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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Exodus 39:1

Moreover, from the blue and purple and scarlet material, they made finely woven garments for ministering in the holy place as well as the holy garments which were for Aaron, just as the LORD had commanded Moses.

Adam Clarke Commentary

Blue and purple, and scarlet - See this subject largely explained in the notes on Exodus 25:4; (note).


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Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Exodus 39:1". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/exodus-39.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

See the notes to Exodus 28.


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These files are public domain.

Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Exodus 39:1". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/exodus-39.html. 1870.

The Biblical Illustrator

-35

CHAPTER XXXV.

THE CONCLUSION.

Exodus 35:1-35 - Exodus 40:1-38.

The remainder of the narrative sets forth in terms almost identical with the directions already given, the manner in which the Divine injunctions were obeyed. The people, purified in heart by danger, chastisement and shame, brought much more than was required. A quarter of a million would poorly represent the value of the shrine in which, at the last, Moses and Aaron approached their God, while the cloud covered the tent and the glory filled the tabernacle, and Moses failed to overcome his awe and enter.

Thenceforth the cloud was the guide of their halting and their march. Many a time they grieved their God in the wilderness, yet the cloud was on the tabernacle by day, and there was fire therein by night, throughout all their journeyings.

That cloud is seen no longer; but One has said, "Lo, I am with you all the days." If the presence is less material, it is because we ought to be more spiritual.

* * * * *

Looking back upon the story, we can discern more clearly what was asserted when we began--the forming and training of a nation.

They are called from shameful servitude by the devotion of a patriot and a hero, who has learned in failure and exile the difference between self-confidence and faith. The new name of God, and His remembrance of their fathers, inspire them at the same time with awe and hope and nationality. They see the hollowness of earthly force, and of superstitious worships, in the abasement and ruin of Egypt. They are taught by the Paschal sacrifice to confess that the Divine favour is a gift and not a right, that their lives also are justly forfeited. The overthrow of Pharaoh's army and the passage of the Sea brings them into a new and utterly strange life, in an atmosphere and amid scenes well calculated to expand and deepen their emotions, to develop their sense of freedom and self-respect, and yet to oblige them to depend wholly on their God. Privation at Marah chastens them. The attack of Amalek introduces them to war, and forbids their dependence to sink into abject softness. The awful scene of Horeb burns and brands his littleness into man. The covenant shows them that, however little in themselves, they may enter into communion with the Eternal. It also crushes out what is selfish and individualising, by making them feel the superiority of what they all share over anything that is peculiar to one of them. The Decalogue reveals a holiness at once simple and profound, and forms a type of character such as will make any nation great. The sacrificial system tells them at once of the pardon and the heinousness of sin. Religion is both exalted above the world and infused into it, so that all is consecrated. The priesthood and the shrine tell them of sin and pardon, exclusion and hope; but that hope is a common heritage, which none may appropriate without his brother.

The especial sanctity of a sacred calling is balanced by an immediate assertion of the sacredness of toil, and the Divine Spirit is recognised even in the gift of handicraft.

A tragic and shameful failure teaches them, more painfully than any symbolic system of curtains and secret chambers, how little fitted they are for the immediate intercourse of heaven. And yet the ever-present cloud, and the shrine in the heart of their encampment, assure them that God is with them of a truth.


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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Exell, Joseph S. "Commentary on "Exodus 39:1". The Biblical Illustrator. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tbi/exodus-39.html. 1905-1909. New York.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

And of the blue, and purple, and scarlet, they made cloths of service,.... Jarchi observes that there is no mention made of linen, because these were not the priestly garments in which there was linen; but these were they with which they covered the vessels of the sanctuary when they journeyed; and so says Aben Ezra; and those were covered with cloths of blue, purple, and scarlet, Numbers 4:5 though some think these were clothes wore by the priests:

to do service in the holy place: and which they only wore when in it, and employed in the service of it; and therefore what follows must be by way of explanation:

and made the holy garments for Aaron, as the Lord commanded Moses; the particulars of which are given in the following verses.


Copyright Statement
The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Exodus 39:1". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/exodus-39.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

And of the blue, and purple, and scarlet, they made a cloths of service, to do service in the holy [place], and made the holy garments for Aaron; as the LORD commanded Moses.

(a) As coverings for the ark, the candlestick, the altars and such like.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Exodus 39:1". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/exodus-39.html. 1599-1645.

Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary

CONTENTS

In this Chapter we have the account of the work of the tabernacle being finished. The last things in order among the tabernacle furniture, are the forming the holy garments for the priests: the ephod, the breast-plate, the robe of the ephod; the coats, bonnets, and girdle, and the plate of the holy crown. Moses examines, and gives his approbation of the whole.


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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Hawker, Robert, D.D. "Commentary on Exodus 39:1". "Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pmc/exodus-39.html. 1828.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

And of the blue, and purple, and scarlet, they made cloths of service, to do service in the holy place, and made the holy garments for Aaron; as the LORD commanded Moses.

The priests garments are called here clothes of service - Those that wear robes of honour must look upon them as clothes of service; for those upon whom honour is put, from them service is expected. Holy garments were not made for men to sleep in, but to do service in, and then they are indeed for glory and beauty. These also were shadows of good things to come, but the substance is Christ. He is our great high priest; he put upon him the clothes of service when he undertook the work of our redemption; arrayed himself with the gifts and graces of the Spirit, which he received not by measure; charged himself with all God's spiritual Israel, bare them on his shoulder, carried them in his bosom, and presented them in the breast-plate of judgment unto his Father. And, lastly, he crowned himself with holiness to the Lord, consecrated his whole undertaking to the honour of his Fathers holiness. And all true believers are spiritual priests. The clean linen with which all their clothes of service must be made, is the righteousness of saints: and holiness to the Lord must be so written upon their foreheads, that all who converse with them may see they bear the image of God's holiness.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.

Bibliography
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Exodus 39:1". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/exodus-39.html. 1765.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

1.And of the blue, and purple, and scarlet. The description of the sacerdotal garments, which is repeated in this chapter, is more accurate than it would have been had he been speaking of some unimportant matter. And assuredly, since Christ was vividly represented in the person of the high priest, this was a most important part of the legal service. We have elsewhere set forth how far it was from being an empty pomp, as when the Popish sacrificers now-a-days, in order to acquire dignity, dazzle the eyes of the simple by the splendor of their vestments, and their magnificent paraphernalia; but that rather it was for the purpose of placing before men’s eyes all that faith ought to consider in Jesus Christ. We have especially seen how great mysteries were contained in the mitre, which was Holiness to the Lord: and in the ephod, in which shone forth the light of truth and integrity of life, and in which were the symbols of the ten tribes, so that the priest bore the people itself upon his shoulders and before his breast, in such a manner that in the person of one all might be presented familiarly before God. For this reason he repeats seven times the clause, “as the Lord commanded Moses;” which certainly has the effect of awakening attention.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.

Bibliography
Calvin, John. "Commentary on Exodus 39:1". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/exodus-39.html. 1840-57.

Expositor's Bible Commentary

-35

CHAPTER XXXV.

THE CONCLUSION.

Exodus 35:1-35 - Exodus 40:1-38.

The remainder of the narrative sets forth in terms almost identical with the directions already given, the manner in which the Divine injunctions were obeyed. The people, purified in heart by danger, chastisement and shame, brought much more than was required. A quarter of a million would poorly represent the value of the shrine in which, at the last, Moses and Aaron approached their God, while the cloud covered the tent and the glory filled the tabernacle, and Moses failed to overcome his awe and enter.

Thenceforth the cloud was the guide of their halting and their march. Many a time they grieved their God in the wilderness, yet the cloud was on the tabernacle by day, and there was fire therein by night, throughout all their journeyings.

That cloud is seen no longer; but One has said, "Lo, I am with you all the days." If the presence is less material, it is because we ought to be more spiritual.

* * * * *

Looking back upon the story, we can discern more clearly what was asserted when we began--the forming and training of a nation.

They are called from shameful servitude by the devotion of a patriot and a hero, who has learned in failure and exile the difference between self-confidence and faith. The new name of God, and His remembrance of their fathers, inspire them at the same time with awe and hope and nationality. They see the hollowness of earthly force, and of superstitious worships, in the abasement and ruin of Egypt. They are taught by the Paschal sacrifice to confess that the Divine favour is a gift and not a right, that their lives also are justly forfeited. The overthrow of Pharaoh's army and the passage of the Sea brings them into a new and utterly strange life, in an atmosphere and amid scenes well calculated to expand and deepen their emotions, to develop their sense of freedom and self-respect, and yet to oblige them to depend wholly on their God. Privation at Marah chastens them. The attack of Amalek introduces them to war, and forbids their dependence to sink into abject softness. The awful scene of Horeb burns and brands his littleness into man. The covenant shows them that, however little in themselves, they may enter into communion with the Eternal. It also crushes out what is selfish and individualising, by making them feel the superiority of what they all share over anything that is peculiar to one of them. The Decalogue reveals a holiness at once simple and profound, and forms a type of character such as will make any nation great. The sacrificial system tells them at once of the pardon and the heinousness of sin. Religion is both exalted above the world and infused into it, so that all is consecrated. The priesthood and the shrine tell them of sin and pardon, exclusion and hope; but that hope is a common heritage, which none may appropriate without his brother.

The especial sanctity of a sacred calling is balanced by an immediate assertion of the sacredness of toil, and the Divine Spirit is recognised even in the gift of handicraft.

A tragic and shameful failure teaches them, more painfully than any symbolic system of curtains and secret chambers, how little fitted they are for the immediate intercourse of heaven. And yet the ever-present cloud, and the shrine in the heart of their encampment, assure them that God is with them of a truth.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Nicoll, William R. "Commentary on Exodus 39:1". "Expositor's Bible Commentary". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/teb/exodus-39.html.

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

Exodus 39:1. The tabernacle and its court being now fitted for divine service, the next things to be wrought were the robes of the high-priest and priests, to be put on when they did service in the holy place. Hence these garments are termed clothes of service. And “those that wear robes of honour,” says Henry, “must look upon them as clothes of service; for, from them upon whom honour is put, service is expected. Holy garments were not made for men to sleep in, but to do service in, and then they are indeed for glory and beauty.” These also were shadows of good things to come, but the substance is Christ. He is our great High-Priest; he put upon him the clothes of service when he undertook the work of our redemption; arrayed himself with the gifts and graces of the Spirit, which he received not by measure; charged himself with all God’s spiritual Israel, bare them on his shoulder, carried them in his bosom, and presented them in the breast-plate of judgment unto his Father. And, lastly, he crowned himself with holiness to the Lord, consecrated his whole undertaking to the honour of his Father’s holiness. And all true believers are spiritual priests. The clean linen, with which all their clothes of service must be made, is the righteousness of saints: and holiness to the Lord must be so written upon their foreheads, that all who converse with them may see they bear the image of God’s holiness.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on Exodus 39:1". Joseph Benson's Commentary. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/exodus-39.html. 1857.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Vestments. Hebrew distinguishes, "the clothes of service" destined to fold up the tabernacle and vessels, from "the holy garments of Aaron."


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Exodus 39:1". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/exodus-39.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

holy. See note on Exodus 3:5.

as = according as. Note this in each of the seven-fold repetition of the words "as the LORD commanded Moses" in this record of the completion of the work: and again in the work of the setting up of the tabernacle, Exo 40. Thus in Exodus 39:1, Exodus 39:5, Exodus 39:7, Exodus 39:21, Exodus 39:26, Exodus 39:29, and Exodus 39:31; and in Exodus 40:19, Exodus 40:21, Exodus 40:23, Exodus 40:25, Exodus 40:27, Exodus 40:29, and Exodus 40:32, the former is followed by the blessing of Moses, and the latter by the blessing of Jehovah. See the Structure "Q", p. 124.

the LORD. Hebrew. Jehovah. App-4.


Copyright Statement
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Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Exodus 39:1". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/exodus-39.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

And of the blue, and purple, and scarlet, they made cloths of service, to do service in the holy place, and made the holy garments for Aaron; as the LORD commanded Moses.

Cloths of service - official robes. The ephod of the high priest, the robe of the ephod, the girdle of needlework, and the broidered coat were all of fine linen; for on no material less delicate could such elaborate symbolical figures have been portrayed in embroidery, and all beautified with the same brilliant colours. (See the note at Exodus 28:1-43.)


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Exodus 39:1". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/exodus-39.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(1) Cloths of service.—See Note on Exodus 31:10.


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Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Exodus 39:1". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/exodus-39.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

And of the blue, and purple, and scarlet, they made cloths of service, to do service in the holy place, and made the holy garments for Aaron; as the LORD commanded Moses.
the blue
25:4; 26:1; 35:23
cloths
31:10; 35:19
holy place
Psalms 93:5; Ezekiel 43:12; Hebrews 9:12,25
the holy
28:2-4; 31:10; Ezekiel 42:14

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Exodus 39:1". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/exodus-39.html.

Lectionary Calendar
Sunday, October 20th, 2019
the Week of Proper 24 / Ordinary 29
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