Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

3 John 1:14

but I hope to see you shortly, and we will speak face to face.
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Dictionaries:
Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Christians, Names of;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

Peace be to thee - Mayest thou possess every requisite good, both of a spiritual and temporal kind.

Our friends salute thee - Desire to be affectionately remembered to thee. Greet the friends by name - remember me to all those with whom I am acquainted, as if I had specified them by name. This is a proof to me that this epistle was not sent to Corinth, where it is not likely John ever was; and where it is not likely he had any particular acquaintances, unless we could suppose he had seen some of them when he was an exile in Patmos, an island in the Aegean Sea.

For other particulars concerning John, the reader is requested to refer to the preface to his gospel.

Instead of φιλοι and φιλους, friends, the Codex Alexandrinus and several others read αδελφοι and αδελφους, brethren. The former (friends) is a very singular appellation, and nowhere else found in Scripture; the latter is of frequent occurrence.

Subscriptions in the Versions: -

In the ancient Syriac. - Nothing.

The Third Epistle of John the apostle is ended. - Syriac Philoxenian.

Aethiopic. - Nothing.

Vulgate. - Nothing.

The end of the epistles of the pure Apostle and Evangelist John. - Arabic.

The Third Epistle of St. John the apostle is ended. - Latin text of the Complutensian.

The end of the Third catholic Epistle of St John. - Ditto, Greek text.

Subscriptions in the Manuscripts: -

The third of John. - Codd. Alex. and Vatican.

The Third catholic Epistle of John the evangelist and divine.

The third of John to Caius concerning Demetrius, of whom he witnesses the most excellent things.

I have already shown in the preface to those epistles termed catholic, that the word καθολικος is not to be taken here, and elsewhere in these epistles, as signifying universal, but canonical; for it would be absurd to call an epistle universal that was written to a private individual.

We seldom hear this epistle quoted but in the reproof of lordly tyrants, or prating troublesome fellows in the Church. And yet the epistle contains many excellent sentiments, which, if judiciously handled, might be very useful to the Church of God. But it has been the lot both of the minor prophets and the minor epistles to be generally neglected; for with many readers bulk is every thing; and, no magnitude no goodness.

This and the preceding epistle both read over in reference to a new edition, Jan. 3rd, 1832. - A. C.

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Bibliographical Information
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on 3 John 1:14". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/3-john-1.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

But I trust I shall shortly see thee … - Notes at 2 John 1:12.

Our friends salute thee - That is, your friends and mine. This would seem rather to refer to private friends of John and Gaius than to Christians as such. They had, doubtless, their warm personal friends in both places.

Greet the friends by name - That is, each one individually. He remembered them as individuals, but did not deem it proper to specify them.

Practical Remarks On 3John

(1) It is proper to desire for our friends all temporal good; to wish their happiness in every respect, 3 John 1:2. The welfare of the soul is indeed the great object, and the first desire in regard to a friend should be that his salvation may be secured; but in connection with that we may properly wish them health of body, and success in their lawful undertakings. It is not common that in their spiritual interests they are so much more prosperous than they are in other respects, that we can make that the standard of our wishes in regard to them, but it sometimes does occur, as in the case of Gaius. In such cases we may indeed rejoice with a friend, and feel that all will be well with him. But in how few cases, even among professed Christians, can we (with propriety) make the prosperity of the soul the standard by which to measure the happiness which we desire for them in other respects! Doddridge says, “What a curse would this bring upon many to wish that they might prosper even as their souls prospered!” Of how much property would they at once be deprived; how embarrassed would be their affairs; how pale, and wan, and sickly would they be, if they should be in all respects as they are in their spiritual interests!

(2) it is an unspeakable pleasure to a Christian to learn that his friends are living and acting as becomes sincere Christians; that they love what is true, and abound in the duties of hospitality charity, and benevolence, 3 John 1:3-6. When a friend learns this of a distant friend; when a pastor learns this of his people from whom be may be for a time separated; when those who have been instrumental in converting others learn this of their spiritual children; when a parent learns it of a son or daughter separated from him; when a teacher learns it of those who were formerly under his care, there is no joy that goes more directly to the heart than this - nothing that fills the soul with more true thankfulness and peace.

(3) it is the duty and the privilege of those who love the cause of religion to go and preach the gospel to those who are destitute, expecting to receive nothing from them, and doing it as a work of pure benevolence, 3 John 1:7. The missionary spirit existed early in the Christian church, and indeed may be regarded as the “prevailing” spirit in those times. It has always been the prevailing spirit when religion has flourished in the church. At such times there have been many who were willing to leave their own quiet homes, and the religious privileges connected with a well-organized church, and to break away from the ties which bind to country and kindred, and to go among a distant people to publish salvation. In this cause, and with this spirit, the apostles spent their lives. In this cause, the “brethren” referred to by John went forth to labor. In this cause, thousands have labored in former times, and to the fact that they were “willing” to do it is to be traced all the happy influence of religion in the world. Our own religious privileges now we owe to the fact that in former times there were those who were willing to “go forth taking nothing of the Gentiles,” devoting themselves, without hope of reward or fame, to the business of making known the name of the Saviour in what were then the dark places of the earth. The same principle is acted on now in Christian missions, and with the same propriety; and as we in Christian lands owe the blessings which we enjoy to the fact that in former times there were those who were willing thus to go forth, so it will be true that the richest blessings which are to descend upon India, and Africa, and the islands of the sea, will be traced in future times to the fact that there are in our age those who are willing to follow the example of the apostles in going forth to do good to a dying world.

(4) it is our duty to contribute to the support of those who thus go among the pagan, and to help them in every way in which we can promote the object which they have in view. So John felt it to be the duty of the church in regard to those who went forth in his time; and so, when the church, under the influence of Diotrephes, had refused to do it, he commended Gaius for performing that duty, 3 John 1:6, 3 John 1:8. Now, as then, from the nature of the case, missionaries to the pagan must go “taking nothing” of those among whom they labor, and expecting that, for a long time at least, they will do nothing for their support. They go as strangers. They go to those who do not believe the truth of the gospel; who are attached to their own superstitions; who contribute largely to the support of their own temples, and altars, and priesthood; who are, as yet, incapable of appreciating the value of a purer religion; who have no desire for it, and who are disposed to reject it. In many cases, the pagan to whom the missionary goes are miserably poor, and it is only this religion, which as yet they are not disposed to receive, that can elevate them to habits of industry, and furnish them with the means of supporting religious teachers from abroad. Under these circumstances, no duty is more obvious than that of contributing to the support of those who go to such places as Christian missionaries. If the churches value the gospel enough to send their brethren among the pagan to propagate it. they should value it enough to minister to their needs while there; if they regard it as the duty of any of their number to leave their comfortable homes in a Christian land in order to preach to the pagan, they should feel that those who go make far greater sacrifices than those who contribute to their support. they give up all; we give only the small sum, not diminishing our own comforts, which is necessary to sustain them.

(5) for the same reason it is our duty to contribute to the support of missionaries in the destitute places of our own land, 3 John 1:8. They often go among a people who are as destitute, and who will as little appreciate the gospel, and who are as much prejudiced against it, and who are as poor, as the pagan. They are as likely to be charged with being actuated by mercenary motives, if they ask for support, as missionaries among the pagan are. They often go among people as little able and disposed to build churches and school-houses as the pagan are. Nothing is more obvious, therefore, than that those who have the gospel, and who have learned to prize and value it in some measure is it should be, should contribute to the support of those who go to convey its blessings to others, until those to whom they go shall so learn to prize it as to be able and willing to maintain it. That, under a faithful ministry, and with the Divine blessing, will not be long; always for the gospel, when it secures a hold in a community, makes men feel that it confers infinitely more blessings than it takes away, and that, even in a pecuniary point of view, it contributes more by far than it takes. What community is more prospered, or is more rich in all that promotes the temporal welfare of man, than that where the gospel has the most decided influence?

(6) we may see from this Epistle that churches “ought” to be united in promoting the cause of religion, 3 John 1:8-9. They should regard it as a common cause in which one has as much concern as another, and where each should feel it a privilege to cooperate with his brethren. One church, in proportion to its ability, has as much interest in the spread of Christianity as another, and should feel that it has much responsibility in doing it. Between different churches there should be that measure of confidence and love that they will deem it a privilege to help each other in the common cause, and that one shall be ready to further the benevolent designs undertaken by another. In every Christian land, and among the people of every Christian denomination, missionaries of the gospel should find friends who will be willing to cooperate with them in advancing the common cause, and who, though they may bear a different name, and may speak a different language, should cheerfully lend their aid in spreading the common Christianity.

(7) we may see, from this Epistle, the evil of having one troublesome man in the church, 3 John 1:10. Such a man, by his talents, his address, his superior learning, his wealth, or by his arrogance, pride, and self-confidence, may control a church, and effectually hinder its promoting the work of religion. The church referred to by the apostle would have done its duty well enough, if it had not been for one ambitious and worldly man. No one can properly estimate the evil which one such man can do, nor the calamity which comes upon a church when such a man places himself at its head. As a man of wealth, of talents, and of learning, may do great good, if his heart is right, so may a man similarly endowed do proportionate evil if his heart is wicked. Yet how often has the spirit which actuated Diotrephes prevailed in the church! There is nothing that confers so much power on men as the control in religious matters; and hence, in all ages, proud and ambitious men have sought dominion over the conscience, and have sought to bring the sentiments of people on religion to subjection to their will.

(8) there may be circumstances where it is proper - where it is a duty - to receive those who have been cast out of the church, 3 John 1:8. The decisions of a church, under some proud and ambitious partisan leader, are often eminently unjust and harsh. The most modest, humble, devoted, and zealous men, under a charge of heresy, or of some slight aberration from the formulas of doctrine, may be cast out as unworthy to be recognized as ministers of the gospel, or even as unworthy to have a place at the table of the Lord. Some of the best men on earth have been thus disowned by the church; and it is no certain evidence against a man when he is denounced as a heretic, or disowned as a member, by those who bear the Christian name. If we are satisfied that a man is a Christian, we should receive him as such, however he may be regarded by others; nor should we hesitate to help him forward in his Christian course, or in any way to assist him to do good.

(9) finally, let us learn from the examples commended in this brief Epistle, to do good. Let us follow the example of Gaius - the hospitable Christian; the large-hearted philanthropist; the friend of the stranger; the helper of those who were engaged in the cause of the Lord - a man who opened his heart and his house to welcome them when driven out and disowned by others. Let us imitate Demetrius, in obtaining a good report of those who know us; in so living that, if the aged apostle John were still on earth, we might be worthy of his commendation, and more than all, of the approbation of that gracious Saviour before whom these good men have long since gone, and in whose presence we also must soon appear.

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Bibliographical Information
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on 3 John 1:14". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/3-john-1.html. 1870.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

but I hope shortly to see thee, and we shall speak face to face. Peace be unto thee. The friends salute thee. Salute the friends by name.

On the tenderness of the greetings here, see under 3 John 1:1:13, above.

I hope shortly to see thee ... It is usually supposed that the contemplated visit here is the same as that mentioned in 2John.

Peace be unto thee ...

This was the best wish which the apostle could form: it was our Lord's resurrection greeting, the internal peace of a good conscience, the external peace of universal fellowship, the heavenly peace of future glory, begun even in this life.[42]

The friends salute thee ... salute the friends by name ... "By name" as used here is found nowhere else in the New Testament, except in John 10:5; and many have found in this "an echo of the Good Shepherd's calling his own sheep by name, an example for under-shepherds,"[43] and a good closing note for this letter. It is the teaching of the text here that, "The salutation was to be given to each individual separately."[44]

The tremendous importance of this letter is seen in the fact that it deals with the prime sin of the ages, the seeking and the grasping on the part of evil men for the control levers of God's church on earth. The spirit of Diotrephes still rides high and mighty in the ecclesiastical counsels of the earth, denying and contradicting the holy teachings of Christ and his apostles; but the loving apostle unmasked it for what it is in the glowing lines of this precious fragment of the word of the Lord.

[42] W. M. Sinclair, op. cit., p. 502.

[43] R. W. Orr, op. cit., p. 624.

[44] Charles C. Ryrie, Wycliffe Bible Commentary, New Testament (Chicago: Moody Press, 1971), p. 1038.

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Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
Bibliographical Information
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on 3 John 1:14". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/3-john-1.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

But I trust I shall shortly see thee,.... Either at Ephesus, where John was, or rather at the place where Gaius lived, see 3 John 1:10;

and we shall speak face to face; freely and familiarly converse together about these things, which were not thought proper to be committed to writing:

peace be to thee; which was the usual form of salutation with the Jews, and John was one; See Gill on John 20:19;

our friends salute thee; or send their Christian salutation to thee, wishing all health and prosperity in soul and body; meaning the members of the church at Ephesus: the Arabic version reads, "thy friends"; such at Ephesus as had a particular knowledge of him, and affection for him. The Vulgate Latin version reads, "the friends": the members in general; and the Alexandrian copy reads, "the brethren"; and the Syriac version, our brethren: and then the epistle is closed thus,

greet the friends by name; meaning those that were where Gaius lived, to whom the apostle sends his salutation, and desires it might be delivered to each of them, as if they had been mentioned by name. This and the epistle of James are the only epistles which are concluded without the word "Amen".

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on 3 John 1:14". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/3-john-1.html. 1999.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

face to faceGreek, “mouth to mouth.”

Peace — peace inward of conscience, peace fraternal of friendship, peace supernal of glory [Lyra].

friends — a title seldom used in the New Testament, as it is absorbed in the higher titles of “brother, brethren.” Still Christ recognizes the relation of friend also, based on the highest grounds, obedience to Him from love, and entailing the highest privileges, admission to the intimacy of the holy and glorious God, and sympathizing Savior; so Christians have “friends” in Christ. Here in a friendly letter, mention of “friends" appropriately occurs.

by name — not less than if their names were written [Bengel].

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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on 3 John 1:14". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/3-john-1.html. 1871-8.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

I hope (ελπιζωelpizō) - We shall speak (λαλησομενlalēsomen). Literary plural really singular like ελπιζωelpizō to face (στομα προς στομαstoma pros stoma). As in 2 John 1:12.

Peace to thee (ειρηνη σοιeirēnē soi). Pax tibi like the Jewish greeting οι πιλοιshalōm (Luke 10:5; Luke 24:36; John 20:19, John 20:21).

The friends (κατ ονομαhoi philoi). Those in Ephesus.

By name (κατ ονομαkat' onoma). John knew the friends in the church (at Pergamum or wherever it was) as the good shepherd calls his sheep by name (John 10:3, the only other N.T. example of kat' onoma). The idiom is common in the papyri letters (Deissmann, Light, etc., p. 193, note 21).

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The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)
Bibliographical Information
Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on 3 John 1:14". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/3-john-1.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Vincent's Word Studies

Face to face

See on 2 John 1:12.

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Vincent, Marvin R. DD. "Commentary on 3 John 1:14". "Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/vnt/3-john-1.html. Charles Schribner's Sons. New York, USA. 1887.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

But I trust I shall shortly see thee, and we shall speak face to face. Peace be to thee. Our friends salute thee. Greet the friends by name.

Salute the friends by name — That is, in the same manner as if I had named them one by one. The word friend does not often occur in the New Testament, being swallowed up in the more endearing one of brother.

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Bibliographical Information
Wesley, John. "Commentary on 3 John 1:14". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/3-john-1.html. 1765.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

14 But I trust I shall shortly see thee, and we shall speak face to face. Peace be to thee. Our friends salute thee. Greet the friends by name.

Ver. 14. But I trust] He could promise nothing peremptorily, but submits to God. {See Trapp on "James 4:15"}

Face to face] As iron whets iron, so doth the face of a man his friend.

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Bibliographical Information
Trapp, John. "Commentary on 3 John 1:14". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/3-john-1.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

3 John 1:14. Greet the friends by name. St. John's saluting the faithful Christians by name, shewed his paternal and affectionate regard for them, and tended, under the divine blessing, to keep them steadfast in the truth and purity of the gospel. Comp. 1 Corinthians 16:21; 1 Corinthians 16:24.

Inferences.—How desirable, but, alas! how few are the instances of such prosperity of soul and spiritual concerns, as one would wish to be the measure of a proportional state of bodily health and success in temporal affairs! Such Christians as abound in faith and charity towards their pious acquaintance and strangers, and give substantial proofs of it in their lives, are exceeding lovely and greatly beloved, rejoiced in, caressed, and honourably spoken of as worthy of imitation, by all true friends to the gospel of Christ, and especially by his ministering servants. But how should proud, insolent imposers upon churches, and malicious revilers of the uncorrupted gospel and its faithful preachers, be detested, exposed, and censured, as open enemies to it and them, and as injurious and domineering lords over God's heritage, who will neither do good themselves, nor suffer others to do it that would! They are strangers to the true knowledge of God: but all who, from principles of faith and love, seek and do the things that please him, are his children, and ought, for his sake, to assist ministering servants in their Lord's work, that they may bear a part with them in propagating evangelical truth and the good of precious souls. To write such things as these to Christian friends, as occasions offer, is very useful: but how much more delightful and advantageous is it to converse freely together about them! May all religious affection be ever preserved among true believers, and mutual sincere wishes of every kind of happiness, both temporal and spiritual, be cultivated between them, with cordial friendship one towards another! And especially may our love abound to those who have a desire to spread the gospel. And O, that it were more universal! O, that Divine grace would excite more to quit the indulgence of their homes, or their countries, if there be no bond of duty to detain them there, that they may go and preach to the Gentiles! And, though there be no prospect of any requital from them, God will open to them his celestial treasure, and they shall be recompensed in the resurrection of the just.

REFLECTIONS.—1st, We have,

1. The inscription and salutation. The elder, John, unto the well-beloved Gaius, whom I love in the truth, as a faithful member of Jesus Christ. Beloved, I wish above all things, that thou mayest prosper, and be in health, even as thy soul prospereth; and may your success in all temporal things, and your bodily health, bear pace with your spiritual prosperity. Note; (1.) The true prosperity, and that which is most desirable, is the health of the soul. (2.) Bodily health is a singular mercy, especially as it enables us more eminently to improve our spiritual gifts and graces for the good of mankind.

2. He testifies the satisfaction that he felt in the report which he had heard. For I rejoiced greatly when the brethren came, and testified of the truth that is in thee, of thy faith and love unfeigned; even as thou walkest in the truth, adorning with all manner of holy conversation thy Christian profession. I have no greater joy than to hear that my children walk in truth. Note; It is a sincere and heartfelt delight to the faithful ministers of Christ, to behold the children whom they have begotten in the gospel, walk worthy of their vocation.

3. He commends his kind and charitable conduct. Beloved, thou doest faithfully whatsoever thou doest to the brethren, and to strangers; such hospitality and generosity are the general characteristics of thy faithful heart, and have been justly praised by those which have borne witness of thy charity before the church, and gratefully acknowledged the kindnesses which they received: whom if thou bring forward on their journey after a godly sort, and assist those itinerant preachers of the gospel who devote their time and labour to this blessed work of spreading the glad tidings through the earth, thou shalt do well, and act a noble part in thus advancing the blessed cause of our divine Redeemer; because that for his name's sake they went forth, giving up all the world, that they might devote themselves wholly to the ministry, and, with a spirit uninfluenced by any mercenary views, taking nothing of the Gentiles, but preaching the gospel of God freely. We therefore, who wish well to that service, and whom God hath blessed with ability, ought to receive such, and afford them a comfortable maintenance; that we might be fellow-helpers to the truth, and, though not ordained to be preachers, may hereby receive a preacher's reward. Note; They who devote themselves to the ministry, foregoing all worldly pursuits for the love of Christ and immortal souls, deserve every kindness at our hands that we can shew them.

2nd, The apostle,

1. Points out a man of a very different character. I wrote unto the church: but Diotrephes, who loveth to have the pre-eminence among them, and proudly to lord it over them, receiveth us not, pays no regard to our apostolic injunctions. Wherefore if, or when, I come, I will remember his deeds which he doeth, and severely animadvert upon his imperious and uncharitable conduct, prating against us with malicious words, assuming the most insolent airs, and daring even to cast reproach on the divinely-constituted apostles of the Son of God: and not content therewith, neither doth he himself receive the brethren to any hospitable entertainment in his house, and forbiddeth them that would; and, when any notwithstanding disobey his mandates, and receive, assist, and further in their way those faithful ministers of Christ, who travel preaching the gospel, he casteth them out of the church, merely for presuming to disobey his wicked commands and usurped authority. Note; (1.) Nothing is more contrary to the spirit of a Christian minister, than overbearing arrogance and pride. (2.) They are doubly wicked, who neither will do good themselves, nor suffer those to do it, who are willing.

2. He dissuades Gaius from copying so bad an example. Beloved, follow not that which is evil, but that which is good; let no height of station or office lead you to copy a bad man, but ever imitate the excellent and the generous. He that doeth good, is of God, proves that he is born of him, and partakes of his Spirit: but he that doeth evil, hath not seen God; whatever pretensions of religion he may make, he is destitute of all experimental knowledge of divine things.

3. He mentions Demetrius as an excellent man, and worthy of imitation. Demetrius hath good report of all men; all who know him bear testimony of his amiable and pious conversation; and of the truth itself, every one who would speak the truth, must acknowledge his excellence; and we, who are ministers of truth, declare our full approbation of him: and ye know that our record is true, and may be assuredly depended upon. Note;

It is a noble character indeed, so to behave as to be entitled to universal applause, and to be approved of God, and of all men of truth and integrity.

4. He concludes his epistle with the hopes of a personal interview shortly. I had many things to write, but I will not with ink and pen write unto thee; but I trust I shall shortly see thee, and we shall speak face to face, when I can more fully communicate all my mind. Peace be to thee; prosperity of every kind attend thee in body and soul. Our friends salute thee, joining in all Christian wishes. Greet the friends with thee by name, presenting to each my most affectionate remembrances.

*.* The Reader is referred to the different Authors mentioned often already.

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Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on 3 John 1:14". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/3-john-1.html. 1801-1803.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

3John 1:15. φίλους, friends) Compare John 15:15. A title seldom found in the New Testament, since it is absorbed by the greater one of brotherhood. Philosophers are mistaken in supposing that friendship is not prepared (formed) by faith.— κατʼ ὄνομα, by name) No less than if their names were written.(1)

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Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on 3 John 1:14". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/3-john-1.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Speak face to face; otoma prov stoma, viz. by oral conference, which he hoped ere long to have opportunity for. He concludes with the usual Christian salutations.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on 3 John 1:14". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/3-john-1.html. 1685.

Justin Edwards' Family Bible New Testament

Kind salutations of friends are profitable, both to those who give and those who receive them; and real kindness habitually and kindly expressed, is the essence of true politeness, the ornament of dignified refinement, and the source of pure, elevated, and purifying joy.

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Edwards, Justin. "Commentary on 3 John 1:14". "Family Bible New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/fam/3-john-1.html. American Tract Society. 1851.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

was a very usual salutation among the Jews, by which they wished every possible blessing might come upon their friends they thus saluted. (Menochius)

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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on 3 John 1:14". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/3-john-1.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

trust = hope.

I shall, &c. = to see (App-133.) thee, &c.

shortly. Greek. eutheos. Generally translated "immediately", or "straightway".

speak. App-121.

face, &c. See 2 John 1:12.

salute. Greek. aspazomai. See Acts 18:22.

Greet = Salute. Here, as in the close of so many epistles, the word aspazomai is translated by two different English words in successive verses or even in the same verse. Compare Romans 16:3-23. 1 Corinthians 16:19, 1 Corinthians 16:20; 2 Corinthians 13:12, 2 Corinthians 13:13. Philippians 1:4, Philippians 1:21. Colossians 4:10, Colossians 4:12, Colossians 4:14; 2 Timothy 4:19, 2 Timothy 4:21. Titus 3:15. 1 Peter 5:13, 1 Peter 5:14.

by. App-104.


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Bibliographical Information
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on 3 John 1:14". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/3-john-1.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

But I trust I shall shortly see thee, and we shall speak face to face. Face to face - `mouth to mouth.'

Peace - inward of conscience; fraternal of friendship; supernal of glory (Lyra). Friends. Seldom in the New Testament, as it is absorbed in the higher title, 'brother, brethren.' Still, Christ recognizes the relation of friend (John 15:13-15; James 2:23), based on the highest grounds-obedience from love, entailing the highest privileges-admission to the intimacy of the holy God and sympathizing Saviour: so Christians have "friends" in Christ. In a friendly letter, mention of "friends" appropriately occurs.

By name - no less than if their names were written (Bengel).

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Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on 3 John 1:14". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/3-john-1.html. 1871-8.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

But I trust I shall shortly see thee, and we shall speak face to face. Peace be to thee. Our friends salute thee. Greet the friends by name.
face to face
Gr. mouth to mouth. Peace.
Genesis 43:23; Daniel 4:1; Galatians 5:16; Ephesians 6:23; 1 Peter 5:14
Our
Romans 16:10,11; *marg:
friends
Greet
Romans 16:1-16 Reciprocal: Matthew 10:12 - salute it;  Acts 15:23 - greeting;  Acts 23:26 - greeting;  2 Corinthians 13:13 - GeneralPhilippians 2:24 - GeneralPhilippians 4:22 - the;  1 Timothy 3:14 - hoping;  2 Timothy 4:21 - and all;  Philemon 1:22 - for I trust

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on 3 John 1:14". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/3-john-1.html.

E.M. Zerr's Commentary on Selected Books of the New Testament

The usual friendly salation from friends, just another affectionate title from the mind of the loving John. Greet the friends by name. This denotes a personal recognition of the faithful messengers who are coming to see the congregation

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Zerr, E.M. "Commentary on 3 John 1:14". E.M. Zerr's Commentary on Selected Books of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/znt/3-john-1.html. 1952.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

14.By name—Says Bengel, “just as if their names were written.” But as John knew the Church only by occasional visitations, and is writing only a private letter, he sends greeting not to the Church generally, but only to the special friends whom Gaius well knew, and to whom he would show this epistle.

 

 

 

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on 3 John 1:14". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/3-john-1.html. 1874-1909.

The Expositor's Greek Testament

3John 1:15. , pax tibi, the Jewish greeting, (Judges 6:23; Judges 19:20), , those at Ephesus; , those with Gaius. St. John knew all “by name,” and would have named them had space permitted. He had the true shepherd’s heart (cf.John 10:3, the only other place where occurs in N.T.). Ignat., ad Smyrn., xiii. 2: , , , , .

 

 

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Nicol, W. Robertson, M.A., L.L.D. "Commentary on 3 John 1:14". The Expositor's Greek Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/3-john-1.html. 1897-1910.

The Bible Study New Testament

14. I hope. John expects to visit Gaius soon. John may have made regular tours to the churches of the area.

15. Peace be with you. [Chapter and verse divisions date from the sixteenth century. Most Greek texts divide a 15th verse, as the TEV has done.] This is the Hebrew style of greeting (1 Peter 5:14). Friends. This is a personal letter. This is why John says friends rather than brothers.

 

 

 

 

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Bibliographical Information
Ice, Rhoderick D. "Commentary on 3 John 1:14". "The Bible Study New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ice/3-john-1.html. College Press, Joplin, MO. 1974.