution and suffering there was anything remarkable or singular; so he adds the words of this verse, which repeat in a peculiarly solemn way the great Christian truth that eternal glory was only to be reached by man through an avenue of sufferings. “No cross, no crown,” is one of the watchwords of the faith. To the statement, “all that will live godly,” it is noticeable that the Apostle adds “in Christ Jesus:” thus telling us there can be no true piety except in communion with Him. So Bengel: “Extra Jesum Christum nulla pietas.” And piety, adds St. Paul, will ever suffer persecution; for the world is at enmity with the kingdom of God. “Because ye are not of the world . . . therefore the world hateth you” (John 15:19; so, too, Matthew 10:22; Matthew 10:38-39).

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on 2 Timothy 3:12". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/2-timothy-3.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Yea, and all that will live godly in Christ Jesus shall suffer persecution.
live
2 Corinthians 1:12; 1 Timothy 2:2; 3:16; 6:3; Titus 1:1; 2:12; 2 Peter 3:11
shall
Joshua 17:14; Psalms 37:12-15; Matthew 5:10-12; 10:22-25; 16:24; 23:34; Mark 10:30; Luke 14:26,27; John 15:19-21; 16:2,33; 17:14; Acts 14:22; 1 Corinthians 15:19; 1 Thessalonians 3:3,4; Hebrews 11:32-38; 1 Peter 2:20,21; 3:14; 4:12-16; 5:9,10; Revelation 1:9,10; 7:14; 12:4,7-10
Reciprocal: Genesis 32:7 - greatly;  Joshua 10:4 - we may;  Psalm 34:19 - Many;  Mark 10:21 - take;  Luke 6:22 - when men;  Luke 9:23 - If;  2 Corinthians 6:4 - afflictions;  1 Timothy 4:7 - exercise;  Hebrews 11:25 - Choosing;  2 Peter 2:9 - the godly;  1 John 3:13 - if

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on 2 Timothy 3:12". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/2-timothy-3.html.

Stanley Derickson - Notes on Selected Books

Yea, and all that will live godly in Christ Jesus shall suffer persecution.

Now this is a bold statement of fact - not a hypothesis but his opinion of what is the expected thing. If you live godly - you will suffer persecution.

That word "will" is a present tense verb as is "live." A continued life for Christ will result in persecution. The persecution is a future tense, so it may not be immediate, but it will come.

It indicates an act of the will to decide to live for God as well as an active lifestyle following that act of the will.

Some might accidentally live for God now and then, but this is a lifestyle - a person committed to living as close to the word as is possible.

It is of note that the source of the persecution is not really specified. It might be of note to go back and see who it was that persecuted Paul - if memory serves me correctly it was the religious establishment. Yes, Acts 14:19 shows it to have been the religious establishment - the Jews. This is not all that untrue today either.

When we were on deputation, I had a short thought in our prayer letter each time relating to things I was seeing in churches that were counter to Scripture. A friend of mine was in a large church in southern California and the pastor asked him about me. They talked and ultimately the pastor said, "You know Derickson is right but he is a missionary and he doesn't have the right to say that. That is why he will never be in my church." Hummm, I thought it was Christ's church.

I suspect many would agree that the worst times come from the religious establishment that doesn't like the waves you are making. Yes, persecution will come from without, but much will come from within - a sad commentary indeed upon the establishment.

Few there are that really buck the main stream of their day. Those few that do not conform to the mainstream established religious community of the day seldom are heard of outside of their small personal geographical and ministry areas. Those that conform often are known far and wide.

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Derickson, Stanley. "Commentary on 2 Timothy 3:12". "Stanley Derickson - Notes on Selected Books". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/sdn/2-timothy-3.html.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

12.Yea—What Paul has suffered Timothy must, more or less, expect to suffer. The apostle does not invite his pupil to ease and fortune, but to trial and persecution.

All—Explicity affirmed only of the apostle’s own age, but in a greater or less degree applicable, in fact or in spirit, to all ages. Yet we are not to consider persecution a test of our piety.

Shall suffer—The simple future will suffer.

 

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on 2 Timothy 3:12". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/2-timothy-3.html. 1874-1909.

The Expositor's Greek Testament

2 Timothy 3:12. This verse is an interesting example of the effect of association of ideas. St. Paul’s teaching after his persecutions at Antioch, etc., had strongly emphasised this topic. St. Luke (Acts 14:22) actually repeats the very words used by the preachers, “Through many tribulations we must enter into the kingdom of God”. Consistency in the life in Christ must necessarily be always opposed by the world. is emphatic, as Ell. notes, “whose will is”. Cf.Luke 14:28, John 7:17.

of course qualifies , as in Titus 2:12. There is a similar extension of thought, from self to all, in 2 Timothy 4:8.

 

 

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Nicol, W. Robertson, M.A., L.L.D. "Commentary on 2 Timothy 3:12". The Expositor's Greek Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/2-timothy-3.html. 1897-1910.

The Bible Study New Testament

12. Will be persecuted. We could almost say: “God does not want you unless you want him enough to fight for Him!” Persecution makes people evaluate their love for God. Compare 1 Thessalonians 3:3; John 16:33.

 

 

 

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Ice, Rhoderick D. "Commentary on 2 Timothy 3:12". "The Bible Study New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ice/2-timothy-3.html. College Press, Joplin, MO. 1974.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

12And all who wish to live a godly life (186) Having mentioned his own persecutions, he likewise adds now, that nothing has happened to him which does not await all the godly. (187) And he says this, partly that believers may prepare themselves for submitting to this condition, and partly that good men may not view him with suspicion on account of the persecutions which he endures from wicked persons; as it frequently happens that the distresses to which men are subjected lead to unfavorable opinions concerning them; for he whom men regard with aversion is immediately declared by the common people to be hated by God.

By this general statement, therefore, Paul classes himself with the children of God, and, at the same time, exhorts all the children of God to prepare for enduring persecutions; for, if this condition is laid down for “all who wish to live a godly life in Christ,” they who wish to be exempt from persecutions must necessarily renounce Christ. In vain shall we endeavor to detach Christ from his cross; for it may be said to be natural that the world should hate Christ even in his members. Now hatred is attended by cruelty, and hence arise persecutions. In short, let us know that we are Christians on this condition, that we shall be liable to many tribulations and various contests.

But it is asked, Must all men be martyrs? for it is evident that there have been many godly persons who have never suffered banishment, or imprisonment, or flight, or any kind of persecution. I reply, it is not always in one way that Satan persecutes the servants of Christ. But yet it is absolutely unavoidable that all of them shall have the world for their enemy in some form or other, that their faith may be tried and their steadfastness proved; for Satan, who is the continual enemy of Christ, will never suffer any one to be at peace during his whole life; and there will always be wicked men that are thorns in our sides. Moreover, as soon as zeal for God is manifested by a believer, it kindles the rage of all ungodly men; and, although they have not a drawn sword, yet they vomit out their venom, either by murmuring, or by slander, or by raising a disturbance, or by other methods. Accordingly, although they are not exposed to the same assaults, and do not engage in the same battles, yet they have a warfare in common, and shall never be wholly at peace and exempt from persecutions.

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Calvin, John. "Commentary on 2 Timothy 3:12". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/2-timothy-3.html. 1840-57.