Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Ezekiel 30:22

Therefore thus says the Lord God , ‘Behold, I am against Pharaoh king of Egypt and will break his arms, both the strong and the broken; and I will make the sword fall from his hand.
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Pharaoh;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Egypt;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Ethiopia;   Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Egypt;   Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Repentance;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Egypt;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

I will cause the sword to fall out of his hand - When the arm is broken, the sword will naturally fall. But these expressions show that the Egyptians would be rendered wholly useless to Zedekiah, and should never more recover their political strength. This was the case from the time of the rebellion of Amasis.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Bibliographical Information
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Ezekiel 30:22". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/ezekiel-30.html. 1832.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Therefore thus saith the Lord God, behold, I am against Pharaoh king of Egypt,.... The then present king of Egypt, whose name was Hophra or Apries, Jeremiah 44:30,

and I will break his arms, the strong, and that which was broken: both his arms, the sound and the broken one, his whole power, strength, and dominion; meaning that that part of his kingdom which lay between the two rivers of Egypt and Euphrates, that had been taken away by the king of Babylon, should remain so; and the other part of his kingdom should fall a prey to him also:

and I will cause the sword to fall out of his hand; so that he should be so far from being so able to make use of the sword, that he should not be able to hold it; it should drop out of his hand; nor should he be able to take it up again, and make war, either offensive or defensive.

Copyright Statement
The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Ezekiel 30:22". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/ezekiel-30.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

Therefore thus saith the Lord GOD; Behold, I [am] against Pharaoh king of Egypt, and will break g his arms, the strong, and that which was broken; and I will cause the sword to fall out of his hand.

(g) His force and power.
Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Ezekiel 30:22". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/ezekiel-30.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

arms — Not only the “one arm” broken already (Ezekiel 30:21) was not to be healed, but the other two should be broken. Not a corporal wound, but a breaking of the power of Pharaoh is intended.

cause  …  sword to fall out of  …  hand — deprive him of the resources of making war.

Copyright Statement
These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Ezekiel 30:22". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/ezekiel-30.html. 1871-8.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

Therefore thus saith the Lord GOD; Behold, I am against Pharaoh king of Egypt, and will break his arms, the strong, and that which was broken; and I will cause the sword to fall out of his hand.

His arms — Both his arms.

The strong — That part of his kingdom which remains entire.

Broken — That which was shattered before.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
Bibliographical Information
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Ezekiel 30:22". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/ezekiel-30.html. 1765.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Ezekiel 30:22 Therefore thus saith the Lord GOD Behold, I [am] against Pharaoh king of Egypt, and will break his arms, the strong, and that which was broken; and I will cause the sword to fall out of his hand.

Ver. 22. And will break his arms.] I will utterly disable him, and drive the field of him. He shall neither be able to defend himseff or offend his enemy. See Psalms 37:17.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Ezekiel 30:22". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/ezekiel-30.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Ezekiel 30:22. The strong, and that which was broken The strong arm as well as the wounded. Houbigant. "I will break Pharaoh, by the revolt of his subjects, by the war which Amasis shall bring upon him; and afterwards by that of Nebuchadrezzar; and all this in the space of fourteen or fifteen years." See Calmet.

REFLECTIONS.—1st, Fearful is the overthrow of the Egyptians here recorded.

1. They are called to howl, and lament the dreadful day, big with wrath, and swift approaching; a day of darkness and gloominess, when every face should gather blackness. It shall be the time of the heathen; either the time to visit the heathen nations of Egypt and Ethiopia, or the time of the Chaldean power. Note; The sinner's day, though long delayed, shall come at last; and then, too late, he will pour forth his remediless sorrows.

2. The threatened destruction shall utterly ruin both Egypt and her confederates. The sword of the victorious king of Babylon shall fill the land, from one end to the other, with the carcases of the slain; the cities shall be destroyed, the images broken, the country made desolate, terrors spread on every side, the beauty, strength, and multitude of Egypt utterly wasted, and the dark cloud of abject wretchedness spread over them. Thus shall a fierce and terrible enemy, from a strange and distant land, wicked men, whom no laws of humanity or justice restrain, be let loose upon them, and ravage without mercy. The pride of Egypt, her royal family, shall be extinct, and no hopes remain from the rising generation, the young men being slain with the sword, and the daughters gone into captivity. Nor shall her auxiliaries be able to give her the least support; they shall fall with her, Ethiopia, Lybia, Lydia, Chub, and all the mingled people of various nations, who are in league with Egypt, shall perish. And while many out of these countries, who sojourned among the Egyptians, or were auxiliaries in their army, fell with them, the tidings of the destruction shall fly swift to the careless Ethiopians, and terrify them with the apprehensions of sharing Egypt's fate. Nor are their apprehensions groundless; for, Lo! it cometh. Note; (1.) Confederates in iniquity will perish together. (2.) When we see our neighbour's house on fire, it is time to tremble for our own: one sinner's fall should alarm the survivors.

3. God's hand is visible in the judgment. Whatever instrument he employs, the work is his own. His veracity is engaged for the fulfilment of the threatening; and, in the judgments that he will execute, his power and faithfulness will appear, and they shall know that he is the Lord. Note; (1.) Whatever judgments are in the earth, God's hand is to be seen and acknowledged in them. (2.) One jot or tittle of God's word shall never fail.

2nd, The army of the Egyptians, which had attempted to raise the siege of Jerusalem, had been now forced to retire with shame to their own land, and, without making any farther efforts, left Jerusalem to her fate; but their own ruin quickly followed. It is foretold,

1. That Egypt shall be weakened by degrees, and brought to destruction. One arm of Pharaoh was already broken in the defeat received at Carchemish, Jeremiah 46:2 and the conquest of a part of the Egyptian dominions, 2 Kings 24:7 and from this fatal stroke he never recovered; a second blow would complete his ruin. His strong arm, like that which was broken, God will break by the sword of Nebuchadrezzar: so that, unable to wield a sword, groaning as a soldier desperately wounded, he must fall. His kingdom shall be vanquished, his people dispersed and led into captivity. And in these sufferings, which God inflicts, he will make them know that he is the Lord.

2. The king of Babylon shall grow stronger and stronger. God will put a sword into his hands, give him might to wield it, and subdue Egypt before him. All power is given from above: the strength of the mightiest is derived alone from the Almighty God.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Ezekiel 30:22". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/ezekiel-30.html. 1801-1803.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

In the former verse God had broken the arm, in this he will break the arms of Pharaoh, he will show he is still against Pharaoh, and will break him more and more.

The strong; that part of his kingdom which remains entire.

That which was broken; that which was shattered before, that part of his kingdom in Syria, taken from him, from Euphrates to the river of Egypt; that once was a strong arm, but now is broken and useless to him: and Egypt, whatever strength it now hath, shall be as weak and useless too; thus all his power and strength shall be destroyed.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Ezekiel 30:22". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/ezekiel-30.html. 1685.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

Behold. Figure of speech Asterismos. App-6.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Ezekiel 30:22". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/ezekiel-30.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

Therefore thus saith the Lord GOD Behold, I am against Pharaoh king of Egypt, and will break his arms, the strong, and that which was broken; and I will cause the sword to fall out of his hand.

And will break his arms - not only the 'one arm' broken already (Ezekiel 30:21) was not to be healed, but the other also should be broken. In contrast to "I will strengthen the arms of the king of Babylon" ( Ezekiel 30:24).

The strong, and that which was broken - i:e., I will break both the strong arm and that which was already broken. I will impair both the resources of Egypt which still remain intact and those which are already impaired. The one arm of Egypt already broken was all the region from the Nile to the Euphrates, which Nebuchadnezzar had already taken from him (2 Kings 24:7); the arm still intact, but presently to be broken, is Egypt proper itself. Thus all power of carrying on war would be taken from him. Not a corporal wound, but a breaking of the power of Pharaoh is intended.

I will cause the sword to fall out of his hand - I will deprive him of the resources of making war.

Remarks:

(1) The prophecy against Egypt is very full, because Egypt was the oldest enemy of Israel, and her perpetual seducer to idolatry and creature-confidences. The judgment on Egypt is an earnest of the world-wide judgment which shall fall ultimately on all the pagan enemies of God (Ezekiel 30:3), when the times of the Gentiles shall be fulfilled (Luke 19:24). That day of the Lord shall be the day of His visitation in wrath upon those Gentiles who shall have resisted all the offers of His mercy in this His day of visitation in love. Let us be wise in time, that so that day may be to us not a day of terror, but a day of joy in the prospect of immediate redemption.

(2) Not, only Egypt herself, but also all 'who uphold her,' should fall (Ezekiel 30:6); and among these Johanan and the Jews who "leagued" themselves with her (Ezekiel 30:5), in direct violation of God's prohibition (Jer. 42:44 ). They who take part with God's enemies shall share with them in their awful punishment.

(3) As sinners perversely refuse to know God as a God of love, they shall know Him as a God that hates sin, and takes vengeance on the sinner for all unatoned guilt (Ezekiel 30:8). Severe as were the temporal judgments on Pharaoh and his people, what are they when compared with the eternal judgments which shall descend on the lost? Let us flee, while yet there is time, to Him who is our only Saviour from the wrath to come, and from the "fire" (Ezekiel 30:8) which shall never be quenched.

(4) The artificial canals and "rivers" (Ezekiel 30:12) of Egypt, whence that country derived its fertility, were all to be dried up by the judgment of God. Whenever He pleases to punish a people, no resources can avail against His power and will; He dries up at will the springs of their prosperity: "He turneth rivers into a wilderness, and the water-springs into dry ground; a fruitful land into barrenness, for the wickedness of them that dwell therein" (Psalms 107:33-34).

(5) The wrath of God is especially directed against "the idols" of a land (Ezekiel 30:13), of whatever kind they be, whether they be images directly worshipped as gods, or riches which steal away from God the hearts of those who would repudiate the charge of idolatry, though guilty of it before the God who calls covetousness idolatry. As the Egyptian On, the seat of the idolatrous sun-worship in Egypt, was doomed by God to become Aven, or vanity, so all creature-confidences shall at last prove vain to those who have trusted in them rather than in God.

(6) Ere long "a cloud" of calamity "shall cover" every authority like Egypt which exalts itself against God; the "pomp" of man's power shall cease, and the "yoke" which human tyrants have imposed on the people of God shall be broken (Ezekiel 30:18). Whereas God was about to "strengthen the arms of the king of Babylon" (Ezekiel 30:24), the executioner of God's judicial wrath, He was about to 'break both arms of Pharaoh,' the object of His displeasure (Ezekiel 30:22; Ezekiel 30:24). As Israel and Judah had been scattered among the nations, owing to the corrupting influence of Egypt, which brought God's wrath on the elect nation, so the Egyptians themselves, in righteous retribution, were be scattered among the nations (Ezekiel 30:23; Ezekiel 30:26). It is in vain that men try to bind up and heal the wound that God inflicts (Ezekiel 30:21). Stroke shall fall upon stroke in rapid succession whensoever God is against men. The very weakest instruments are sufficient, when strengthened by Him, to execute God's vengeance; and He has at His disposal all the powers that are in heaven and earth. How foolish, then, it is for any to remain in a state of enmity with God! Rather let the sinner, ere the stroke descends, take hold of God's strength, that he may make peace with God, and He shall make peace with him (Isaiah 27:5).

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Ezekiel 30:22". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/ezekiel-30.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(22) The strong, and that which was broken—i.e., the whole power of Egypt, both in so far as already crippled, and in so far as it still retained strength.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Ezekiel 30:22". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/ezekiel-30.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Therefore thus saith the Lord GOD; Behold, I am against Pharaoh king of Egypt, and will break his arms, the strong, and that which was broken; and I will cause the sword to fall out of his hand.
I am
29:3; Jeremiah 46:25
will break
Psalms 37:17
the strong
34:16
and that
2 Kings 24:7; Jeremiah 37:7; 46:1-12
I will
Jeremiah 46:21-25
Reciprocal: Job 22:9 - arms;  Job 38:15 - the high;  Psalm 10:15 - Break;  Ezekiel 32:11 - The sword;  Nahum 3:19 - no;  Zechariah 11:17 - his arm

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Ezekiel 30:22". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/ezekiel-30.html.