Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Daniel 9:13

As it is written in the law of Moses, all this calamity has come on us; yet we have not sought the favor of the Lord our God by turning from our iniquity and giving attention to Your truth.
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Afflictions and Adversities;   Impenitence;   Intercession;   Nation;   Prayer;   Prayerlessness;   Prophets;   Scofield Reference Index - Law of Moses;   Thompson Chain Reference - Afflictions;   Earnestness-Indifference;   Impenitence;   Penitence-Impenitence;   Prayer;   Prayerlessness;   The Topic Concordance - Curses;   Disobedience;   Iniquity;   Israel/jews;   Sin;   Transgression;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Prayer, Intercessory;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Daniel;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Humility;   Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Reconciliation;   Easton Bible Dictionary - Deuteronomy;   Pentateuch;   Sanctification;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Captivity;   Prayer;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Daniel, Book of;   Ezekiel;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Daniel, Book of;   Prayer;   Thessalonians, Second Epistle to the;   Truth;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Synagogue;   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Confession;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Deuteronomy;   Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Bible;  
Encyclopedias:
Condensed Biblical Cyclopedia - Babylonish Captivity, the;   International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Baruch, Book of;   Moses;   The Jewish Encyclopedia - Confession of Sin;   Prayer;  
Devotionals:
Every Day Light - Devotion for February 17;  

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

As it is written in the law of Moses - The word law was given to all the writings of Moses. See the notes at Luke 24:44.

Yet made we not our prayer before the Lord our God - Margin, “entreated we not the face of.” The Hebrew word used here (חלה châlâh ) means, properly, “to be polished;” then to be worn down in strength, to be weak; then to be sick, or diseased; then in Piel (the form used here), to rub or stroke the face of anyone, to soothe or caress, and hence, to beseech, or supplicate. See Gesenius, “Lexicon” Here it means, that, as a people, they had failed, when they had sinned, to call upon God for pardon; to confess their sins; to implore his mercy; to deprecate his wrath. It would have been easy to turn aside his threatened judgments if they had been penitent, and had sought his mercy, but they had not done it. What is here said of them can and will be said of all sinners when the Divine judgment comes upon them.

That we might turn from, our iniquities - That we might seek grace to turn from our transgressions. “And understand thy truth.” The truth which God had revealed; equivalent to saying that they might be righteous.

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Daniel 9:13". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/daniel-9.html. 1870.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

As it is written in the law of Moses, all this evil is come upon us,.... As it is there threatened it should, and as it is there foretold it would come upon them, so it has; even the selfsame things, in the same manner, and with the same circumstances, as there foretold; which is a proof of the omniscience, omnipotence, and faithfulness of God, and an evidence of the truth of divine revelation; see Leviticus 26:1,

yet made we not our prayer before the Lord our God; during the seventy years captivity, they might have prayed, and doubtless did, in a lifeless, formal manner; but not sincerely and heartily, in faith and with fervency, under a sense of sin, with confession of it, and true repentance for it, and so as to forsake it, as follows:

that we might turn from our iniquities; for since they did not pray against sin, and entreat the Lord to enable them to turn from it, and forsake it, but continued in a course of disobedience, their prayer was not reckoned prayer:

and understand thy truth; either the truth and faithfulness of God, in fulfilling both his promises and his threatenings; or his law, which is truth, as Jacchiades interprets it; for, had they prayed aright, they would have had an understanding given them of divine truths, both with respect to doctrine and practice; of which they were ignorant, as prayerless persons usually are.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Daniel 9:13". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/daniel-9.html. 1999.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

yet made we not our prayer before — literally, “soothed not the face of.” Not even our chastisement has taught us penitence (Isaiah 9:13; Jeremiah 5:3; Hosea 7:10). Diseased, we spurn the healing medicine.

that we might turn, etc. — Prayer can only be accepted when joined with the desire to turn from sin to God (Psalm 66:18; Proverbs 28:9).

understand thy truth — “attentively regard Thy faithfulness” in fulfilling Thy promises, and also Thy threats [Calvin]. Thy law (Daniel 8:12), [Maurer].

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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Daniel 9:13". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/daniel-9.html. 1871-8.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Daniel 9:13 As [it is] written in the law of Moses, all this evil is come upon us: yet made we not our prayer before the LORD our God, that we might turn from our iniquities, and understand thy truth.

Ver. 13. All this evil is come upon us.] But unless God set in and sanctify, his hammers (afflictions) do but beat upon cold iron. [Jeremiah 2:30]

Yet made we not our prayer.] Little or no right prayer was made by the captives all those seventy years (and yet they had their set yearly fasts, Zechariah 7:1-5), because they failed therein both quoad fontem et quoad finem. {See Trapp on "Zechariah 7:5"}

That we might turn from our iniquities.] This they had no mind to, therefore they lost those prayers they made; they fasted to themselves and not to God (Zechariah 7:5. See on John 3:10).

And understand thy truth.] Those that turn from their iniquities shall know more of God’s truth. The pure in heart shall see God. [Matthew 5:8]

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Bibliographical Information
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Daniel 9:13". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/daniel-9.html. 1865-1868.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

As it is written in the law of Moses: see Leviticus 26:14-39. The sum of all is, As the Lord threatened and forewarned us long ago, so it is come to pass this day upon us, because we took no warning, we understood not, but sinned and returned not. The Lord is true and just in all that is come upon us; chiefly because we have not made our prayer unto God to prevent our misery before it came upon us, nor to remove it when it lay heavy on us. See it in Ezekiel, who prophesied in the captivity, and how they received him; and though they kept a formal fast, yet what did that signify? Zechariah 7:5-7.

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Bibliographical Information
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Daniel 9:13". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/daniel-9.html. 1685.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Truth, in executing thy promises and menaces.

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Bibliographical Information
Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Daniel 9:13". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/daniel-9.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

As = According as.

it is written, &c. Reference to Pentateuch (Leviticus 26:14, &c. Deuteronomy 28:15, &c, as above). App-92.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Daniel 9:13". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/daniel-9.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

As it is written in the law of Moses, all this evil is come upon us: yet made we not our prayer before the LORD our God, that we might turn from our iniquities, and understand thy truth.

Yet made we not our prayer before the Lord our God - literally, we soothed not the face of the Lord. Not even our chastizement has taught us penitence (Isaiah 9:13; Jeremiah 5:3; Hosea 7:10). Diseased, we spun the healing medicine.

That we might turn from our iniquities. - Prayer can only be accepted when joined with the desire to turn from sin to God (Psalms 66:18; Proverbs 28:9).

And understand thy truth - attentively regard thy faithfulness in fulfilling thy promises and also thy threats (Calvin). Or else "thy truth" means thy law (Daniel 8:12). (Maurer.)

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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Daniel 9:13". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/daniel-9.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(13) Made we not our prayer.—The reference is, as in Daniel 9:6, to the conduct of the nation from the first. There had been plenty of external show of praying, as appears from Isaiah 1 and elsewhere, but these prayers were of no effect on account of their formalism. The conditions of acceptable prayer are implied in the closing words of the verse “turning from iniquity, and wisdom in the truth,” i.e., in the revelation of God. On the phrase “make prayer,” see Exodus 32:11.

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Bibliographical Information
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Daniel 9:13". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/daniel-9.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

As it is written in the law of Moses, all this evil is come upon us: yet made we not our prayer before the LORD our God, that we might turn from our iniquities, and understand thy truth.
As it is
Thus every succeeding part of the Sacred writings attests and prove the Divine authority of the preceding. The history relates the fulfilment of former predictions; and then new prophecies are add, which future events accomplish, and thus demonstrate their inspiration to the latest ages.
11; Leviticus 26:14-46; Deuteronomy 28:15-68; Isaiah 42:9; Lamentations 2:15-17; John 10:35
made we not our prayer before
Heb. intreated we not the face of.
Job 36:13; Isaiah 9:13; Jeremiah 2:30; 5:3; Hosea 7:7,10,14
that we
Deuteronomy 29:4; Psalms 85:4; 119:18,27,73; Isaiah 64:7; Jeremiah 31:18; 44:27; Lamentations 5:21; Luke 24:45; John 6:45; 8:32; Ephesians 1:17,18; 4:21; James 1:5
Reciprocal: Deuteronomy 31:9 - Moses;  1 Kings 8:48 - And so return;  Nehemiah 1:7 - which thou;  Psalm 44:17 - All this;  Isaiah 31:1 - neither;  Isaiah 43:22 - thou hast not;  Isaiah 59:20 - unto;  Jeremiah 36:7 - It may;  Ezekiel 18:30 - Repent;  Ezekiel 24:12 - her great;  Ezekiel 33:11 - turn ye;  Acts 3:19 - be

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Bibliographical Information
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Daniel 9:13". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/daniel-9.html.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

He repeats what he had already said, without any superfluity, shewing how God’s judgments are proved by their effects, as the law of Moses contains within it all the penalties which the Israelites endured. As, therefore, so manifest an agreement existed between the law of God and the people’s experience, they ought not to become restive and to have sought every kind of subterfuge without profit. By this alone God sufficiently proved himself a just avenger of their crimes, because he had predicted many ages before what he had afterwards fully carried out. This is the object of the repetition, when Daniel says the people felt the justice of the penalties denounced against them in the law of Moses, for in the meantime he adds, we have not deprecated the face of God. Here he severely blames the people’s hardness, because even when beaten with stripes they never grew wise. It is said — fools require calamities to teach them wisdom. This, therefore, was the height of madness in the people to remain thus stubborn under the rod of the Almighty, even when he inflicted the severest blows. As the people were so obstinate in their wickedness, who does not perceive how sincerely this conduct was to be deplored? We have not deprecated, therefore, the face of our God This passage teaches us how the Lord exercises his judgments by not utterly destroying men, but holding his final sentence in suspense, as by these means he wishes to impel men to repentance. First of all, he gently and mercifully invites both bad and good by his word, and adds also promises, with the view of enticing them; and then, when he observes them either slow or refractory, he uses threatenings with the view of arousing them from their slumber; and should threats produce no effect, he goes forth in arms and chastises the sluggishness of mankind. Should these stripes produce no improvement, the desperate character of the people becomes apparent. In this way, God complains in Isaiah of their want of soundness; the whole body of the people is subject to ulcers from the head to the sole of the foot, (Isaiah 1:6;) and yet he would lose all his labor, through their being utterly unmanageable. Daniel now asserts the existence of the same failing in the people, while he states the Israelites to be so untouched by a sense of their calamities, as never to supplicate for pardon. I cannot complete the remainder today.

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Calvin, John. "Commentary on Daniel 9:13". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/daniel-9.html. 1840-57.