Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

3 John 1:3

For I was very glad when brethren came and testified to your truth, that is, how you are walking in truth.
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Hospitality;   Zeal, Religious;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Missionary Work by Ministers;  
Dictionaries:
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Gaius;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Truth;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Diotrephes;   Gaius;   John the Apostle;   John, the Epistles of;   Timothy, the First Epistle to;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Love;   Truth;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Brotherly Love;   Diotrephes;   Excommunication;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Joy;   Walk (2);   Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - John the Baptist;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

When the brethren came - Probably the same of whom he speaks in the fifth ( 3 John 1:5;) and following verses, and who appear to have been itinerant evangelists.

The truth that is in thee - The soundness of thy faith and the depth of thy religion.

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Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on 3 John 1:3". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/3-john-1.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

For I rejoiced greatly when the brethren came - Who these were is not certainly known. They may have been members of the same church with Gaius, who, for some reason, had visited the writer of this Epistle; or they may have been the “brethren” who had gone from him with a letter of commendation to the church, 3 John 1:9, and had been rejected by the church through the influence of Diotrephes, and who, after having been hospitably entertained by Gaius, had again returned to the writer of this Epistle. In that case, they would of course bear honorable testimony to the kindness which they had received from Gaius, and to his Christian character.

And testified of the truth that is in thee - That you adhere steadfastly to the truth, notwithstanding the fact that errors abound, and that there are many false teachers in the world.

Even as thou walkest in the truth - Livest in accordance with the truth. The writer had made the same remark of the children of Cyria, to whom the second Epistle was directed. See the notes at 2 John 1:4.

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on 3 John 1:3". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/3-john-1.html. 1870.

The Biblical Illustrator

3 John 1:3

I rejoiced greatly, when the brethren came and testified of the truth that is in thee.

Beautiful is the picture presented in this verse. Here we have brethren engaging in Christian intercourse, ascertaining each other’s moral condition, and taking a deep and living interest in all that pertains to the education of the soul in the faith of Christ. This is a fine test of moral manhood. When we find men disposed to give the fullest credit for the growth and sincerity of their brethren in the faith, we may accept such witness as a proof that they themselves are firmly rooted in great principles, and are more and more resembling Him whose name they bear, and whose perfections it is the business of their lives to illustrate. (J. Parker, D. D.)

Gaius

We are now to study the character of Gaius, the sincere and generous host of Demetrius, the quiet but sturdy opponent of the intolerance and tyranny of Diotrephes, and the study should be very welcome to us since, if he has not climbed so high as the fervent and zealous Evangelist, still less has he fallen so low as the prating lover of pre-eminence who would not defer even to the apostle himself. With his first touch St. John strikes the ground-note, or the keynote, of the whole music which went to make up the character of the man. Gaius was one who “walked in truth,” and so walked in it that men “bore witness to his truth.” The Greek word here rendered “truth” might, if the change were worth making, be rendered “reality.” But if I say that Gaius was a true man, a genuine man, a real man, whose life was all of one piece, whose daily conduct was the practical outcome and inference from the truths he believed, I may perhaps help you to some conception of the apostle’s meaning. Still he implies much more than he says, and we must try to recover his implications also. We may, and must, infer from his stress on the word “truth” that Gaius cared more for deeds than for words; that there was not that unhappy divorce between his professions and his actions, his creed and his conduct, which we may see in Diotrophes and recognise only too clearly in ourselves. He did not look one way and walk another. He did not say one thing and mean another. He did not approve the better, and follow the worse, course. There was no hypocrisy, no insincerity, in him. He, the whole man, was “in the truth.” Come what may, no danger, no allurement, will draw or drive him from his steadfast and habitual round, or make him unfaithful to the faith and service of Christ. And we may also infer that Gaius was not one who would bring the spirit and methods of the world into the Church. Diotrephes might be as selfish, as opinionated, as ambitious, as subtle and scheming, as he was before he had entered the Christian fellowship. But that was not possible to a true man, a genuine Christian, such as Gaius, who really believed the truth as it is in Jesus. Nor, again, could a true man, in the apostle’s sense, yield to that still more subtle and fatal temptation by which those are overcome in whom religion degenerates, as it seems to have done in Diotrephes, into mere ecclesiasticism or sectarianism. A too keen and exclusive interest in the outside of the cup and the platter is as dangerous in the Church as it is anywhere else. And the charity of Gaius was as conspicuous as his unworldliness. Not only had he received and entertained strangers, who were also brethren, setting forward Demetrius and other travelling evangelists on their journey; he continued to receive and serve them even when Diotrephes forbade him, and had persuaded the Church to excommunicate those who ventured to receive them. He could do no other, for he walked in truth. Nor was he to be talked out of his loyalty to truth, or threatened out of it. Truth in every form was welcome to him, let who would teach it, let who would prate against it. It was his duty to receive brethren even if they were strangers. A certain genuineness and wholeness, then, a certain staunchness and loyalty, combined with great breadth and tolerance, seems to have been characteristic of the hospitable and kindly Gaius. He was in the truth. He walked in truth. There was a clear accord, a fruitful harmony, between his principles and his practice which gave unity and force to his life. He could be true to truth, come whence it would. He could be true to men, even when they were reviled and thrust out of the Church. Now this large, steadfast, yet gentle loyalty to truth is as essential to a genuine, a real and strong, Christian character now as it was then: a loyalty which can not only stand against the narrow intolerance of a Diotrephes, and sympathise with the disinterested zeal of a Demetrius, but can also bring the large generous truths in which we believe to bear upon our daily life and practice, and constrain us to receive and set forward all who are serving the truth “that we may be fellow-workers with the truth” they teach. Before we can put ourselves even on the modest level of Gaius, we must ask ourselves, “What risks have we run, what sacrifices have we made, what pleasant fellowships have we put in jeopardy, that we might stand up for unpopular truths, or back up the men who were enforcing and defending them? There are men, no doubt, who have a terrible struggle to wage in the sacred precincts of their own soul before they can make religion the ruling inference and power of their lives; and of these, perhaps, we must not expect much public service until the issue of the inward conflict has been decided; though I believe that, even in this inward personal war, they would be greatly aided were they to make it more impersonal, and to care and contend for the salvation of other men instead of simply fighting for their own hand. And there are other men who are so engrossed and exhausted by the labours and cares, the occupations and irritations, of their daily business that they have as much as they can do in bringing the spirit of religion to bear on their daily task, and have neither leisure nor energy left for works of public usefulness. Remember, we are not told that Gaius talked Diotrephes down, or that he made a masterly defence of St. John, or even that he took a prominent part whether in managing the affairs or conducting the services of the Church. All we are told of him is that he showed much sympathy with the strangers whom John had commended to the Church, that his sympathy took very practical forms, and that he exercised it at the risk, and perhaps at the cost, of losing the sympathy of brethren who were not strangers, and with whom he habitually worshipped. (S. Cox, D. D.)

The testimony of others

I. Faith in possession.

1. The unconditional acceptance of the truth.

2. The harmony of truth with our moral nature.

II. Faith in action.

1. Faith in action is a healthful and energising exercise of our whole life.

2. Faith in action is a power wielded over others.

III. Faith on record. The faithful witnesses who gave their evidence in the presence of St. John were samples of others who gave their evidence before the tribunal of the world.

1. It is a record worth making. To write down the deeds, the trials, and the victories of faith is not a waste of either time or materials.

2. It is worth rehearsing.

3. It is worth preserving. Its influence is marvellous. The lamp of another strengthens the light of our own, to make clearer the Christian path.

IV. The reflex influence of faith. Gaius was the apostle’s son in the faith. How the soul of the aged minister was lighted up as the brethren related to him the glad tidings concerning the soul he had been instrumental in saving. (T. Davies, M. A.)

Fame

is like a ship that receives all passengers, like a waggon that entertains all, good and bad. Bad things go abroad, and good things go abroad, but here is the difference.

1. Bad things go speedily, good slowly; the one flies like eagles, the other creeps like snails.

2. The one are enlarged, the other diminished.

3. The one all hear of, but a few of the others.

4. Bad things go without ceasing; men are like flies that are ever insisting upon sores; the report of good things is like a hue and cry that quickly falls down in the country.

5. The one we tell of with delight; we take little pleasure in talking of the other, yet we ought to testify of the one rather than of the other. Let us witness of the virtues wherewith God hath adorned any. It shall redound to his glory, and it shall be a spur to prick on others to the like. (W. Jones, D. D.)

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Exell, Joseph S. "Commentary on "3 John 1:3". The Biblical Illustrator. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tbi/3-john-1.html. 1905-1909. New York.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

For I rejoiced greatly, when brethren came and bare witness unto thy truth, even as thou walkest in truth.

When brethren came ... "The present tense indicates that not on one occasion, but on several, report[11] came." Wilder also agreed that, "The Greek participles here indicate that numerous such reports had come in."[12]

Their witness unto thy truth ... This refers to the enthusiastic reports of traveling missionaries in their appearances in various congregations where they were privileged to speak (3 John 1:1:6). "Witnessing" of this kind was done by the apostles themselves when they reported to "sponsoring" congregations that sent them out.

That thou walkest in truth ... Truth in the apostolic age was almost a technical term meaning "the faith," "the doctrine of Christ," or "the true religion." The modern conception of "all of us disciples are merely trying to find out what truth is" was never heard of by the primitive church. They knew the truth; they had obeyed the truth; they were walking in the truth; they loved the truth. With regard to the great basics of Christianity, one must indeed know them before he can even become a Christian.

[11] Charles C. Ryrie, Wycliffe Bible Commentary, New Testament (Chicago: Moody Press, 1971), p. 1036.

[12] Amos N. Wilder, The Interpreter's Bible, Vol. XII (New York: Abingdon Press, 1956), p. 309.

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Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
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Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on 3 John 1:3". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/3-john-1.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

For I rejoiced greatly when the brethren came,.... From the place where Gaius lived, to that where John now resided; these brethren seem to be preachers of the word, who travelled from place to place to spread the Gospel:

and testified of the truth that is in thee; either of Christ, who was formed in him; or of the Gospel, which had a place in his heart; or of the truth of grace that was in him, as well as of that faithfulness, integrity, and sincerity he appeared to be possessed of, being an Israelite indeed, and without guile:

even as thou walkest in the truth: in Christ, and in the Gospel, and as became it, and with all uprightness; see 2 John 1:4; and this occasioned great joy in the apostle; as it is matter of joy to every one that truly loves Christ, and his Gospel; or has the true grace of charity in him, which envies not the gifts and graces of others, but rejoiceth in the truth, wherever it is found; and especially to the faithful ministers of the word, when they hear of the truth of grace in any souls, and that such continue walking in the truth of the Gospel, and particularly those who have been wrought upon under their ministry, as follows.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on 3 John 1:3". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/3-john-1.html. 1999.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

testified of the truth that is in theeGreek, “of” (or ‹to‘) thy truth”: thy share of that truth in which thou walkest [Alford].

even as thou — in contrast to Diotrephes (3 John 1:9).

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This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on 3 John 1:3". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/3-john-1.html. 1871-8.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

I rejoiced greatly (εχαρην λιανecharēn lian). As in 2 John 1:4; Philippians 4:10, not epistolary aorist, but reference to his emotions at the good tidings about Gaius.

When brethren came (ερχομενων αδελπωνerchomenōn adelphōn). Genitive absolute with present middle participle of ερχομαιerchomai and so with μαρτυρουντωνmarturountōn (bare witness, present active participle of μαρτυρεωmartureō). Present participle here denotes repetition, from time to time.

To the truth (τηι αλητειαιtēi alētheiāi). Dative case. “As always in the Johannine writings, ‹truth‘ covers every sphere of life, moral, intellectual, spiritual” (Brooke).

Even as thou walkest in truth (κατως συ εν αλητειαι περιπατειςkathōs su en alētheiāi peripateis). “Thou” in contrast to Diotrephes (3 John 1:9) and others like him. On περιπατεωperipateō see 1 John 1:6 and on εν αλητειαιen alētheiāi see 2 John 1:4.

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The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)
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Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on 3 John 1:3". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/3-john-1.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Vincent's Word Studies

Rejoiced greatly

See on 2 John 1:4.

Brethren came ( ἐρχομένων ἀδελφῶν )

Lit., coming. The present participle denotes coming from time to time, and not coming on a single occasion, which would require the aorist. On brethren, see on 1 John 2:9.

Thou walkest in truth

See on 1 John 1:8. for the phrase walk in, see on 2 John 1:6. Thou is emphatic, suggesting a contrast with less faithful ones, as Diotrephes, 3 John 1:9.

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Vincent, Marvin R. DD. "Commentary on 3 John 1:3". "Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/vnt/3-john-1.html. Charles Schribner's Sons. New York, USA. 1887.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

For I rejoiced greatly, when the brethren came and testified of the truth that is in thee, even as thou walkest in the truth.

For — I know thou usest all thy talents to his glory.

The truth that is in thee — The true faith and love.

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Wesley, John. "Commentary on 3 John 1:3". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/3-john-1.html. 1765.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

3 For I rejoiced greatly, when the brethren came and testified of the truth that is in thee, even as thou walkest in the truth.

Ver. 3. Testified of the truth] This was their ingenuity, thus, at least, to requite their host by giving testimony of his liberality, and this his liberality proved the truth of his faith, and his good estate to Godward, as did Dorcas’s garments made for the poor. Lipsius conqueritur desiisse homines non modo laudanda facere, sed laudare. (l. ii. Epis. 70.)

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on 3 John 1:3". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/3-john-1.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

3 John 1:3. Testified of the truth Testified concerning the truth ( σου τη αληθεια ), as thou walkest in the truth, and adornest the gospel by an exemplary behaviour.

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Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on 3 John 1:3". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/3-john-1.html. 1801-1803.

Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament

Observe here, 1. The commendable testimony which the brethren that came from Gaius have to St. John concerning his holy and unblamable conversation, according to the direction of the gospel. The brethren testified of thee, that thou walkest in the truth: good reports of our brethren, without detracting any thing from their worth, is a manifest duty.

Observe, 2. With what joy and rejoicing St. John received the notices of Gaius' adherence to the truth, and of his answerable walking thereunto. I rejoiced when the brethren came and testified of thee; he did not envy the grace of God so largely conferred on Gaius, but rejoiced in it, and no doubt blessed God exceedingly for it: soul-mercies are the greatest mercies, and matters of the greatest joy to gracious souls.

Observe, 3. That additional joy which St. John expresses to hear that his children, that is, those persons whom he had converted to Christianity, and begotten to Christ through the gospel, did walk in the truth, that is, in the sincere practice as well as in the outward profession of religion: I have no greater joy than to hear that my children walk in the truth; the faithful ministers of Christ rejoice more in the welfare of their people's souls, than in all their worldly wealth or honour.

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Burkitt, William. "Commentary on 3 John 1:3". Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wbc/3-john-1.html. 1700-1703.

Heinrich Meyer's Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament

3 John 1:3. Confirmation of the foregoing statement.

ἐχάρην γὰρ λίαν] see on 2 John 1:4. When and why the apostle felt such a joy is stated in the two following participial sentences, of which, however, as far as the sense is concerned, the first is subordinate to the second; à Mons: lorsque les frères qui sont venus ont rendu témoignage.

μαρτυρεῖν, with the dative of the thing: “to testify of anything;” comp. 3 John 1:6; 3 John 1:12; John 3:26; John 5:33; John 18:37.

By σου τῇ ἀληθείᾳ it is not the truth in the objective sense (Calovius: veritas evangelii) in so far as Caius had received it, but the truth in the subjective sense, that is to be understood (so also Lücke, Düsterdieck, Braune, etc.): the inner Christian life, which is born of the truth, is itself truth; some commentators incorrectly limit the idea to a single element of it; e.g. Lorinus to liberalitas.

The addition: καθὼς σὺ ἐν ἀληθείᾳ περιπατεῖς (comp. 2 John 1:4), serves as an explanation of the preceding: “namely how thou,” etc. In the fact that the brethren testified that Caius was walking in the truth, they bore a testimony to the truth that was in him. The sentence is not “a direct sentence” (Baumgarten-Crusius: “as thou indeed art living in accordance with the truth”) by which “John adds his testimony to that of the brethren (Besser) in order to confirm it” (Ebrard), but “an indirect sentence” (Brückner) dependent on μαρτυρούντων, on which a special emphasis is laid, as also the ἀκούω in 3 John 1:4 shows (so also Düsterdieck, Braune). σύ is emphatically used in contrast to those who do not walk ἐν ἀληθείᾳ.

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Meyer, Heinrich. "Commentary on 3 John 1:3". Heinrich Meyer's Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hmc/3-john-1.html. 1832.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

3 John 1:3. ἐχάρην, I rejoiced) This is enlarged upon in 3 John 1:4.— γ ρ, for) A healthy state of the soul is known by the works; and the prayers of the righteous further this state.— καθ ς, even as) is explanatory.— σ) thou; opposed to Diotrephes, 3 John 1:9.

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Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on 3 John 1:3". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/3-john-1.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Ver. 3,4. The truth is familiarly used to signify the pure doctrine of Christianity, which in its principal design aims at correspondent practice. That his children, i.e. such as had been converted to Christ by his ministry, {as 1 Corinthians 4:15} of whom it appears Gaius was one, did

walk in the truth; ( an apt expression of such correspondent practice); was greatest matter of joy to this holy apostle, especially when the godly lives of such, to whose conversion he had been instrumental, were so observable, as to gain them a testimony from all others that knew them, as it was in the present instance.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on 3 John 1:3". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/3-john-1.html. 1685.

Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture

когда пришли братия и засвидетельствовали Это выражение указывает, что христиане постоянно хвалили Гаия за послушание основам истины. Духовная репутация его была хорошо известна.

ты ходишь в истине Дела Гаия соответствовали его словам. Как проповедник, он также пользовался примерной репутацией (2Ин. 4). Похвала Иоанна Гаию – одна из самых щедрых в Новом Завете, поскольку Иоанн хвалит его не только за то, что он знает истину, но и за то, что верно применяет ее. Поведение Гаия представляло разительный контраст отрицательной репутации Диотрефа (ст. 10).

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MacLaren, Alexander. "Commentary on 3 John 1:3". Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mac/3-john-1.html.

Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable

John had heard from others that Gaius was a man of the truth. That Isaiah, his lifestyle was consistent with the truth.

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Constable, Thomas. DD. "Commentary on 3 John 1:3". "Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dcc/3-john-1.html. 2012.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

rejoiced greatly. See 2 John 1:4.

the. Omit.

testified. Greek. martureo. See p. 1511.

the truth, &c. Literally thy truth.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on 3 John 1:3". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/3-john-1.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

For I rejoiced greatly, when the brethren came and testified of the truth that is in thee, even as thou walkest in the truth. Testified of the truth that is in thee - `to thy truth:' thy share of that truth in which thou walkest (Alford). Even as thou - in contrast to Diotrephes (3 John 1:9).

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Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on 3 John 1:3". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/3-john-1.html. 1871-8.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

For I rejoiced greatly, when the brethren came and testified of the truth that is in thee, even as thou walkest in the truth.
I
4; 2 John 1:4; Philippians 1:4; 1 Thessalonians 2:19,20
when
Romans 1:8,9; 2 Corinthians 7:6,7; Ephesians 1:15,16; Colossians 1:7,8; 1 Thessalonians 3:6-9
the truth
2 John 1:2,4; Psalms 119:11
Reciprocal: Psalm 26:3 - and;  Psalm 86:11 - I will;  Proverbs 20:7 - just;  Proverbs 23:15 - if;  Romans 1:12 - that I may;  Romans 6:17 - But;  1 Corinthians 13:6 - rejoiceth;  Philippians 1:27 - I may;  Philippians 2:19 - that I;  Colossians 1:4 - we;  Philemon 1:7 - great joy;  1 John 1:8 - the truth;  1 John 2:14 - the word;  1 John 2:24 - abide;  3 John 1:2 - even

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on 3 John 1:3". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/3-john-1.html.

E.M. Zerr's Commentary on Selected Books of the New Testament

Some brethren had brought a report of the conduct of Gaius which was favorable. That is the basis of his remark about his soul prospering.

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Zerr, E.M. "Commentary on 3 John 1:3". E.M. Zerr's Commentary on Selected Books of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/znt/3-john-1.html. 1952.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

3.For—Giving reason for assuming that his soul was all right; namely, his accepting and aiding John’s missionaries of truth, instead of the errorists.

The brethren came—The missionaries sent by John, who returned from their first mission into Asia Minor, back to Ephesus, and made report. Their report in regard to their entertainment by Gaius was such that our apostle rejoiced greatly. And he was induced thereby, on their starting for their second journey, to send by them this letter to Gaius.

 

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Bibliographical Information
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on 3 John 1:3". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/3-john-1.html. 1874-1909.

The Expositor's Greek Testament

3 John 1:3. , see note on 2 John 1:4. , repeatedly, not on one particular occasion ( ). The itinerant brethren (die reisenden Brüder) were always at work, going out from Ephesus on their missions and returning with their reports. Cf.3 John 1:5-6. See Introd. p. 155.

 

 

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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Nicol, W. Robertson, M.A., L.L.D. "Commentary on 3 John 1:3". The Expositor's Greek Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/3-john-1.html. 1897-1910.

The Bible Study New Testament

3. I was so happy. “I know your spirit is in good health, because of the report some brothers brought back to me!” The Greek implies it was a continuous good report that was coming to John. These are brothers whom Gaius has helped.

 

 

 

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Bibliographical Information
Ice, Rhoderick D. "Commentary on 3 John 1:3". "The Bible Study New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ice/3-john-1.html. College Press, Joplin, MO. 1974.