Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Esther 8:5

Then she said, "If it pleases the king and if I have found favor before him and the matter seems proper to the king and I am pleasing in his sight, let it be written to revoke the letters devised by Haman, the son of Hammedatha the Agagite, which he wrote to destroy the Jews who are in all the king's provinces.
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Hammedatha;   Ring;   Thompson Chain Reference - Esther;   Queens;   Women;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Agag;   Easton Bible Dictionary - Agagite;   Hammedatha;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Agag;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Apocrypha;   Esther;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Agagite;   Hammedatha;   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Agagite ;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Agag;   Amalek;   Smith Bible Dictionary - A'gag;   Hammed'atha;  
Encyclopedias:
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Agagite;   The Jewish Encyclopedia - Hammedatha;   Kasher;  
Devotionals:
Every Day Light - Devotion for June 26;  

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

And said, if it please the king, and if I have found favour in his sight, and the thing seem right before the king, and I be pleasing in his eyes,.... This heap of phrases, which signify much the same thing, are used to work upon the king's affections, and to show how submissive she was to his will:

let it be written to reverse the letters devised by Haman the son of Hammedatha, the Agagite, which he wrote to destroy the Jews which are in all the king's provinces. She wisely takes no notice of any concern the king had in them, but suggests as that she looked upon them as forged by Haman, who put the king's name and seal to them, without his knowledge and consent.

Copyright Statement
The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Esther 8:5". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/esther-8.html. 1999.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

And said, If it please the king, and if I have found favour in his sight, and the thing seem right before the king, and I be pleasing in his eyes, let it be written to reverse the letters devised by Haman the son of Hammedatha the Agagite, which he wrote to destroy the Jews which are in all the king's provinces:

If … — She uses various expressions, that she might confirm the king's favour, by such a full submission to his good pleasure.

Haman — She prudently takes off the hatefulness of the action from the king, and lay's it upon Haman, who had for his own ends contrived the whole business, and circumvented the king in it.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
Bibliographical Information
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Esther 8:5". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/esther-8.html. 1765.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Esther 8:5 And said, If it please the king, and if I have found favour in his sight, and the thing [seem] right before the king, and I [be] pleasing in his eyes, let it be written to reverse the letters devised by Haman the son of Hammedatha the Agagite, which he wrote to destroy the Jews which [are] in all the king’s provinces:

Ver. 5. And said, If it please the king] See Esther 5:8. Thus, when we pray to God, we must take unto us words, and speak in a low language, as broken men. The poor speaketh supplications, Proverbs 19:28.

And the thing seem right before the king] She taketh not upon her to prescribe, but is willing to subscribe to the king’s good pleasure. Let us do so to the only wise God. John 2:8, the mother of Christ doth not too earnestly in words press him to do that she desired, but only lays open the case, They have no wine, referring all to his discretion; so ought we in our prayers for temporal things. Socrates taught his scholars to ask no more of God but this, that he would do them good; but how, and how much, they should leave that to him, as best understanding what is best and fittest for us. Those in the Gospel that would needs be at a certainty, and bargain with the Master of the vineyard for a penny a day, when they had their penny, they went grumbling away, that it was but a penny, Matthew 20:10-12.

And I be pleasing in his eyes] If my beauty please him, which is the best letter of recommendation to a prince, as the queen mother of France was wont to say.

Let it be written to reverse the letter] She did not request to rule the whole empire for three days, as Semiramis once did; nor to set Persepolis on fire, as Alexander the Great did, at the motion of his concubine; but that the king her husband would revoke and rescind the letters of Haman’s device, that he would by new letters correct and over-rule (as the Vulgate Latin hath it) those formerly devised by Haman, that he would antiquate and abolish the plots and projects of that wicked man. And albeit this request of hers might seem to some uncivil and overly bold; yet in a case of such great consequence, wherein the glory of God, the preservation of his people, and the honour, of the king were so much concerned, she doubteth not to present and prosecute it. Hinc igitur satis est conspicua Esterae sancta audacia, therefore this is enough holy boldness in the eyes of Esther, saith an interpreter; such as was also that of Cranmer in the parliament house, when the Six Articles were in agitation; and that of George, marquis of Brandenburg, who professed at the imperial diet at Ausburg, Malle se flexis ibi coram Caesare genibus, speculatori cervicem feriendam statim praebere, that he would rather lose his head presently there in the presence of the emperor, than to yield his assent to the Popish Interim (Scultet. Annal.).

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Esther 8:5". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/esther-8.html. 1865-1868.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

She useth various expressions, that she might insinuate herself into the king’s favour, by such a full and repeated resignation and submission of herself to the king’s good pleasure.

To reverse the letters devised by Haman; she prudently takes off all the envy and hatefulness of the action from the king, and lays it upon Haman, who had for his own wicked and selfish ends contrived the whole business, and circumvented the king in it; which she allegeth as a reason why it should be repealed, because it was surreptitiously and craftily procured.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Esther 8:5". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/esther-8.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

5.And said — We do well to present Esther’s address here, as at Esther 7:3, in poetical form: —

If to the king it seem good,

And if I have found favour before him,

And the thing seem right before the king,

And I be good in his eyes,

Let it be written to return the letters,

The device of Haman, the son of Hammedatha, the Agagite,

Which he wrote to destroy the Jews,

Who are in all the provinces of the king.

For how can I see the evil that will find my people?

And how can I see the destruction of my kindred?

Perhaps Esther was not sufficiently acquainted with Persian law to know that no royal decree could be reversed.

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Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Esther 8:5". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/esther-8.html. 1874-1909.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

To him. Hebrew adds, "and I be pleasing in his eyes," which had been expressed just before. Yet she might insist on this point, as it shewed a greater regard for the king's pleasure. --- I beseech. Hebrew, "let it be written, to reverse the device of Aman, the son," &c. (Haydock) --- When the edict was not sealed by the nobles, it might be altered; (chap. i. 19.) and at any rate, when the king had been to[too?] visibly imposed upon, in an affair of such consequence, justice dictated that it should not be enforced. (Calmet)

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Esther 8:5". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/esther-8.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

If it please the king. Note the Alternation in this verse: The king. "If it please the king. "Esther. "And if I have found favour. "The king. "And . . . before the king. "Esther. "And I be pleasing in his eyes. "

the Jews. Some codices, with Aram, and Syriac, read "all the Jews".

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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Esther 8:5". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/esther-8.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

And said, If it please the king, and if I have found favour in his sight, and the thing seem right before the king, and I be pleasing in his eyes, let it be written to reverse the letters devised by Haman the son of Hammedatha the Agagite, which he wrote to destroy the Jews which are in all the king's provinces:

Reverse the letters devised by Haman ... to destroy the Jews. The whole conduct of Esther in this matter is characterized by great tact; and the variety of expressions by which she describes her willing submission to her royal husband, the address with which she rolls the whole infamy of the meditated massacre on Haman, and the argument she draws, from the king's sanction being surreptitiously obtained, that the decree should be immediately reversed-all indicate the queen's wisdom and skill; and she succeeded in this point also.

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Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Esther 8:5". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/esther-8.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(5) To reverse.—Rather, to bring back, to recall. Esther shows considerable skill in wording her request. She avoids speaking of the king’s letters, but calls them “the letters, the device of Haman, which he wrote.” It is the king, however, to whom the injury is done—“to destroy the Jews which are in all the king’s provinces.”

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Esther 8:5". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/esther-8.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

And said, If it please the king, and if I have found favour in his sight, and the thing seem right before the king, and I be pleasing in his eyes, let it be written to reverse the letters devised by Haman the son of Hammedatha the Agagite, which he wrote to destroy the Jews which are in all the king's provinces:
and, if I
7:3; Exodus 33:13,16; 1 Samuel 20:29
I be pleasing
2:4,17
letters
Heb. device.
3:12,13
which he wrote
or, who wrote.
Reciprocal: 1 Chronicles 13:4 - the thing;  Nehemiah 2:5 - If it please;  Esther 1:19 - it please the king;  Esther 8:8 - may no man reverse;  Esther 9:3 - the fear;  Proverbs 18:13 - that

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Esther 8:5". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/esther-8.html.