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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Deuteronomy 28:68

"The LORD will bring you back to Egypt in ships, by the way about which I spoke to you, `You will never see it again!' And there you will offer yourselves for sale to your enemies as male and female slaves, but there will be no buyer."

Adam Clarke Commentary

And the Lord shall bring thee into Egypt again - That is, into another state of slavery and bondage similar to that of Egypt, out of which they had been lately brought. And there ye shall be sold, that is, be exposed to sale, or expose yourself to sale as the word התמכרתם hithmaccartem may be rendered; they were vagrants, and wished to become slaves that they might be provided with the necessaries of life. And no man shall buy you; even the Romans thought it a reproach to have a Jew for a slave, they had become so despicable to all mankind. When Jerusalem was taken by Titus, many of the captives, which were above seventeen years of age, were sent into the works in Egypt. See Josephus, Antiq., b. xii, 100:1, 2, War b. vi., c. 9, s. 2; and above all, see Bp. Newton's Dissertations on the Prophecies.

The first verse of the next chapter, in some of the most correct Hebrew Bibles, makes the 69th of this; and very properly, as the second verse of the following chapter begins a new subject.

This is an astonishing chapter: in it are prophecies delivered more than 3,000 years ago, and now fulfilling.

O God, how immense is thy wisdom, and how profound thy counsels! To thee alone are known all thy works from the beginning to the end. What an irrefragable proof does this chapter, compared with the past and present state of the Jewish people, afford of the truth and Divine origin of the Pentateuch!


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Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Deuteronomy 28:68". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/deuteronomy-28.html. 1832.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

And the Lord shall bring thee into Egypt again with ships,.... Either into a state of hard bondage and slavery, like that their fathers were in, in Egypt; or rather, strictly and literally, should be brought into Egypt again, since it is said to be "with" or "in ships". This does not respect the going of those Jews into Egypt who were left in the land of Judea, after the destruction of Jerusalem by Nebuchadnezzar; for that was against the express command of God, Jeremiah 42:13. There were several movings of them into Egypt after that time; an Heathen historianF23Hecataeus apud Joseph. contr. Apion, l. 1. sect. 22. tells us, that not a few thousands of Jews went into Egypt and Phoenicia, because of the sedition in Syria after the death of Alexander; and where, it seems, in process of time, they became slaves: for we are told by JosephusF24Antiqu. l. 12. c. 2. sect. 1. , that 120,000 slaves were set free by Ptolemy Philadelphus; but what is chiefly respected here is their case in the times of the Romans, and by their means. Now when Jerusalem was taken by Titus, those above seventeen years of age were sent by him to the works, or mines, in Egypt, as the same historian relatesF25De Bello Jud. l. 6. c. 9. sect. 2. ; and after their last overthrow by Adrian many thousands were sold, and what could not be sold were transported into Egypt, and perished by "shipwreck", or famine, or were slaughtered by the peopleF26Hieron. in Zech. ii. fol. 120. I. whereby this prophecy was literally and exactly fulfilled, and which is owned by the Jews themselves. Manasseh Ben IsraelF1De Termino Vitae, l. 3. sect. 3. p. 131, 132. observes, that though Vespasian banished the Jews into various countries, Egypt is only mentioned by way of reproach, as if it had been said, ye shall go captives into the land from which ye went out triumphant:

by the way whereof I spake unto thee, thou shall see it no more again; the Targum of Jonathan is,"the Word of the Lord shall bring thee into Egypt again in ships;'even the same divine Word, the Son of God, that brought them out of it, and went before them in a pillar of cloud and fire, now provoked by their rejection of him, would lead them back again thither; the paraphrast adds,"through the midst of the Red sea, in the path in which ye passed;'as if they were carried over into Egypt in ships, just in that part of the sea in which they had passed before; but that was an unknown and unseen path, after the waters were closed up, and never to be seen more, and which is here meant; for not Egypt, but the way in which they passed, was to be seen no more:

and there ye shall be sold unto your enemies for bondmen and for bondwomen, and no man shall buy you; that is, there in Egypt they would be offered to sale, and so many would be sold until the market was glutted with them, and there would be no buyers. The Targum of Jonathan is,"ye shall be sold there at first to your enemies, at a dear price, as artificers, and afterwards at a mean price as servants and handmaids, until ye become despised, and be brought to serve for nothing, and there be none to take you in.'Jarchi interprets it of they themselves being desirous, and seeking to be sold, to avoid cruelties and death; which agrees with the sense of the word, which may be rendered, "ye shall offer yourselves for sale"; but there will be no buyer, because their enemies will determine upon the slaughter and consumption of them; and to the same purpose Aben Ezra. There were such numbers of them to be sold both at Egypt and at Rome, that the sellers of them had but a poor market for them; and it seems not only because of their number, but the ill opinion had of them as servants. HegesippusF2De excidio Urb. Hieros. l. 5. c. 47. p. 645. says,"there were many to be sold, but there were few buyers; for the Romans despised the Jews for service, nor were there Jews left to redeem their own.'It is saidF3Ib. p. 680. , that thirty were sold for a penny; a just retaliation to them, who had sold their Messiah for thirty pieces of silver.


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Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Deuteronomy 28:68". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/deuteronomy-28.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

And the LORD shall bring thee into Egypt again with z ships, by the way whereof I spake unto thee, Thou shalt see it no more again: and there ye shall be sold unto your enemies for bondmen and bondwomen, and no man shall buy [you].

(z) Because they were unmindful of that miracle, when the sea made room for them to pass through.

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Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Deuteronomy 28:68". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/deuteronomy-28.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

The Lord shall bring thee into Egypt again with ships — The accomplishment of this prediction took place under Titus, when, according to Josephus, multitudes of Jews were transported in ships to the land of the Nile, and sold as slaves. “Here, then, are instances of prophecies delivered above three thousand years ago; and yet, as we see, being fulfilled in the world at this very time; and what stronger proofs can we desire of the divine legation of Moses? How these instances may affect others I know not; but for myself, I must acknowledge, they not only convince but amaze and astonish me beyond expression; they are truly, as Moses foretold (Deuteronomy 28:45, Deuteronomy 28:46) they would be, ‹a sign and a wonder for ever‘” [Bishop Newton].


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Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Deuteronomy 28:68". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/deuteronomy-28.html. 1871-8.

Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary

REFLECTIONS

OH, my soul! let the awful review of the calamities here held forth to disobedient Israel, endear, with increasing love and affection, the person of thy ever-adored Redeemer; and his great salvation to thee; and may the perusal of this Chapter under the HOLY GHOST's teaching, constrain thee into his love, and to cleave unto him with full purpose of heart, for he is thy life. Oh! precious, precious JESUS, what eternal praises are thy due! Oh! what unspeakable mercies do I behold in that one view of JESUS, a GOD in CHRIST, reconciling the world unto himself, not imputing their trespasses unto them. I see, I feel, I stand convinced, that to this one cause, every blessing in time, and to all eternity is owing. LORD! keep me, hold me, establish me in this most precious assurance, and may I never dare to taste a single joy until I see JESUS in it. If thou, dearest LORD, will give it me, it will be sanctified. But without thee, the best of creature comforts will prove a snare. My unawakened brother! if GOD in mercy should cause my humble Commentary to meet the eye of one of this character, will you not in the perusal of this Chapter, stand convinced that the judgments of GOD are sure judgments; and the least of them most awful indeed! And is not GOD the faithful GOD, as fully pledged to perform his written threats to the ungodly, as he is pledged to perform his promises to his people. Oh! that grace may open the eye, convince the heart, awaken the affection, and induce sinners to flee from the wrath to come: for depend upon it, there is, there must be a day coming, when indignation and wrath, tribulation and anguish, will fall upon every soul of man that doeth evil, of the Jew first, and also of the Gentile.


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Bibliography
Hawker, Robert, D.D. "Commentary on Deuteronomy 28:68". "Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pmc/deuteronomy-28.html. 1828.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

And the LORD shall bring thee into Egypt again with ships, by the way whereof I spake unto thee, Thou shalt see it no more again: and there ye shall be sold unto your enemies for bondmen and bondwomen, and no man shall buy you.

Into Egypt — Which was literally fulfilled under Titus, when multitudes of them were carried thither in ships, and sold for slaves. And this expression seems to mind them of that time when they went over the sea without ships, God miraculously drying up the sea before them, which now they would have occasion sadly to remember.

By the way — Or, to the way. And the way seems not to be meant here of the usual road-way from Canaan to Egypt, which was wholly by land, but to be put for the end of the way or journey, even the land of Egypt, for to this, and not to the road-way between Canaan and Egypt, agree the words here following, whereof I speak unto thee, thou shalt see it, (that is, Egypt) no more again.

No man shall buy you — Either because the number of your captives shall be so great, that the market shall be glutted with you; or because you shall be so loathsome and contemptible that men shall not be willing to have you for slaves. And this was the condition of the Jews after the destruction of Jerusalem, as Josephus the Jew hath left upon record. Let us all learn hence, to stand in awe and not to sin. I have heard of a wicked man (says Mr. Henry) who on reading these threatenings, was so enraged, that he tore the leaf out of his bible. But to what purpose is it, to deface a copy, while the original remains unchangeable? By which it is determined, that the wages of sin is death: yea, a death more dreadful than all that is here spoken!


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Bibliography
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Deuteronomy 28:68". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/deuteronomy-28.html. 1765.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

68.And the Lord shall bring thee into Egypt again with ships. We know that the people were so driven about in the desert amidst divers perils, that they only escaped from it in safety by extraordinary miracles. It was therefore a thing most highly to be desired by their posterity, that they should never be carried back into those mighty depths. He who had once rescued them from those deaths might indeed often be their deliverer; but in order to make His blessing at that time more memorable, He had provided that they should never return into that wilderness. To bring them back into it again, was, then, in a manner to blot out the grace of redemption. If any object that it was impossible that the people should be conveyed in ships through dry places, the reply is easy, that since mention is made of the captivity, there is no absurdity in their being carried in ships and landed on the shore which (256) belongs to the plain of Moab, so as to finish their journey by wandering through the desert on foot.

Finally, he shews how melancholy their condition would be, since they would desire to sell themselves to their enemies, and would find none to buy them on account of their vileness.


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Bibliography
Calvin, John. "Commentary on Deuteronomy 28:68". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/deuteronomy-28.html. 1840-57.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Deuteronomy 28:68 And the LORD shall bring thee into Egypt again with ships, by the way whereof I spake unto thee, Thou shalt see it no more again: and there ye shall be sold unto your enemies for bondmen and bondwomen, and no man shall buy [you].

Ver. 68. And the Lord shall bring thee into Egypt.] This is the last and greatest curse here threatened. Oh pray, pray, said that Dutch divine upon his deathbed, Pontifex enim Romanus, et Concilium Tridentinum mira moliuntur, for the Pope and his council are seeking to bring us all back into spiritual Egypt.

Ah ne diem illum posteri

Vivant meiquo pristinum

Vertantur in lutum aurea

Quae non bearunt saecula! ”

What long hath been the opinion and fear of some, not unconsiderable divines, that Antichrist, before his abolition, shall once again overflow the whole face of the west, and suppress the whole Protestant churches, I pray God to avert. {a}


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Trapp, John. "Commentary on Deuteronomy 28:68". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/deuteronomy-28.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Ver. 68. The Lord shall bring thee into Egypt again with ships;—and there ye shall be sold unto your enemies—and no man shall buy you They were to be carried into Egypt, and sold for slaves at a very low price. They had come out of Egypt triumphant; but now they should return thither as slaves. They had walked through the sea, as on dry land, at their coming out; but now they should be carried thither in ships. They might be carried thither in the ships of the Tyrian or Sidonian merchants, or by the Romans, who had a fleet in the Mediterranean; and this was a much safer way of conveying so many prisoners, than sending them by land. It appears from Josephus, that in the reigns of the two first Ptolemies, many of the Jews were slaves in Egypt: and when Jerusalem was taken by Titus, of the captives who were above seventeen years of age, he sent many bound to the works in Egypt: those under seventeen years were sold; but so little care was taken of them, that twelve thousand perished for want. See Antiq. l. xii. c. 1, 2. Bell. Jud. l. vi. c. 9. sect. 2. We learn from St. Jerome, in Zach. vol. iii. c. 11. p. 1774. that "after their last overthrow by Adrian, many thousands of them were sold; and that those who could not be sold were transported for AEgypt, and perished by shipwreck or famine, or were massacred by the inhabitants." See Bishop Newton on the Prophecies. Hegesippus, giving an account of what happened after the destruction of Jerusalem, says, "there were many captives offered for sale, but few buyers, because the Romans disdained to take the Jews for slaves; and there were not Jews remaining to redeem their countrymen." By the way whereof I spake unto thee, &c. may be rendered, perhaps more properly, to the way, or place, whereof I said, ye shall see it no more again; referring to what is said, ch. Deuteronomy 17:16. The phrase, Ye shall be sold unto your enemies, and no man shall buy you, evidently and plainly means, ye shall be offered for sale, &c.; and none but the most captious reader could understand it in any other sense. Dr. Waterland, from Blackwall, p. 100 reads, ye shall be set to sale. Houbigant renders it, ibi prostabitis inimicis vestris ad emptionem; and so the Syriac and Arabic. Bishop Newton well observes, in the conclusion of his view of this chapter, "Here are instances of prophecies delivered above three thousand years ago, and yet, as we see, fulfilling in the world at this very time. What stronger proofs can we desire of the divine legation of Moses? How these instances may affect others, I know not; but, for myself, I must acknowledge, they not only convince, but amaze and astonish me beyond expression. They are truly, as Moses foretold they would be, a sign and a wonder for ever."

It is impossible, in the brief compass of notes like our's, to do justice to this striking and important subject; and, perhaps, there is no method by which the reader may obtain a proper view of it, like that of a careful perusal of the History of the Jews, by Josephus and Basnage; comparing which with these and the subsequent prophecies in Scripture, he will have a full conviction of the immediate interposition of God, and of that strong demonstration of the truth of revelation which arises from the circumstances of this wonderful people.


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Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Deuteronomy 28:68". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/deuteronomy-28.html. 1801-1803.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Into Egypt again, whence he hath now so gloriously delivered thee, as repenting of all his kindness to thee, and resolved to undo what he hath done for thee. And the remembrance of what they endured in Egypt could not but make the thoughts of returning thither again very terrible to them.

With ships; which was literally fulfilled under Titus, when multitudes of them were carried thither in ships, and sold there for slaves, as Josephus relates. And this expression seems to mind them of that time when they went over the sea without ships, God miraculously drying up the sea before them, &c., which now they would have occasion sadly to remember. By the way, or, to the way; the Hebrew beth here signifying to, as it doth Genesis 11:4 Leviticus 16:22 Psalms 19:5 91:12 Isaiah 9:8. And the

way seems not to be meant here of the usual road-way from Canaan to Egypt, which was wholly by land, but to be put for the end of the way or journey, even the land of Egypt; for to this, and not to the road-way between Canaan and Egypt, agree the words here following,

whereof I spake unto thee, Thou shalt see it (i.e. Egypt)

no more again. And so that way is put for to that land in a place parallel to this, where the very same words are used, Deuteronomy 17:16, to which this place palpably alludes.

No man shall buy you; either because the number of you captives shall be so great, that the market shall be glutted with you; or because you shall be so loathsome and contemptible that men shall not be willing to have you for slaves. And this was the condition of the Jews after the destruction of Jerusalem, as Josephus the Jew hath left upon record.


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Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Deuteronomy 28:68". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/deuteronomy-28.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

68. And the Lord shall bring thee into Egypt again — This is represented as the crowning calamity. The exodus from Egypt was the beginning of the nation’s life; this threatened return is a symbol of its death.

With ships — Their departure from Egypt had been by a highway that Jehovah opened for them. They marched through the Red Sea. They are to be sent back helpless slaves. Ewald (History of Israel, vol. iv, p. 221, note, English translation) says: “How could it be possible for the composer of Deuteronomy xxviii to conclude a long enumeration of the most various evils with the conveyance of the people back to Egypt in ships? So completely unique an idea could only have been suggested by experience.” But in the Records of the Past, vol. vi, p. 31, is a translation of an Egyptian document of the time of Rameses III., in which the king says: “I made thee galleys, transports, ships of war, with soldiers equipped with their arms on the Great Sea. I gave them captains of the bowmen, and captains of the galleys, provided with numerous crews without number, to bring the things of the land of Taha, and the hinder parts of the earth, to thy great treasuries.”

There ye shall be sold — After the capture of Jerusalem, Titus sent many thousands of captive Jews to Egypt to be sold as slaves. — JOSEPHUS’S Jewish War, Deuteronomy 11:9; Deuteronomy 11:2.

And no man shall buy you — The number would be so great that they would be comparatively worthless.


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Bibliography
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Deuteronomy 28:68". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/deuteronomy-28.html. 1874-1909.

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

Deuteronomy 28:68. The Lord shall bring thee into Egypt — Which was literally fulfilled under Titus, when multitudes of them were carried thither and sold for slaves. With ships — This expression seems to be intended to remind them of that time when they went over the sea without ships, God miraculously drying up the sea before them, a time which now they would have occasion sadly to remember. By the way whereof — That is, to which place or part of the world, namely Egypt; I spake unto thee, thou shalt see it no more again — Referring to what he had said, Deuteronomy 17:16. This is also well illustrated by the bishop. “They had come out of Egypt triumphant, but now they should return thither as slaves. They had walked through the sea as dry land at their coming out, but now they should be carried thither in ships. They might be carried thither in the ships of the Tyrian or Sidonian merchants, or by the Romans, who had a fleet in the Mediterranean, and this was a much safer way of conveying so many prisoners than sending them by land. It appears from Josephus, that in the reigns of the first two Ptolemies many of the Jews were slaves in Egypt. And when Jerusalem was taken by Titus, of the captives who, as we have observed on Deuteronomy 28:62, were sent into Egypt, those under seventeen were sold: but so little care was taken of these captives, that eleven thousand of them perished for want. The markets were overstocked with them, so that Josephus says, in another place, they were sold with their wives and children at the lowest price, there being many to be sold, but few purchasers.” And we learn from St. Jerome, “that after their last overthrow by Adrian, many thousands of them were sold, and those who could not be sold were transported into Egypt, and perished by shipwreck or famine, or were massacred by the inhabitants.” Hegesipus also says, “There were many captives offered for sale, but few buyers, because the Romans disdained to take the Jews for slaves; and there were not Jews remaining to redeem their countrymen.”

We have quoted thus largely from Bishop Newton’s able exposition of these predictions of Moses, because we believe more clear and convincing proof cannot be given of their accomplishment, and are apprehensive that many of our readers have it not in their power to consult his excellent volumes on the prophecies, from which these extracts are taken. His concluding observation is worthy of peculiar attention. “Here are instances of prophecies delivered about three thousand years ago, and yet, as we see, fulfilling in the world at this very time: and what stronger proof can we desire of the divine legation of Moses? How these instances may affect others, I know not; but for myself I must acknowledge they not only convince but astonish me beyond expression. They are truly, as Moses foretold they would be, a sign and a wonder for ever.” “I have heard of a wicked man,” says Mr. Henry, “who, on reading these threatenings, was so enraged, that he tore the leaf out of his Bible.” But to what purpose is it to deface a copy, while the original remains upon record in the divine counsels, by which it is determined that the wages of sin is death, whether men will hear or whether they will forbear. Let us all learn from hence then to stand in awe and not sin.


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Bibliography
Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on Deuteronomy 28:68". Joseph Benson's Commentary. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/deuteronomy-28.html. 1857.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

With ships, so that thou wilt have no means of escaping by flight. (Menochius) --- The Romans had a fleet in the Mediterranean, with which thy would probably convey the captives into Egypt. Josephus (Antiquities xii. 2, &c., and Jewish Wars vii. 16) informs us, that many of the Jews had been conveyed into that country after Jerusalem had been ruined by the Chaldeans; (Calmet) and after it was at last destroyed by the Romans, some of "those who were above 17 years of age, were sent thither in chains to work at the public works;" others were reserved to grace the victor's triumph, or "to be destroyed by the sword, or by wild beasts in the theatres, while those who were under 17, were sold. During the time that Fronto was making the selection, 12,000 were starved to death, either by the cruelty of their keepers, or because they refused food; the multitudes causing it to be very scarce. In the course of the war 97,000 were taken prisoners, and in the siege 1,100,000 perished. For then the whole nation was shut up in prison, as it were by fate, and the city was besieged when full of inhabitants," at the feast of the Passover; "so that the number of those whom the Romans slew publicly, or took prisoners, was greater than ever was destroyed," at once, "by the fury of man, or by the wrath of God." (Ibid.[Josephus, Jewish Wars?] chap. xvii.) Pompey had carried away many captives into Egypt about 120 years before. Pharao Sesac took and pillaged the city, under Roboam, 2 Paralipomenon xii. 2. --- That. Hebrew, "by the way, concerning which I spoke to thee (that is, by returning back, through this wilderness, as thou formerly desiredst,) thou shalt see it no more." --- Set to sale, (venderis,) literally, "shall be sold." After the Jews had been sold, their new masters could not find any to take them off their hands. (Haydock) --- Buy you. Protestants, "there ye shall be sold....and no man shall buy you." Can a man be sold without being bought? Whereas if the verb hithmaccartem was rendered, and ye shall offer yourselves to sale, the sense would be proper, and expressive of the most bitter sufferings. (Kennicott) --- Hegesippus (v. 47,) says, "there were many to be sold, but few purchasers; because the Romans disdained receiving the Jews as slaves, nor were there any Jews left to redeem their countrymen."


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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Deuteronomy 28:68". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/deuteronomy-28.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

into Egypt. So Hosea 8:13; Hosea 9:3. May be put by Figure of speech Metonymy for servitude.

ships. Second occurrence in O.T. See Genesis 49:13.

sold = put up for sale.

buy you. This is the end of Moses" fifth address. See note on Deuteronomy 1:6.


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Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Deuteronomy 28:68". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/deuteronomy-28.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

And the LORD shall bring thee into Egypt again with ships, by the way whereof I spake unto thee, Thou shalt see it no more again: and there ye shall be sold unto your enemies for bondmen and bondwomen, and no man shall buy you.

The Lord shall bring thee into Egypt again with ships. The accomplishment of this prediction took place under Titus, when, according to Josephus, multitudes of Jews were transported in ships to the land of the Nile, and sold as slaves. Those above 17 years of age were despatched to various parts of the Roman empire, to be employed in the public works, or doomed to fight with wild beasts in the amphitheaters. Those under 17 were exposed as slaves in such numbers and such abject circumstances that the market was glutted with them. Thirty were offered for a trifle, and it was often difficult to find a purchaser.

Modern critics, however, prefer to consider Egypt-used here as a type of future bondage and misery-a personification of all the foes of Israel (Hengstenberg, 'Pentateuch,' 1:, p. 123; Delitzsch, p. 27). These curses have been dreadfully fulfilled on apostate Israel, and of this every Jew of every subsequent age has been a living memorial. 'Here, then, are instances of prophecies delivered above 3,000 years ago; and yet, as we see, being fulfilled in the world at this very time; and what stronger proofs can we desire of the divine legation of Moses? How these instances may affect others I know not; but, for myself, I must acknowledge, they not only convince, but amaze and astonish me beyond expression: they are truly, as Moses foretold (Deuteronomy 28:45-46) they would be, a sign and a wonder forever' (Dr. Newton).


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Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Deuteronomy 28:68". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/deuteronomy-28.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(68) The Lord shall bring thee into Egypt again with ships.—Josephus says this was done with many of the Jews by Titus.

Thou shalt see it no more again.—Deuteronomy 17:16.

Ye shall be sold . . . and no man shall buy you.—Rashi explains thus: “Ye shall desire to be sold—ye shall offer yourselves as slaves to your enemies, and shall be refused, because you are appointed to slaughter and destruction. Or the sellers shall sell you to other sellers, and no one will care to keep you.” But the same word is used in the following passage by Nehemiah, “We after our ability have redeemed our brethren the Jews, which were sold to the heathen” (Nehemiah 5:8). Probably the meaning in Deuteronomy is similar: “Ye shall be sold as slaves to your enemies, and there will be no one to redeem you.”


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Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Deuteronomy 28:68". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/deuteronomy-28.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

And the LORD shall bring thee into Egypt again with ships, by the way whereof I spake unto thee, Thou shalt see it no more again: and there ye shall be sold unto your enemies for bondmen and bondwomen, and no man shall buy you.
bring thee into Egypt
This verse seems especially to point out an event, which took place subsequently to the destruction of Jerusalem by Titus, and the desolation made by Hadrian. Numbers of the captives were sent by sea into Egypt (as well as into other countries), and sold for slaves at a vile price, and for the meanest offices; and many thousands were left to perish from want; for the multitude was so great, that purchasers could not be found for them all at any price!
17:16; Jeremiah 43:7; 44:12; Hosea 8:13; 9:3
there ye shall
Exodus 20:2; Nehemiah 5:8; Esther 7:4; Joel 3:3-7; Luke 21:24

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Deuteronomy 28:68". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/deuteronomy-28.html.


Lectionary Calendar
Wednesday, December 12th, 2018
the Second Week of Advent
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