Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Ezra 6:22

And they observed the Feast of Unleavened Bread seven days with joy, for the Lord had caused them to rejoice, and had turned the heart of the king of Assyria toward them to encourage them in the work of the house of God, the God of Israel.
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Feasts;   Fellowship;   Heart;   Joy;   Liberality;   Thompson Chain Reference - Joy;   Joy-Sorrow;   Spiritual;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Alliance and Society with the Enemies of God;   Heart, the;   Joy;   Medo-Persian Kingdom;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Assyria;   Haggai;   Easton Bible Dictionary - Pentateuch;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Ezra, the Book of;   Jeshua;   Nehemiah;   Nehemiah, the Book of;   Pul (2);   Zerubbabel;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Ezra, Book of;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Darius;   Ezra, Book of;   Nehemiah, Book of;   Passover and Feast of Unleavened Bread;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Thessalonians Epistles to the;  
Encyclopedias:
Condensed Biblical Cyclopedia - Babylonish Captivity, the;   International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Zechariah, Book of;   The Jewish Encyclopedia - Esdras, Books of;   Hellenism;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

Turned the heart of the king of Assyria - I am of Calmet's mind, that king of Assyria is here put for king of Persia. Cyrus and his successors possessed all the rights and estates of the ancient kings of Assyria, and therefore the same monarch may be styled king of Assyria as well as king of Persia.

Darius had a very high character, as a wise, just, and merciful prince. To strengthen his title to the crown, he married two of the daughters of Cyrus, and, no doubt, to show his affection to this family, he the more cheerfully confirmed the edict which Cyrus had made in favor of the Jews.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Bibliographical Information
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Ezra 6:22". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/ezra-6.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

The king of Assyria - i. e., Darius. Assyria had so long been the great monarchy of western Asia that the sacred writers continue the title to those who had inherited the old Assyrian power, as first to the Babylonians 2 Kings 23:29, and secondly to the Persians. With similar inexactness we find Herodotus calling Cyrus “king of the Medes.”

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Bibliographical Information
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Ezra 6:22". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/ezra-6.html. 1870.

The Biblical Illustrator

Ezra 6:22

For the Lord had made them joyful.

God the joy-bringer

I. God is the joy-maker.

1. The object of much that God does is simply the blessedness of human hearts. The poorest creature that lives has a right to ask of God the satisfaction of its instincts, and every man has a claim on God to make him glad. God pays all cheques legitimately drawn on Him, and regards Himself as occupied in a manner entirely congruous with His magnificence and infinitude, when He stoops to put some kind of vibrating gladnesses into the wings of a gnat that dances for an hour in the sunshine, and into the heart of a man that lives his time for only a very little longer.

2. God’s method of making us glad is by putting Himself into us. The secret of all true human well-being is close communion with God.

3. By His providences He gives the secondary and lower gifts which men according to their circumstances need. He gives whatever is contributory to any kind of gladness; and if we are wise we shall trace all to Him. Our common mercies are His love-tokens and they all come to us just as the gifts of parents to their children do, with this on the fly-leaf, “With a father’s love.”

II. The obligation and wisdom of taking our god-given joys.

1. Be sure you take Him. When He is waiting to pour all His love into your heart, and all His sweetness into your spirit, to calm your anxieties, to deepen your blessedness; to strengthen everything that is good in you; to be to you a stay in the midst of crumbling prosperity and a light in the midst of the gathering darkness, be sure that you take the joy that waits your acceptance.

2. Recognise Him in all common mercies, because He is at the back of them all. Everything ought to be vocal to us of the loving-kindness of our Father in heaven. Link Him with everything that makes your heart glad. God does not desire to be put away high up on a pedestal above our lives, as if He regulated the great things and the trifles regulated themselves; but He seeks to come as air into the lungs, into every particle of the mass of life, and to fill it all with His purifying presence.

3. Recognise Him in common joys.

4. Be sure that you use the joys which He gives. There are two ways in which you can look at the world and at everything that befalls you. There is enough in everybody’s life to make him sad if he selects these things to dwell upon. There is enough in everybody’s life to make him continually glad if he wisely picks out these things to think about. It depends altogether on the angle at which you look at your life what you see about it. For instance, you know how children do when they get a bit of a willow wand into their possession. They cut off rings of bark and get the switch alternately white and black, white and black, and so on right to the tip. Whether will you look at the white rings or the black ones? They are both there, but if you rightly look at the black you will find out that there is white below it, and it only needs a very little stripping off of a film to make it into white too. No Christian man has a right to regard anything that God’s providence brings to him as such unmingled evil that it ought to make him sad. We are bound to “rejoice in the Lord alway.”

5. Be sure that you limit your delights by God-made joys. There is nothing sadder than the joys that come into a life and do not come from God. Let us see to it that we do not fill our cisterns with poisonous sewage, when. God is waiting to fill them with the pure river of the water of life. Does my joy help me to come near to God? Does it interfere with my communion with Him? Does it aid me in the consecration of myself? Does my conscience go with it when my conscience is most awake? The alternative presented to each of us is whether we will have surface joy and a centre of dark discontent, or surface sorrow and a centre of calm blessedness. The film of stagnant water on a pond of rottenness simulates the glories of the rainbow, in which pure sunshine falls upon the pure drops, “but it is only painted corruption after all, and if a man put his lips to it, it will kill him. Such is the joy which is apart from God.” (A. Maclaren, D. D.)

Cheerfulness

Cheerfulness is the root of constancy; for there is no more shifty and unreliable person than your curmudgeon, who is the slave of his own caprices; it is the best assurance of life, health, and wealth; it is the sign and evidence of steady and energetic mind. It will make a fruitful youth, a happy manhood, and a serene old age. It is the “open sesame” to many secrets which the discontented and peevish strive hard to discover but always miss; it is the magic medium of friendship, if not even of love; where there may be lack of special tastes and sympathies, cheerfulness will do much to supply their place. As water to the flower, so is cheerfulness to the mind. It keeps all green and sweet, and sends forth a gracious savour that is imperceptible, but wins all by its perfume. By cheerfulness a man’s powers of work and production are doubled; he has, as it were, taken in a set of working partners most ready to aid him in every task and enterprise. Cheerfulness keeps all the faculties in good condition, so that they are ever ready to do their utmost without strain. (Dr. Japp, in the “Argosy”.)
.

Joy favourable to religion: sing and rejoice

One bright summer’s day we noticed a lark; at first we could not see it, but with the eye shaded by an uplifted hand it was soon detected. There it flew, a little speck, a dim spot in the Italian-blue sky, pouring down floods of music. On it went, higher and higher; as long as it sang and rejoiced, it arose. But when the song ceased its flight ceased too. Thus is it with our souls; they ascend Godwards while we sing and rejoice. “Rejoice in the Lord; for you it is safe”; take refuge in the citadel of heaven-sent bliss, and you are secure against many a Satanic attack. (T. R. Stevenson.)
.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Exell, Joseph S. "Commentary on "Ezra 6:22". The Biblical Illustrator. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tbi/ezra-6.html. 1905-1909. New York.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

And kept the feast of unleavened bread seven days with joy,.... Which immediately followed upon the passover, Exodus 12:18,

for the Lord had made them joyful; the building of the temple being finished, and the service of it restored to its original purity:

and turned the heart of the king of Assyria unto them, to strengthen their hands in the work of the house of God, the God of Israel; by giving them leave to go on in building the temple, and by encouraging and assisting them in it till they had finished it; this was Darius Artaxerxes, who, though called king of Persia, was also king of Assyria, being possessed of the Assyrian monarchy, as his predecessors were upon the taking of Babylon, and the same is therefore called also the king of Babylon, Nehemiah 13:6. God, the God of Israel, who has the hearts of all men in his hands, and so the hearts of kings, and can turn them at his pleasure, inclined his heart to do them good, which was matter of joy unto them, see Ezra 7:27.

Copyright Statement
The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Ezra 6:22". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/ezra-6.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

And kept the feast of unleavened bread seven days with joy: for the LORD had made them joyful, and turned the heart of the king of k Assyria unto them, to strengthen their hands in the work of the house of God, the God of Israel.

(k) Meaning Darius who was king of the Medes, Persians and Assyrians.
Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Ezra 6:22". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/ezra-6.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

kept the feast … with joy: for the Lord … turned the heart of the king of Assyria unto them — that is, king of the Persian empire, which now included the possessions, and had surpassed the glory, of Assyria. The favorable disposition which Darius had evinced towards the Jews secured them peace and prosperity and the privileges of their own religion during the rest of his reign. The religious joy that so remarkably characterized the celebration of this feast, was testified by expressions of lively gratitude to God, whose overruling power and converting grace had produced so marvelous a change in the hearts of the mighty potentates, and disposed them, pagans though they were, to aid the cause and provide for the worship of the true God.

Copyright Statement
These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Ezra 6:22". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/ezra-6.html. 1871-8.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

And kept the feast of unleavened bread seven days with joy: for the LORD had made them joyful, and turned the heart of the king of Assyria unto them, to strengthen their hands in the work of the house of God, the God of Israel.

Joyful — He had given them both cause to rejoice, and hearts to rejoice. God is the fountain whence all the streams of true joy flow.

Of Assyria — Of the king of Persia, who was now king of Assyria also, here so called emphatically, to note the great power and goodness of God in turning the hearts of these great monarchs, whose predecessors had been the chief persecutors and oppressors of God's people.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
Bibliographical Information
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Ezra 6:22". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/ezra-6.html. 1765.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Ezra 6:22 And kept the feast of unleavened bread seven days with joy: for the LORD had made them joyful, and turned the heart of the king of Assyria unto them, to strengthen their hands in the work of the house of God, the God of Israel.

Ver. 22. And kept the feast of unleavened bread] See 1 Corinthians 7:8, Exodus 12:35, with the notes.

Seven days] This began on the fifteenth day, and lasted till the one and twentieth day, Numbers 28:16-17, Exodus 34:25.

With joy] {See Trapp on "Ezra 6:16"}

For the Lord had made them joyful] Given them cause of joy, and a heart enlarged accordingly, a mind right set for the purpose. St James’s word, ευθυμειν, James 5:13, shows that all true mirth is from the rectitude of a man’s mind, which God only giveth.

And turned the heart of the king] It is he alone that gives favour, that frameth men’s opinions and affections, that maketh a good man’s enemies to be at peace with him.

To strengthen their hands] As Ezra 6:8. And this did more ennoble him than all his warlike achievements.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Ezra 6:22". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/ezra-6.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Ver. 22. The king of Assyria Darius is called the king of Assyria, as now reigning over all the kingdoms which were formerly under the power of the Assyrians. And from hence Archbishop Usher infers, that Babylon, which in the beginning of his reign had revolted, must necessarily have been reduced by Darius before this time; otherwise he thinks he could not have been styled king of Assyria, whereof Babylon was the metropolis. Dr. Prideaux gives this character of Darius: "He was a prince of great wisdom, clemency, and justice; and has the honour to be recorded in holy writ for a favourer of God's people, a restorer of his temple at Jerusalem, and a promoter of his worship therein. For all this God was pleased to make him his instrument; and with respect to this, I doubt not, it was, that he blessed him with a numerous issue, a long reign, and great prosperity."

REFLECTIONS.—1st, We have in this chapter,

1. Search made, in consequence of the application, after the original record in the house of the rolls; and it was found in Achmetha, thought to be Ecbatana, the summer residence of the kings of Babylon; and it contained not only a commission for building the house, but a command to the governors to furnish out of the revenue all necessary materials; which privilege, it seems, the Jews either generously waved, or the change of affairs at court prevented their receiving the benefit of this order. Note; (1.) Diligent inquiry after truth is necessary, in order to administer impartial justice. (2.) It is often prudent to decline making use of those offers which the generosity of our friends may put in our power.

2. Darius, hereupon perfectly satisfied, confirms the edict in its full extent. As, probably, the interruption the work had met with from the malice of the former governors now appeared, he charges them to give the Jews no hindrance or molestation; commands them to furnish all necessary materials for the building, and the sacrifices and offerings which they needed, out of the revenues; speaks with deep respect of Israel's God, and puts a high value on the prayers of this favoured people, low as they were now reduced. He enforces the decree with the penalty of death on any man who dared counteract it; "Let him be hanged on the beams of his own house, and let it be made a dunghill to perpetuate the infamy:" and, as highly zealous for the honour of that glorious God, whose presence had formerly so distinguished this house, and he supposes would again, he denounces a curse on the king or people who should ever after attempt to alter the worship, or destroy the temple. He concludes with commanding immediate execution of his orders. Note. (1.) The Lord can over-rule the malice of the church's enemies, and bring good out of their evil designs. (2.) They are, through God's good providence, often made instrumental in carrying on the work of God, who have themselves neither part nor lot in the matter. (3.) While we are enabled to trust all our concerns with God, he has the hearts of the greatest in his power, and will over-rule them for the purposes of his own glory. (4.) If kings knew the efficacy of the prayers of God's people, they would be careful to secure an interest in them. (5.) Those whom God has set in authority over us, we are bound to pray for, though heathens or oppressors; and how much more, when truly defenders of the faith, and really nursing fathers to the church! (6.) The curse denounced will surely fall on all the enemies of God's spiritual temple. They who fight against that, destroy their own souls.

2nd, When the obstacles were removed, and the encouragements to labour so many, the work went on briskly. We have here,

1. The finishing of the temple. The governors dared no longer obstruct the work; but, though it may be with reluctance, were immediately obliged to comply with the king's orders; while the prophets Haggai and Zechariah pleaded those mercies which they enjoyed as an argument of God's blessing, and an obligation diligently to improve them; so that in four years the temple was completely finished. Note; (1.) Every mercy that we enjoy should be improved, as an argument for increasing diligence in God's service. (2.) The grand means which God makes use of for the perfecting of the saints, is the ministry of the word.

2. The solemn dedication of it. The priests and Levites, being set in their several courses, according to the law of Moses, offered liberal sacrifices to God on the occasion. As there were many, not only of Benjamin and Judah, but of other tribes joined with them, a sin-offering of twelve he-goats was offered for the congregation; and now, having through the blood of atonement obtained reconciliation, though some marks of bondage still continued upon them, yet with great gladness they rejoiced to see the long discontinued temple-worship once more happily revived. Note; (1.) The great concern of the returning sinner is, to obtain remission of sin. (2.) When the atoning blood is sprinkled on the conscience, the soul is filled with peace and joy in believing. (3.) Revivals of God's blessed worship and service are the heart-felt rejoicing of every faithful Israelite.

3. The next month they kept the passover with great solemnity and exactness; as a memorial of their escape from Egypt, and now of their repeated deliverance from Babylon, the second house of their bondage. The priests and Levites, unanimous to purify themselves, to a man were ready for their functions, and killed the passover for their brethren, as well as themselves. Not only the people who had returned from Babylon, but many proselytes from the heathen, who had renounced their idolatry, and were circumcised, joined with them; and seven days with universal gladness they kept the feast of unleavened bread; God comforting their hearts, and making them happy in the protection and encouragement which they received from the king. Note; (1.) All true converts to Christ fail not to feed upon him in the feast that he has instituted in memory of the deliverance wrought for them by his dying love. (2.) Purity in the ministers of God's ordinances is most conducive to the comfort and profiting of them: under such ministrations a blessing may be expected. (3.) When we draw near to God, we are called to put off all filthiness and superfluity of naughtiness; to separate ourselves from the ways of a wicked world; to renounce our former company, and join ourselves to God's people. (4.) Those who wait upon God in his ways, he causes to rejoice: He is the well-spring of all spiritual comfort, and out of his fulness we shall receive. (5.) When God becomes our portion, he can make those whom we feared as enemies our fast friends.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Ezra 6:22". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/ezra-6.html. 1801-1803.

Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary

REFLECTIONS

AT length we have seen, after many years expectation to the people, and much opposition from their enemies, the temple built and dedicated; and once more the church enjoying unmolested the privilege of her ordinances. But while we bless God for thus watching over his people for good, and in his own good time doing good to Zion; let us look to him whom that temple, and whom every ordinance, points to, and in whom all have their meaning and completion. Yes! precious Jesus! I would desire grace to look unto thee; for on thee all the eyes of saints and angels are unceasingly fixed with delight. And well may a poor sinner therefore look with delight on thee, since but for thee, and thy great salvation, he must have been looking up in the misery of the damned forevermore. Help me, then, thou precious Lord, to contemplate thy beauties, thy glories, thy loveliness, in thyself; thy loveliness and suitableness to thy people. Surely thou art the Lord our righteousness. Thou art indeed the temple, the altar, the sacrifice, the High Priest, the offering, the Lamb of God, and the all-sufficient propitiation; the advocate, the intercessor of thy people. Angels are gazing on thee, thou peerless beauty! the spirits of just men made perfect have their eyes fixed on thee. Every redeemed soul now in glory among the ransomed in the Zion which is above, is looking on thee with love, with rapture, with unspeakable, undescribable delight! Lord Jesus! make me one of the blessed multitude, and keep my heart, my soul, mine eyes, forever and forever gazing on thee. And while on earth my poor feeble frame is on the stretch to see thee in everything, to bless thee for every mercy, and to enjoy thee in all; oh! let me live near thee, and to thee, and with thee, day by day in a life of faith, until at thy second coming faith shall be swallowed in sight, and my soul sit down at the fountain head of everlasting enjoyment, in the presence of God and the Lamb forevermore, Amen. Hallelujah.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Hawker, Robert, D.D. "Commentary on Ezra 6:22". "Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pmc/ezra-6.html. 1828.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

The heart of the king of Assyria, i.e. of the king of Persia, which was now king of Assyria also, or emperor of that vast and famous Assyrian empire; which was first subdued by the king of Babylon, who therefore is somewhere called the Assyrian; and for the same reason the Persian monarch is here so called emphatically, to note the great power and goodness of God in turning the hearts of these great monarchs, whose predecessors had been the chief persecutors and oppressors of God’s people.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Ezra 6:22". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/ezra-6.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

22.Turned the heart of the king of Assyria — The Persian monarch is here called king of Assyria, because he ruled over all the provinces that were comprised in the former Assyrian empire, and these provinces now constituted the greater part of the Persian empire. For the same or a similar reason, Cyrus is called in Ezra 5:13, and Artaxerxes in Nehemiah 13:6, king of Babylon, whereas they also like Darius, were kings of Persia. The king of Assyria may here be understood of both Cyrus and Darius, for they both took measures to strengthen their hands in the work of the house of God. Both being adherents of the comparatively pure monotheism of the ancient Persians, they had a natural sympathy for the religious system of the Jews. Compare notes on Ezra 1:2.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Ezra 6:22". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/ezra-6.html. 1874-1909.

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

Ezra 6:22. And kept the feast with joy: for the Lord had made them joyful Had given them both cause to rejoice, and hearts to rejoice. “It was now near twenty years,” says Henry, “since the foundation of this temple was laid, and it is probable that most of the old men, who then wept at the remembrance of the first temple, were dead by this time, so that now there were no tears mingled with their joys.” Those that are upon good grounds joyful, have therefore reason to be thankful, because it is God that makes them to rejoice. He is the fountain from whence all the streams of our joy flow. And turned the heart of the king of Assyria — Of the king of Persia, called the king of Assyria, as now reigning over all the kingdoms which were formerly under the power of the Assyrians; and to signify the great power and goodness of God in turning the hearts of these great monarchs, whose predecessors in empire and dominion, in these parts of the world, had formerly been the chief persecutors and oppressors of the people of God. Darius, as we have seen, was now on the throne, of whom Dr. Prideaux gives this character: “He was a prince of great wisdom, clemency, and justice; and has the honour to be recorded in holy writ for a favourer of God’s people, a restorer of his temple at Jerusalem, and a promoter of his worship therein. For all this God was pleased to make him his instrument; and with respect to this, I doubt not, it was, that he blessed him with a numerous issue, a long reign, and great prosperity.”

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on Ezra 6:22". Joseph Benson's Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/ezra-6.html. 1857.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Assyria. The successors of Cyrus now ruled over those countries, (Calmet) which had belonged to the most potent Assyrian and Chaldean monarchs; and therefore the titles are given to them indiscriminately. (Tirinus)

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Ezra 6:22". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/ezra-6.html. 1859.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

And kept the feast of unleavened bread seven days with joy: for the LORD had made them joyful, and turned the heart of the king of Assyria unto them, to strengthen their hands in the work of the house of God, the God of Israel.

Kept the feast ... with joy: for the Lord ... turned the heart of the king of Assyria unto them - i:e., king of the Persian empire, which now included the possessions, and had surpassed the glory, of Assyria as well as of Babylon and Media (D'Herbelot, 'Bibliotheque Orientale,' sub voce 'Noah'). The three great ancient empires were frequently viewed and spoken of as the same under different dynasties. The use of this title has been accounted for on a different ground-namely, that this chapter, along with the preceding five, was written by Haggai or Zechariah, who, in common with the older Jewish exiles, were accustomed to apply it to the kings that carried them captive (Hervey, 'Genealogy,' p. 318; see Introduction to Ezra).

The favourable disposition which Darius had evinced toward the Jews secured them peace and prosperity, and the privileges of their own religion during the rest of his reign. The religious joy that so remarkably characterized the celebration of this feast was testified by expressions of lively gratitude to God, whose overruling power and converting grace had produced so marvelous a change on the hearts of the mighty potentates, and disposed them, pagans though they were, to aid the cause and provide for the worship of the true God.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Ezra 6:22". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/ezra-6.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(22) And kept the feast.—The Mazzoth, or week of unleavened bread, was the symbol of entire separation from evil, to the service of that God whom on the Passover they accepted as their God. The special joy of this feast was the feeling that the Lord had “turned the heart of the king of Assyria.” The king of Persia is so called as a remembrancer of their oppression by his forerunners.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Ezra 6:22". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/ezra-6.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

And kept the feast of unleavened bread seven days with joy: for the LORD had made them joyful, and turned the heart of the king of Assyria unto them, to strengthen their hands in the work of the house of God, the God of Israel.
the feast
Exodus 12:15-20; 13:6,7; 2 Chronicles 30:21; 35:17; Matthew 26:17; 1 Corinthians 5:7,8
turned
7:27; Proverbs 16:7; 21:1; John 19:11
the king
Darius, as reigning over the country of Assyria, is here called "the king of Assyria."
6-12; 1:1; 2 Kings 23:29; 2 Chronicles 33:11; Zechariah 10:10,11 Reciprocal: Judges 7:11 - thine hands;  2 Chronicles 29:36 - Hezekiah rejoiced;  Ezra 6:16 - with joy;  Ezra 7:6 - according to;  Ezra 9:1 - have not separated;  Nehemiah 2:8 - the king;  Nehemiah 2:18 - So they strengthened;  Job 4:3 - and thou hast;  Jeremiah 30:19 - out;  Jeremiah 31:13 - for;  Jeremiah 33:11 - the voice of them;  Ezekiel 23:23 - the Assyrians

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Ezra 6:22". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/ezra-6.html.