Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Esther 8:3

Then Esther spoke again to the king, fell at his feet, wept and implored him to avert the evil scheme of Haman the Agagite and his plot which he had devised against the Jews.
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Ring;   Salutations;   Thompson Chain Reference - Esther;   Queens;   Women;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Feet, the;   Salutations;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Agag;   Easton Bible Dictionary - Agagite;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Agag;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Esther;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Adoration;   Agagite;   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Agagite ;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Agag;   Amalek;   Smith Bible Dictionary - A'gag;  
Encyclopedias:
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Adoration;   Agagite;   Kitto Biblical Cyclopedia - Attitudes;   The Jewish Encyclopedia - Darius Iii;  
Devotionals:
Every Day Light - Devotion for June 26;  

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Though Haman was dead, his work was not yet undone. The royal decree had gone forth, and, according to Persian notions, could not be directly recalled or reversed Esther 8:8. Mordecai did not dare, without express permission from the king, to take any steps even to stay execution. And Esther, being in favor, once more took the initiative.

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Bibliographical Information
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Esther 8:3". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/esther-8.html. 1870.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

ESTHER ENTREATS THE KING TO CANCEL HAMAN'S EDICT

"And Esther spake yet again before the king, and fell down at his feet, and besought him with tears to put away the mischief of Haman the Agagite, and his device that he had devised against the Jews. Then the king held out to Esther the golden sceptre. So Esther arose, and stood before the king. And she said, If it please the king, and if I have found favor in his sight, and the thing seem right before the king, and if I be pleasing in his eyes, let it be written to reverse the letters devised by Haman, the son of Hammedatha the Agagite, which he wrote to destroy the Jews that are in all the king's provinces: for how can I endure to see the evil that shall come upon my people? or how can I endure to see the destruction of my kindred?"

It is of interest that Mordecai does not carry this urgent request to the king. He was the new First Minister of the empire; but he might have felt that Esther would be more likely to have a favorable reply from the king. At any rate, Esther did it.

"And the king held out to Esther the golden sceptre" (Esther 8:4). This seems to imply that Esther had again approached the king unbidden."[3]

"And (if) I be pleasing in his eyes" (Esther 8:5). Esther's appeal was prefaced with the usual stereotyped phrases used by petitioners; but these words stress Esther's personal attractiveness to the king. This was indeed a delicate feminine touch.

"Reverse the letters devised by Haman" (Esther 8:5). This was indeed exactly what should have been done; and this exceedingly intelligent and tactful queen here gave Ahasuerus a valid reason why he should have done so; but that silly rule about the "Law of the Medes and Persians that altereth not," prevented the king from taking such action. Note the tact of Esther here. "She was careful not to put any blame on the king for Haman's wicked letters."[4]

"Many have accused Esther and her race of cruelty because of their slaughter of their enemies, but without justification. She implored for the bloody edict of Haman to be reversed (Esther 8:5); and if she had been heard, no blood at all would have been shed; but the Gentile mind was not of the kindly sort. Oh no. The king likes to see blood; he is a sportsman. Blood must flow. You Jews defend yourselves. Fight!"[5]

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Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
Bibliographical Information
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Esther 8:3". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/esther-8.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

And Esther spake yet again before the king,.... Went into his presence, without being called for as before, with a new petition:

and fell down at his feet, and besought him with tears; the more to work upon his affections, and move him to grant her request; which she might be the more encouraged to hope for, through the success she already had:

to put away the mischief of Haman the Agagite, and his device that he had devised against the Jews; to revoke, abolish, and make void a mischievous scheme Haman had devised against the Jews, to root out the whole nation of them in the Persian empire.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Esther 8:3". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/esther-8.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

And Esther spake yet again before the king, and fell down at his feet, and besought him with tears to put away the c mischief of Haman the Agagite, and his device that he had devised against the Jews.

(c) Meaning, that he should abolish the wicked decrees, which he had made for the destruction of the Jews.
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Bibliographical Information
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Esther 8:3". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/esther-8.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

Esther spake yet again before the king, and fell down at his feet — The king was then not reclining at table, but sitting on a divan, most probably in the Persian attitude, leaning back against the cushions, and one foot under him.

besought him with tears to put away the mischief of Haman — that is, to repeal the sanguinary edict which, at the secret instigation of Haman, had been recently passed (Esther 3:12).

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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Esther 8:3". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/esther-8.html. 1871-8.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

And Esther spake yet again before the king, and fell down at his feet, and besought him with tears to put away the mischief of Haman the Agagite, and his device that he had devised against the Jews.

To put — To repeal that cruel decree.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
Bibliographical Information
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Esther 8:3". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/esther-8.html. 1765.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Esther 8:3 And Esther spake yet again before the king, and fell down at his feet, and besought him with tears to put away the mischief of Haman the Agagite, and his device that he had devised against the Jews.

Ver. 3. And Esther spake yet again] Having sped so well before, she is encouraged to speak yet again. Heb. She added to speak before the king, Nec his contenta Esther (Vulg.). She had a further request, and having had so free access, and so good success, she takes the boldness to commence it. We should do so when we come before God. Prayer should be multiplied like those arrows of deliverance, 2 Kings 13:18, and our suits reinforced while we speak yet again; as Abraham did in his intercession for Sodom. See, for our encouragement, that fourfold comfortable, yet again uttered by the Lord, Zechariah 1:17.

And fell down at his feet] This was a more humble posture than yet she had used; importing her lowly mind and most earnest desire, whereunto she added tears, these effectual orators ( - Nam lachrymae pondera vocis habent) that prevail with the hardest hearts many times, and alter the strongest resolutions. Hereof we have an instance in our chronicles, which, because it somewhat suiteth with the case in this text, I will here relate: King Edward III, laying siege to Calais, they desired parley, and had this final sentence, that six of the chief burgesses should be sent to the king, bareheaded, barefooted, in their shirts, with halters about their necks, the keys of the town and castle in their hands, and submit themselves to the king’s will; for the residue he was content to take to mercy. Those came, and the king commands them presently to be carried to execution, and would not on any suit be diverted, in regard, as he said of his oath, till the queen, great with child, fell on her knees before him, and with tears obtained their pardon, and had them given unto her. Nescit Antipater? said Alexander the Great. Knoweth not Antipater that one tear of my mother Olympias can easily wash off all his accusations of her to me?

To put away the mischief of Haman the Agagite] She doth not say to reverse the bloody decree of the king of Persia, for this might have irritated that waspish prince, and made him to have rejected her request as unreasonable, impossible. She therefore useth a great deal of commendable prudence ("I wisdom dwell with prudence, and find out knowledge of witty inventions," Proverbs 8:12), and picks out her best time, that she may set her words upon the wheels, as Solomon hath it, Proverbs 25:11, and utter right words that may be forcible, Job 6:25. Such another was Abigail, the woman of Tekoah, and the matron of Abel.

And his device that he had devised against the Jews] All the blame is laid upon Haman, who was indeed a man of wicked devices, and had taken counsel, both crafty and cruel, against God’s people. Him, therefore, she maketh the only author and actor in this business, not once mentioning the king, who yet had ratified the decree, but, by his late dealing with Haman, had sufficiently testified his utter dislike of his own act therein, and cried, Had I wist! ουκ ωμην.

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Bibliographical Information
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Esther 8:3". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/esther-8.html. 1865-1868.

Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary

(3) ¶ And Esther spake yet again before the king, and fell down at his feet, and besought him with tears to put away the mischief of Haman the Agagite, and his device that he had devised against the Jews.

I admire the character of Esther in this particular most eminently, in that she forgot not the state of her brethren in affliction. Haman's proclamation for the destruction of the Jews in all the provinces, signed by the king, and sent forth throughout the empire, was still in force, and the poor captives, no doubt, lay trembling in the expectation of the day. Esther therefore allowed not herself to enter upon the fruit of her services, for her own personal comfort, until she saw them provided for also. I cannot but greatly admire, this conduct in Esther: but while I admire Esther in this, how can I overlook thee, thou blessed Jesus, who, when thou hadst vanquished death, hell, and the grave, and returned to glory, remittedst not thine attention one moment to the concerns of thy people below. And do I not know, thou dear Lord, that such is thine unequalled love to thy redeemed, that never will thy triumphs be complete, till thou hast brought them all around thee in glory, that where thou art, there they may be also.

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Hawker, Robert, D.D. "Commentary on Esther 8:3". "Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pmc/esther-8.html. 1828.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

To put away the mischief of Haman; to repeal that cruel decree, of which see Esther 3:13.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Esther 8:3". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/esther-8.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

3.Esther spake yet again — This was evidently on a subsequent day, and, as appears from the next verse, she again presented herself in the royal presence unsummoned, trusting to the favour of the king.

Fell down at his feet — Her manner now showed more anxiety and feeling than when she appeared the first time in the court. Compare Esther 5:1-2.

Besought him with tears — Literally, wept and made supplication to him. Before, she invited him to a private banquet to make her petition; now she makes it known publicly, and with crying and tears.

The mischief of Haman — The wicked devices of that enemy had not perished with his death. The decree for the destruction of the Jews remained still.

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Esther 8:3". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/esther-8.html. 1874-1909.

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

Esther 8:3. Esther spake yet again before the king — Haman, the chief enemy of the Jews, was hanged, Esther and Mordecai, their chief friends, were sufficiently protected; but many others there were in the king’s dominions that hated the Jews, and desired their ruin, and to their rage and malice all the rest of that people lay exposed. For the edict against them was still in force, in pursuance of which their enemies, at the day appointed, would fall upon them, and they would be deemed rebels against the king and his government, if they should offer to resist, and take up arms in their own defence. To prevent this, the queen makes intercession with much affection and importunity. And fell down at his feet, and besought him with many tears — It was time to be earnest, when the church of God lay at stake. Let none be so great as to be unwilling to stoop, none so joyful as to be unwilling to weep, when thereby they may do any service to God’s church and people. Esther, though safe herself, here falls down and begs with tears for the deliverance of her people. To put away the mischief of Haman — To repeal that cruel and bloody decree which he had obtained from the king.

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Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on Esther 8:3". Joseph Benson's Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/esther-8.html. 1857.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Down. such reverence is due to God's representatives, whatever heretics may say. (Jude 8.)

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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Esther 8:3". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/esther-8.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

mischief. Hebrew. ra"a". App-44. Same word as "evil", Esther 7:7.

Haman the Agagite. See notes on Esther 2:5 with Esther 3:1.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Esther 8:3". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/esther-8.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

And Esther spake yet again before the king, and fell down at his feet, and besought him with tears to put away the mischief of Haman the Agagite, and his device that he had devised against the Jews.

Esther spake yet again before the king, and fell down at his feet. The king was then not reclining at table, but sitting on a divan, most probably in the Persian attitude, leaning back against the cushions, and one foot under him.

Besought him with tears to put away the mischief of Haman - i:e., to repeal the sanguinary edict which, at the secret instigation of Haman, had been recently passed (Esther 3:12).

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Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Esther 8:3". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/esther-8.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(3) Besought him . . . to put away the mischief.—Esther’s work was as yet only half done. She has seen the condemnation of the foe of her race, and the exaltation of her kinsman to his office. But the royal edict sent out against the Jews still remains valid, and being a written decree, sealed with the king’s seal, is supposed to be beyond the possibility of alteration. It was not, therefore, a case where Mordecai’s newly-acquired dignity would authorise him to interfere, and therefore Esther, who, now that the ice is once broken, becomes more courageous, makes a fresh appeal to the king to do what theoretically was beyond the king’s power.

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Esther 8:3". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/esther-8.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

And Esther spake yet again before the king, and fell down at his feet, and besought him with tears to put away the mischief of Haman the Agagite, and his device that he had devised against the Jews.
fell
1 Samuel 25:24; 2 Kings 4:27
besought him with tears
Heb. she wept and besought him.
Isaiah 38:2; Hosea 12:4; Hebrews 5:7
mischief
3:8-15; 7:4
Reciprocal: Proverbs 31:26 - openeth;  Ezekiel 11:2 - GeneralDaniel 6:8 - according

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Bibliographical Information
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Esther 8:3". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/esther-8.html.