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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Galatians 1:7

which is really not another; only there are some who are disturbing you and want to distort the gospel of Christ.


Adam Clarke Commentary

Which is not another - It is called a gospel, but it differs most essentially from the authentic narratives published by the evangelists. It is not gospel, i.e. good tidings, for it loads you again with the burdens from which the genuine Gospel has disencumbered you. Instead of giving you peace, it troubles you; instead of being a useful supplement to the Gospel of Christ, it perverts that Gospel. You have gained nothing but loss and damage by the change.


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Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Galatians 1:7". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/galatians-1.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Which is not another - There is also a great variety of views in regard to the meaning of this expression. Tyndale translates it: “which is nothing else but there be some that trouble you.” Locke, “which is not owing to anything else but only this, that ye are troubled with a certain sort of people who would overturn the gospel of Christ.” But Rosenmuller, Koppe, Bloomfield, and others, give a different view; and according to them the sense is, “which, however, is not another gospel, nor indeed the gospel at all, or true,” etc. According to this, the design was to state, that what they taught had none of the elements or characteristics of the gospel. It was a different system, and one which taught an entirely different method of justification before God. It seems to me that this is the true sense of the passage, and that Paul means to teach them that the system, though it was called the gospel, was essentially different from that which he had taught, and which consisted in simple reliance on Christ for salvation. The system which they taught, was in fact the Mosaic system; the Jewish mode, depending on the rites and ceremonies of religion; and which, therefore, did not deserve to be called the gospel. It would lead them again with burdensome rites, and with cumbrous institutions, from which it was the great purpose of the gospel to relieve them.

But there be some that trouble you - Though this is most manifestly another system, and not the gospel at all, yet there are some persons who are capable of giving trouble and of unsettling your minds, by making it plausible. They pretend that they have come direct front the apostles at Jerusalem; that they have received their instructions from them, and that they preach the true gospel as they teach it. They pretend that Paul was called into the office of an apostle after them; that he had never seen the Lord Jesus; that he had derived his information only from others; and thus they are able to present a plausible argument, and to unsettle the minds of the Galatians.

And would pervert - That is, the tendency of their doctrine is wholly to turn away ( μεταστρέψαι metastrepsai), to destroy, or render useless the gospel of Christ. It would lead to the denial of the necessity of dependence on the merits of the Lord Jesus for salvation, and would substitute dependence on rites and ceremonies. This does not of necessity mean that such was the design of their teaching, for they might have been in the main honest; but that such was the tendency and result of their teaching. It would lead people to rely on the Mosaic rites for salvation.


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Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Galatians 1:7". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/galatians-1.html. 1870.

Coffman's Commentaries on the Bible

Which is not another gospel; only there are some that trouble you, and would pervert the gospel of Christ.

This verse should be read in close connection with the previous one. Regarding the exact meaning, Ramsay preferred as the simplest and best, "that which the English Revised Version (1885) gives in the margin,"[22] giving the thought thus: "A different gospel which is nothing else save that there are some that trouble you and would pervert the gospel of Christ." There is no hint in this passage that Paul actually considered Judaism "another gospel" in any genuine sense. See note regarding "Another Gospel" at end of this chapter.

A sample of the erroneous and irresponsible comment foisted upon this passage is the following:

(The false teaching) was surely a teaching according to which men are saved through faith plus law-works, a perversion of the true gospel which proclaims the glad tidings of salvation (by grace) through faith alone.[23]

Such a view is untrue, misleading, and anti-Scriptural. A New Testament writer flatly declared that people are not justified "by faith alone" (James 2:24); and no scholar has a right to contradict the New Testament. Note the expression "law-works," used to make it appear that Paul belittled the Christian ordinances; but it is not Christian ordinances and commands which Paul was denouncing, but works of the Law of Moses. We have reason to be thankful for brilliant scholars like R. E. Howard who spoke out against the heresy that people attempted to import into this passage, saying:

The logical implication of justification by faith alone is antinomianism, against which Paul vehemently objected... His repeated warning that wrong living excluded men from God's kingdom should leave no doubt as to his attitude... The new faith provided the only adequate means for ethical conduct, rather than absolving men from that responsibility.[24]

Any person familiar with the meaning of ordinary words must know that salvation "by faith alone" means salvation without obeying the Christian ordinances, without holiness, without moral conduct, without respect for any Christian duty, without the church and without the new birth or anything else. Such is the meaning of the word "alone" or its equivalent "only." The only religious error ever known which rivals that of so-called salvation "by faith only" is the Christian Science proposition that there is no pain, sickness or death!

Them that trouble you... Vine stated that the word thus rendered by this verse means "subverting the souls of believers by evil doctrine."[25] The exact characteristics of the evil teaching going on among the Galatians were gleaned from this epistle by David Lipscomb thus:

It puts in bondage (Galatians 2:4), causes entanglement (Galatians 5:1), could not bring justification (Galatians 2:16), or freedom (Galatians 5:1); it made Christ of no profit (Galatians 5:2), and it made the death of Christ, which is the very essence of the gospel, a superfluous thing of no account (Galatians 2:2 1); and in addition to providing no blessing whatever, it puts men under a curse (Galatians 3:10); and all who accepted it fell from grace (Galatians 5:4)[26]

[22] William M. Ramsay, A Historical Commentary on St. Paul's Epistle to the Galatians (Grand Rapids, Michigan: Baker Book House, 1965), p. 264.

[23] William Hendriksen, op. cit., p. 40.

[24] R. E. Howard, op. cit., p. 23.

[25] W. E. Vine, op. cit., 4p. 157.

[26] David Lipscomb, A Commentary on the New Testament Epistles (Nashville: Gospel Advocate Company, Vol. III, p. 190.


Copyright Statement
James Burton Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.

Bibliography
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Galatians 1:7". "Coffman Commentaries on the Old and New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/galatians-1.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Eadie's Commentary on Galatians, Ephesians, Colossians and Philippians

Galatians 1:7. ῝ο οὐκ ἔστιν ἄλλο, εἰ μή—“which is not another, save that:” it is no new or additional gospel— οὐκ, the negative being emphatic,—there is only one gospel. The εὐαγγέλιον expressed after ἕτερον stands vaguely and imperfectly, as the Judaizers might so name their system, but the εὐαγγ. implied after ἄλλο is used in its strict and proper sense. The connection with the following clause is variously understood.

1. Schott, preceded by a-Lapide, connects εἰ μή with θαυμάζω, making the previous clause a parenthesis: “Miror vos tam cito deficere ad aliam doctrinam salutarem (quanquam haec alia salutaris nulla est) nisi nonnulli sint.” But such an utterance requires ἐθαύμαζον ἄν: “I should have wondered” that you fell away so soon, unless there had been some troubling you. The sentence also becomes disjointed, and would make the apostle give only a hypothetical statement of the cause of his surprise.

2. Some make the whole previous sentence the antecedent to , such as Calvin, Grotius, Winer, Rückert, Olshausen: Your defection to another gospel is nothing else but this, or has no other source but this, that some are troubling you. But why should the apostle, after the censure implied in the last verse, really lift it by throwing the entire blame on the Judaizers? It would be to blame them in one breath, and make an apology for them in the next; and to refer καλέσαντος to Paul himself, as Gwynne does, does not remove the difficulty.

3. Others, again-and this has been the prevailing opinion-take εὐαγγέλιον as the antecedent: “which is no other gospel, because indeed there can be no other.” So the Greek fathers, with Luther, Beza, Koppe, Borger, Usteri, De Wette, Hilgenfeld; the Peschito, אָידוֹא דלוֹאאִיתֶיה, “which does not exist;” and the Genevan, “seeing there is no other.” But it seems plain that ἕτερος and ἄλλος, occurring together, must be used with some distinctiveness, for the one sentence suddenly guards against a false interpretation of the other.

4. The antecedent is, as Meyer, Hofmann, Wieseler, and others suppose, ἕτερον εὐαγ.: which different kind of gospel is no additional or co-ordinate gospel. The apostle does not say, it is not gospel; but it is not a second or other gospel, which may take a parallel or even subordinate rank with his. And he adds,

εἰ μή—“save that.” By this phrase, not equivalent to ἀλλά, as Dr. Brown argues in support of his exegesis, an exception is indicated to a negative declaration preceding, and it signifies nisi, “unless,” “except,” even in Matthew 12:4, 1 Corinthians 7:17. Klotz-Devar. ii. p. 524; Herodotus, 4:94, ἄλλον θεὸν, εἰ μὴ; Xen. Cyrop. 2.2, 11, τί δ᾿ ἄλλο, εἰ μὴ; Aristoph. Eq. 615, τί δ᾿ ἄλλο εἰ μὴ; Poppo, Thucyd. vol. iii. P. 1, 216; Gayler, Partic. Neg. p. 97. The Vulgate has, quod non est aliud nisi. The meaning is, this gospel is another, only in so far as

τινές εἰσιν οἱ ταράσσοντες ὑμᾶς—“there are some who are troubling you.” In this participial phrase, as Winer says, the substantivized participle is a definite predicate to an indefinite subject. A. Buttmann, p. 254. The apostle says of the τινές, that it was their function or their characteristic to be disturbing the Galatian converts. Luke 18:9; Colossians 2:8. Bernhardy, p. 318. τινές neither marks insignificance, ἀνώνυμοι (Semler), nor infelices (Bengel), nor yet paucity, pauci duntaxat sunt (Winer). Though not named, they were well known, but the apostle would not further characterize them. An extraordinary interpretation of τινές is given by Wordsworth, who takes it as the predicate: “unless they who are troubling you are somebody,” persons of some importance. The exegesis is not sustained by any of the examples which he has adduced, for τινές in them is marked by its position as a predicate, and the use of τι is not to the point. Nor would the clause so misunderstood bring out any self-consistent meaning. The verb ταράσσω, used physically (John 5:7), signifies to put in fear or alarm (Matthew 2:3), then to disquiet (John 12:27), to perplex (Acts 15:24). The apostle adds of those disturbers, what their desire or purpose was:

καὶ θέλοντες μεταστρέψαι τὸ εὐαγγέλιον τοῦ χριστοῦ—“and desiring to subvert the gospel of Christ.” The verb μεταστρέφω is to change, to change into the opposite (Acts 2:20; James 4:9), or to change to the worse. Aristot. Rhet. 1.15, p. 60, ed. Bekker; Sept. 1 Samuel 10:8; Sirach 11:31. The genitive τοῦ χριστοῦ may either mean the gospel which is Christ's as proclaimed by Him, or that which has Him for its object. One might say that the former is preferable, as then the different gospel preached by the Judaizers would stand in contrast to that proclaimed by Christ Himself. Still there would in the latter exegesis be this contrast, that as the gospel preached by them was conformity to the Mosaic ritual, it was in antagonism to that gospel which has Christ for its theme, for by its perversion it would render “Christ of none effect.” Whatever would derogate from the sufficiency of Christ's gospel, or hamper its freeness, is a subversion of it, no matter what guise it may assume, or how insignificant the addition or subtraction may seem. Bengel's oft-quoted remark, Re ipsa non poterant, volebant tamen obnixe, is true in result. Yet they in their preaching revolutionized the gospel, and such is the apostle's charge against them.


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Bibliography
Eadie, John. "Commentary on Galatians 1:7". John Eadie's Commentary on Galatians, Ephesians, Philippians and Colossians. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jec/galatians-1.html.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Which is not another,.... It is no Gospel, no joyful sound, no good news, and glad tidings; the doctrine which attributes justification to the works of the law, or mixes grace and works in the business of salvation, which was the doctrine of these false teachers, is no Gospel; not truly so, however it may be called; nor does it bring any solid peace and joy to distressed minds. There is but one pure Gospel of the grace of God, and Christ, and his apostles; there is not one and another; there is but one faith, one doctrine and scheme of faith; the Gospel is single and uniform, all of a piece, has no yea and nay, or contradiction in it; this trumpet gives no uncertain sound, nor any dreadful, but a joyful one:

but there be some that trouble you; meaning the false apostles, whose names he does not think fit to mention, as being unworthy to be named, and to have their names transmitted to posterity. These troubled the churches with their doctrines and principles, by raising disputes and controversies among them, injecting doubts and scruples into their minds, which puzzled and confounded them, and made them uneasy, and which broke in upon that peace of soul which the Gospel brings and establishes; for no true solid peace is attained to, and enjoyed, but by the doctrine of justification by the righteousness of Christ, pardon by his blood, and atonement by his sacrifice, which the doctrine of justification by works, &c. tends to destroy.

And would pervert the Gospel of Christ; which has Christ for its author, subject, and preacher; and particularly the doctrine of justification by his righteousness, which they sought to change, to throw into a different shape and form, to adulterate by mixing it with the works of the law, and so, if possible, destroy it: to this they showed a good will, but were not able to effect, for the Gospel is an everlasting one; it is immovable, and so is that particular doctrine of it; it remains, and will remain in spite of opposition to it. Thus the apostle prudently lays the blame of the Galatians removing from the Gospel to another upon the false teachers, hoping he should be able to reclaim them by solid arguments, and gentle methods.


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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Galatians 1:7". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/galatians-1.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

4 Which is not another; but there be some that trouble you, and would f pervert the gospel of Christ.

(4) He warns them in time to remember that there are not many Gospels; and therefore whatever these false apostles pretend who had the Law, Moses, and the fathers in their mouths, yet these ones had indeed corrupted the true Gospel. And he himself, indeed, also the very angels themselves (and therefore much more these false apostles) ought to be held accursed, if they go about to change the least thing that may be in the Gospel that he delivered to them before.

(f) For there is nothing more contrary to faith or free justification, than justification by the Law or by deeds.


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Bibliography
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Galatians 1:7". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/galatians-1.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

another — A distinct Greek word from that in Galatians 1:6. Though I called it a gospel (Galatians 1:6), it is not really so. There is really but one Gospel, and no other gospel.

but — Translate, “Only that there are some that trouble you,” etc. (Galatians 5:10, Galatians 5:12). All I meant by the “different gospel” was nothing but a perversion by “some” of the one Gospel of Christ.

would pervertGreek, “wish to pervert”; they could not really pervert the Gospel, though they could pervert Gospel professors (compare Galatians 4:9, Galatians 4:17, Galatians 4:21; Galatians 6:12, Galatians 6:13; Colossians 2:18). Though acknowledging Christ, they insisted on circumcision and Jewish ordinances and professed to rest on the authority of other apostles, namely, Peter and James. But Paul recognizes no gospel, save the pure Gospel.


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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Galatians 1:7". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/galatians-1.html. 1871-8.

Martin Luther's Commentary on Galatians

Which is not another; but there be some that trouble you.
Here again the apostle excuses the Galatians, while he blames the false apostles for disturbing their consciences and for stealing them out of his hand. How angry he gets at these deceivers! He calls them troublemakers, seducers of poor consciences.

This passage adduces further evidence that the false apostles defamed Paul as an imperfect apostle and a weak and erroneous preacher. They condemn Paul, Paul condemns them. Such warfare of condemnation is always going on in the church. The papists and the fanatics hate us, condemn our doctrine, and want to kill us. We in turn hate and condemn their cursed doctrine. In the meanwhile the people are uncertain whom to follow and which way to turn, for it is not given to everybody to judge these matters. But the truth will win out. So much is certain, we persecute no man, neither does our doctrine trouble men. On the contrary, we have the testimony of many good men who thank God on their knees for the consolation that our doctrine has brought them. Like Paul, we are not to blame that the churches have trouble. The fault lies with the Anabaptists and other fanatics.

Every teacher of work-righteousness is a trouble-maker. Has it never occurred to you that the pope, cardinals, bishops, monks, and that the whole synagogue of Satan are trouble-makers? The truth is, they are worse than false apostles. The files apostles taught that in addition to faith in Christ the works of the Law of God were necessary unto salvation. But the papists omit faith altogether and teach self-devised traditions and works that are not commanded of God, indeed are contrary to the Word of God, and for these traditions they demand preferred attention and obedience.

Paul calls the false apostles troublers of the church because they taught circumcision and the keeping of the Law as needful unto salvation. They insisted that the Law must be observed in every detail. They were supporters in this contention by the Jews, with the result that those who were not firmly established in faith were easily persuaded that Paul was not a sincere teacher of God because he ignored the Law. The Jews were offended at the idea that the Law of God should be entirely ignored by Paul and that the Gentiles, former idol-worshippers, should gratuitously attain to the station of God's people without circumcision, without the penitentiary performance of the law, by grace alone through faith in Christ Jesus.

These criticisms were amplified by the false apostles. They accused Paul of designs to abolish the law of God and the Jewish dispensation, contrary to the law of God, contrary to their Jewish heritage, contrary to apostolic example, contrary to Paul's own example. They demanded that Paul be shunned as a blasphemer and a rebel, while they were to be heard as true teachers of the Gospel and authentic disciples of the apostles. Thus Paul stood defamed among the Galatians. He was forced to attack the false apostles. He did so without hesitation.

And would pervert the gospel of Christ.
To paraphrase this sentence: "These false apostles do not merely trouble you, they abolish Christ's Gospel. They act as if they were the only true Gospel-preachers. For all that they muddle Law and Gospel. As a result they pervert the Gospel. Either Christ must live and the Law perish, or the Law remains and Christ must perish; Christ and the Law cannot dwell side by side in the conscience. It is either grace or law. To muddle the two is to eliminate the Gospel of Christ entirely."

It seems a small matter to mingle the Law and Gospel, faith and works, but it creates more mischief than man's brain can conceive. To mix Law and Gospel not only clouds the knowledge of grace, it cuts out Christ altogether.

The words of Paul, "and would pervert the gospel of Christ," also indicate how arrogant these false apostles were. They were shameless boasters. Paul simply had to exalt his own ministry and Gospel.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website

Bibliography
Luther, Martin. "Commentary on Galatians 1:7". "Martin Luther's Commentary on Galatians". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mlg/galatians-1.html. Zondervan. Gand Rapids, MI. 1939.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

Which is not another (ο ουκ εστιν αλλοho ouk estin allo). It is no “gospel” (good news) at all, but a yoke of bondage to the law and the abolition of grace. There is but one gospel and that is of grace, not works. The relative οho (which) refers to ετερον ευαγγελιονheteron euaggelion (a different gospel) “taken as a single term and designating the erroneous teachings of the Judaizers” (Burton).

Only (ει μηei mē). Literally, “except,” that is, “Except in this sense,” “in that it is an attempt to pervert the one true gospel” (Lightfoot).

Who disturb you (οι ταρασσοντεςhoi tarassontes). The disturbers. This very verb ταρασσωtarassō is used in Acts 17:8 of the Jews in Thessalonica who “disturbed” the politarchs and the people about Paul.

Would pervert (τελοντες μεταστρεπσαιthelontes metastrepsai). “Wish to turn about,” change completely as in Acts 2:20; James 4:9. The very existence of the gospel of Christ was at stake.


Copyright Statement
The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)

Bibliography
Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on Galatians 1:7". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/galatians-1.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Vincent's Word Studies

Another ( ἄλλο )

A different gospel is not another gospel. There is but one gospel.

But ( εἰ μὴ )

Rev. only. As if he had said, “there is no other gospel, but there are some who trouble you with a different kind of teaching which they offer as a gospel.”

Some that trouble ( οἱ ταράσσοντες )

The article with the participle marks these persons as characteristically troublesome - the troublers. Comp. Luke 18:9, of those who were characteristically self-righteous. For trouble in the sense of disturbing faith and unsettling principle, see Galatians 5:10; Acts 15:24. Not necessarily, as Lightfoot, raising seditions.


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Bibliography
Vincent, Marvin R. DD. "Commentary on Galatians 1:7". "Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/vnt/galatians-1.html. Charles Schribner's Sons. New York, USA. 1887.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

Which is not another; but there be some that trouble you, and would pervert the gospel of Christ.

Which, indeed, is not properly another gospel. For what ye have now received is no gospel at all; it is not glad, but heavy, tidings, as setting your acceptance with God upon terms impossible to be performed.

But there are some that trouble you — The same word occurs, Acts 15:24.

And would — If they were able. Subvert or overthrow the gospel of Christ - The better to effect which, they suggest, that the other apostles, yea, and I myself, insist upon the observance of the law.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.

Bibliography
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Galatians 1:7". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/galatians-1.html. 1765.

Abbott's Illustrated New Testament

Which is not another; not another gospel, but only a perversion of the gospel, as is stated in the close of the verse. A similar mode of expression, or rather turn of thought, occurs in 2 Corinthians 11:4.

Galatians 1:8,9. The meaning is simply that it is utterly impossible that there should be another gospel; that is, another system of religious truth, inconsistent with what had been revealed to him.


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Bibliography
Abbott, John S. C. & Abbott, Jacob. "Commentary on Galatians 1:7". "Abbott's Illustrated New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ain/galatians-1.html. 1878.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

7.Which is not another thing (20) Some explain it thus, “though there is not another gospel;” as if it were a sort of correction of the Apostle’s language, to guard against the supposition that there were more gospels than one. So far as the explanation of the words is concerned, I take a more simple view of them; for he speaks contemptuously of the doctrine of the false apostles, as being nothing else than a mass of confusion and destruction. As if he had said, “What do those persons allege? On what grounds do they attack the doctrine which I have delivered? They merely trouble you, and subvert the gospel. They do nothing more.” But it amounts to the same meaning; for this, too, I acknowledge, is a correction of the language he had used about another gospel. He declares that it is not a gospel, but a mere disturbance. All I intended to say was, that, in my opinion, the word another means another thing. It resembles strongly the expression in common use, “this amounts to nothing, but that you wish to deceive.”

And wish to pervert. He charges them with the additional crime of doing an injury to Christ, by endeavoring to subvert his gospel. Subversion is an enormous crime. It is worse than corruption. And with good reason does he fasten on them this charge. When the glow of justification is ascribed to another, and a snare is laid for the consciences of men, the Savior no longer occupies his place, and the doctrine of the gospel is utterly ruined.

The gospel of Christ. To know what are the leading points of the gospel, is a matter of unceasing importance. When these are attacked, the gospel is destroyed. When he adds the words, of Christ, this may be explained in two ways; either that it has come from Christ as its author, or that it purely exhibits Christ. The apostle’s reason for employing that expression unquestionably was to describe the true and genuine gospel, which alone is worthy of the name.


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Bibliography
Calvin, John. "Commentary on Galatians 1:7". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/galatians-1.html. 1840-57.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

7 Which is not another; but there be some that trouble you, and would pervert the gospel of Christ.

Ver. 7. There be some] That would fain have blended Pharisaism and Christianity, Acts 15:5.

That trouble you] ταρασσοντες. As camels with their feet trouble the waters they should drink of.

And would pervert the gospel] They pretended only to bring in a Jewish rite or two, and yet are said to pervert the gospel, μεταστρεψαι. Ea quae post tergum sunt, in faciem convertere, as Jerome hath it, to turn that before that should be behind; to speak distorted things, διεστραμμενα, such as produce convulsions of conscience, Acts 20:30. A little thing untowardly mingled mars all. The monstrous heresy of Nestorius lay but in one letter, θεοδοχος, and of Arius, but in one syllable, ομοιουσιος.


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Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Galatians 1:7". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/galatians-1.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Galatians 1:7. Which is not another; I take the Greek here to signify, says Mr. Locke, which is not any thing else. For, first, the words themselves, the context, and the business the Apostle is upon, do all concur in this sense. Secondly, It is suitable to St. Paul's design here to tell them, that to their being removed to another Gospel, nobody else had contributed, but it was wholly owing to those Judaizing seducers. Dr. Heylin renders this and the preceding verse as follows: I wonder you have so soon deserted unto another Gospel from me, who called you by the grace of Christ; which comes only from this, that there are some who perplex your minds, and would subvert the Gospel of Christ.


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Bibliography
Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Galatians 1:7". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/galatians-1.html. 1801-1803.

Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary

7.] Meyer’s note appears to me well to express the sense: “the preceding εἰς ἕτερον εὐαγγέλιον was a paradoxical expression, there being in reality but one Gospel. Paul appeared by it to admit the existence of many Gospels, and he therefore now explains himself more accurately, how he wishes to be understood— ὃ οὐκ ἔστιν ἄλλο, εἰ μή &c.,” i.e. which “different Gospel,” whereto you are falling away, is not another, not a second, besides the one Gospel ( ἄλλο, not ἕτερον again; see above), except that there are some who trouble yon &c. That is: ‘This ἕτερον εὐαγγ. is only in so far another, that there are certain, who &c.’ Notice that the stress is on οὐκ; so that Paul, though he had before said εἰς ἕτερον εὐαγγ., yet guards the unity of the Gospel, and explains what he meant by ἕτερον εὐαγγέλιον to be nothing but a corruption and perversion of the one Gospel of Christ. Others, as Chrys., Œc., Thdrt., Luther, De Wette, &c., take ὃ οὐκ ἔστιν ἄλλο as all referring to εὐαγγέλιον, “which is (admits of being) no other” (= μὴ ὄντος ἄλλου): and then εἰ μή is merely adversative, ‘but,’ or ‘only,’ a meaning which it will hardly bear, but which, as De W. remarks, is not necessarily involved in his interpretation: ‘except that’ answering for it quite as well. The objection to his view is (1) that the meaning assigned to ὃ οὐκ ἔστιν ἄλλο is very harsh, taking the relative from its application to the concrete ( ἕτερον εὐαγγ.), and enlarging it to the abstract ( τὸ εὺαγγ. in general) (2) that the juxtaposition of ἕτερον and ἄλλο in one sentence seems to require, as in 1 Corinthians 15:40-41, that the strict meaning of each should he observed. Others again (Winer, Olsh., &c.) refer the to the whole sentence from ὅτι &c. to εὐαγγέλιον—‘which (viz. your falling away) is nothing else but (has no other cause, but that) &c.’ To this the objection (2) above applies, and it is besides very unlikely that St. Paul would thus have shifted all blame from the Galatians to their false teachers (‘hanc culpam non tam vobis imputo quam perturbatoribus illis,’ &c. Luther), and, as it were, wiped out the effect of his rebuke just after uttering it. Lastly, Schött., and Cornel.-a-Lapide, take ὃ οὐκ ἔστ. ἄλλο as a parenthesis, and refer εἰ μή to θαυμάζω, which should thus have been ἐθαύμαζον ( ἄν). This would besides make the sentence a very harsh and unnatural one. The nature of this ‘different Gospel,’ as gathered from the data in our Epistle, was (1), though recognizing Jesus as the Christ, it insisted on circumcision and the observance of the Mosaic ordinances as to times, &c.: (2) it professed to rest on the authority of some of the other Apostles see Chrys. quoted below.

οἱ ταρ.] The article points out in a more marked manner the (notorious) occupation of these men, q. d. ‘certain your disturbers, &c.’ Add to reff., Herodot. ix. 70, τὴν σκηνὴν τ. ΄αρδονίου οὗτοι ἔσαν οἱ διαρπάσαντες. Xen. An. ii. 4. 5, ὁ ἡγησόμενος οὐδεὶς ἔσται: and compare the common expression εἰσὶν οἱ λέγοντες.

τὸ εὐαγγ. τ. χρ.] perhaps here not ‘Christ’s Gospel,’ but the Gospel of (i.e. relating to, preaching) Christ. The context only can determine in such expressions whether the genitive is subjective or objective.


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Alford, Henry. "Commentary on Galatians 1:7". Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hac/galatians-1.html. 1863-1878.

Heinrich Meyer's Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament

Galatians 1:7. The expression just used, εἰς ἕτερον εὐαγγέλιον, was a paradoxical one, for in the true sense there is only one gospel: it seems to presuppose the existence of several εὐαγγέλια, but only serves to bring into clearer light the misleading efforts of the Judaists, and in this sense the apostle now explains it.

οὐκ ἔστιν ἄλλο, εἰ μή κ. τ. λ.] which ἕτερον εὐαγγέλιον, to which ye have fallen away, is not another, not a second gospel, alongside of that by means of which ye were called ( ἄλλο, not ἕτερον again), except there are certain persons who perplex you, etc. That is, this ἕτερον εὐαγγέλιον is not another by the side of the former, only there are certain persons who perplex you; so that in this respect only can we speak of ἕτερον εὐαγγέλιον as if it were an ἄλλο. So in substance Wieseler and Hofmann; comp. Matthias. It must be observed that the emphasis is laid first on οὐκ and then on ἄλλο; so that, although Paul has previously said εἰς ἕτερον εὐαγγέλιον, he yet guards the oneness of the gospel, and represents that to which he applied the words ἕτερον εὐαγγ. as only the corruption and perversion of the one (of the εὐαγγ. τοῦ καλέσαντος ὑμᾶς ἐν χάριτι χριστοῦ). Thus εἰ μή retains its general meaning nisi, without any need to assume (with Matthies) an abbreviation for εἰ μὴ ἄλλο ἐστὶ διὰ τοῦτο, ὅτι τινές εἰσιν οἱ ταράσσοντες κ. τ. λ.(18) The two emphatic words ἕτερον and ἄλλο preserve, however, their difference in sense: ἄλλο meaning absolutely another, that is, a second likewise existing (besides the one gospel); and ἕτερον one of another kind, different ( ἕτερον καὶ ἀνόμοιον Plat. Conv. p. 186 B). Dem. 911. 7; Soph. Phil. 501, O. C. 1446; Xen. Anab. vi. 4. 8 (and Krüger in loc.); Wisdom of Solomon 7:5; Judith 8:20. In the N.T., comp. especially 1 Corinthians 12:8-10; 1 Corinthians 15:40; 2 Corinthians 11:4; Acts 4:12; also 1 Corinthians 14:21; Romans 7:23; Mark 16:12; Luke 9:29. Comp. also the expression ἕτερον παρά τι, Stallbaum, ad Plat. Phaed. p. 71 A., Rep. p. 337 E. The interpretation most generally received (Peschito, Chrysostom, Oecumenius, Theodoret, Erasmus, Luther, Castalio, Beza, Wolf, Bengel, and many others; also Morus, Koppe, Borger, Flatt, Usteri, de Wette, Hilgenfeld) connects οὐκ ἔστιν ἄλλο merely with εὐαγγέλιον,(19) and for the most part understands εἰ μή adversatively, “Neque tamen est ulla alia doctrina de Jesu Christo vera; sunt vero homines,” etc., Koppe. Against this interpretation may be urged, first, the fact that ἕτερον previously had the chief emphasis laid on it, and is therefore quite unwarrantably excluded from the reference of the relative which follows; secondly, that Paul must have logically used some such expression as ΄ὴ ὄντος ἀλλοῦ; and lastly, that εἰ ΄ή never means anything else than nisi, not even in passages such as Galatians 2:16; Matthew 12:4 (see on this passage); Luke 4:26; 1 Corinthians 7:17; and Revelation 9:4; Revelation 21:27. Comp. Hom. Od. xii. 325 f., οὐδέ τις ἄλλος γίγνετʼ ἔπειτʼ ἀνέμων, εἰ μὴ εὐρός τε νότος τε, and the passages in Poppo, ad Thuc. III. 1, p. 216. Others, as Calvin, Grotius (not Calovius), Homberg, Winer, Rückert, Olshausen, refer to the whole contents of ὅτι οὓτω ταχέως εὐαγγέλιον, “quod quidem (sc. vos deficere a Christo) non est aliud, nisi, etc., the case is not otherwise than” (Winer). But by this interpretation the whole point of the relation, so Pauline in its character, which οὐκ ἔστιν ἄλλο bears to ἕτερον, is lost; and why should the more special explanation of the deficere a Christo be annexed in so emphatic a form, and not by a simple γάρ or the like? Lastly, Schott (so also Cornelius a Lapide) looks upon οὐκ ἔστιν ἄλλο as a parenthesis, and makes εἰ ΄ή τινες κ. τ. λ. depend on θαυ΄άζω κ. τ. λ.; so that that, which is expressed in the words θαυ΄άζω κ. τ. λ., by εἰ ΄ή τινες κ. τ. λ.limitibus circumscribatur proferenda defectionis causa, qua perpendenda illud θαυμάζειν vel minuatur vel tollatur.” This is incorrect, for logically Paul must have written ἐθαύμαζον ἄνεἰ μή τινες ἦσαν; and with what arbitrary artifice οὐκ ἔστιν ἄλλο is thus set aside and, as it were, abandoned, and yet the reference of the to the emphatic ἕτερον is assumed!

οἱ ταράσσοντες ὑ΄ᾶς] The participle with the article designates the τινές as those whose characteristic was the ταράσσειν of the Galatians, as persons who dealt in this, who were occupied with it. Comp. the very usual εἰσὶν οἱ λέγοντες; also Luke 18:9; Colossians 2:8. See generally Winer, p. 104 [E. T. 136]; Krüger, § 50. 4. 3; Fritzsche, Quaest. Luk. p. 18; Dissen, ad Dem. de Cor. p. 238. On ταράσσειν, in the sense of perplexing the faith and principles, comp. here and Galatians 5:10, especially Acts 15:24; Sirach 28:9.

καὶ θέλοντες ΄εταστρέψαι] “re ipsa non poterant, volebant tamen obnixe,” Bengel; “volunt … sed non valent,” Jerome. On the other hand, the ταράσσειν of the Galatians actually took place.

The article before ταρ. refers to θέλοντες as well. See Seidler, ad Eur. El. 429; Fritzsche, ad Matth. p. 52; Kühner, ad Xen. Mem. i. 1. 19.

μεταστρέψαι, to pervert, that is, to alter so that it acquires an entirely opposite nature. Comp. LXX. 1 Samuel 10:9; Sirach 11:31; Hom. Il. xv. 203; Dem. 1032. 1.

τὸ εὐαγγ. τοῦ χ.] see generally on Mark 1:1. The genitive is here not auctoris, but, as expressing the specific characteristic of the one only gospel in contradistinction to those who were perplexing the Galatians, objecti (concerning Christ). This is evident from Galatians 1:6, where ἐν χάριτι χριστοῦ indicates the contents of the gospel.


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Meyer, Heinrich. "Commentary on Galatians 1:7". Heinrich Meyer's Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hmc/galatians-1.html. 1832.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

Galatians 1:7. ‘O, which) This word relates to the Gospel, not to the words a different gospel.— οὐκ ἔστιν ἄλλο, is not another) ἄλλο [aliud] another differs from ἕτερον, [alterum] a second and different.(2) Paul not merely rejects that so-called Gospel, which the Galatians had allowed to be thrust upon them, but any other whatever.— τινές, some) unhappy persons, Galatians 1:8, ch. Galatians 5:10; Galatians 5:12.— ταράσσοντες, that trouble) ch. Galatians 5:10.— θέλοντες, wishing) They really were not able, but yet they were earnestly wishing to do it. Paul often glances at the Galatians and their seducers by this expression; ch. Galatians 4:9; Galatians 4:17; Galatians 4:21, Galatians 6:12-13. So Colossians 2:18.— μεταστρέψαι) הפך is frequently translated by this word.— τὸ εὐαγγέλιον τοῦ χριστοῦ, the Gospel of Christ.) Those, who troubled them, did not quite deny Jesus Christ; but Paul acknowledges nothing but the pure Gospel.


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Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on Galatians 1:7". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/galatians-1.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Which is not another; another doctrine it is, but another doctrine or glad tidings of salvation, or another gospel of Christ, it is not; for there is no other. In and by the new notions they bring they do but

trouble you, and pervert the true doctrine of the gospel; though they use the name of Christ, and of his gospel, they do it falsely; for by making the works of the law, and the observance of them, necessary to be by you observed in order to your salvation, they quite destroy and pervert the glad tidings of salvation; viz. that we are saved by Christ alone and faith in him, and by a righteousness without these works.


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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Galatians 1:7". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/galatians-1.html. 1685.

Cambridge Greek Testament for Schools and Colleges

7. ὃ οὐκ ἔστιν ἄλλο εἰ μὴ κ.τ.λ. εἰ μὴ = πλὴν ὅτι (Acts 20:23; Romans 14:14). Two interpretations are now possible:

[1] Perhaps “unto another gospel (I mean that promulgated by the older Apostles) which is not a different gospel (from mine, for they really agree with me), except in so far as there are some that … would pervert” etc. But this seems to read too much into the sentence.

[2] More probably “unto a different gospel; which is nothing else save that there are some that … would pervert” etc. (so American Revisers’ marg., Ramsay, Winer-Schmiedel, § 26. 6 d). For ἄλλο εἰ μὴ cf. Herod, I. 200 οὐδὲν ἄλλο σιτέονται, εἰ μὴ ἰχθῦς μοῦνον. They are proclaiming another gospel which pretends to be more, but really they are only troubling you and wishing to overthrow the true.

τινές εἰσιν κ.τ.λ. St Paul here gives his opinion of their action, in (a) its primary effect, the disturbance of the proper attitude of the Galatian Christians, and (b) its purpose.

ταράσσοντες. Continuing the metaphor of μετατίθεσθε, i.e. raising seditions among you, cf. Galatians 5:10. So even Sirach 28:9 (Heb. not extant) ἀνὴρ ἁμαρτωλὸς ταράξει φίλους. In Acts 15:24 the Church at Jerusalem employs the same term with reference to the same controversy.

μεταστρέψαι. Elsewhere in the N.T. Acts 2:20; James 4:9 W.H. marg.[45], in each case of complete change into something of the opposite nature. So also here. Cf. Sirach 11:31 τὰ γὰρ ἀγαθὰ εἰς κακὰ μεταστρέφων.

τὸ εὐαγγέλιον τοῦ χριστοῦ. In itself the genitive may be subjective, the gospel preached and sent by Christ (so doubtless ὁ λόγος τοῦ χριστοῦ, Colossians 3:16, see note there); or objective, the gospel of Christ’s coming and work, as probably in 1 Thessalonians 3:2. But St Paul’s claim to preach the gospel that he had received from Christ Himself, Galatians 1:12, and his insistence upon its all-importance, suggest the former interpretation here.


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"Commentary on Galatians 1:7". "Cambridge Greek Testament for Schools and Colleges". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cgt/galatians-1.html. 1896.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

7. Not another—Paul, as it were, corrects himself. His last words, another gospel, might indicate that a return to Judaistic circumcision was a parallel gospel. He now denies that it is any gospel, or good news, at all. The word another, twice used in English here, is represented by two different Greek words. The former signifies different, the latter additional.

The former might mean that there are two gospels; but Paul adds that the supposed different is none.

But—It is a gospel, but only as a trouble you is a gospel.

Pervert—Literally, transform. They would substitute circumcision for the crucifixion as a mode of salvation.

Pervert the gospel of Christ—And make it become, essentially, the law of Moses again.


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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Galatians 1:7". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/galatians-1.html. 1874-1909.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

Galatians 1:7. Which (pseudo-gospel of the heretical teachers) is not another, i.e., no gospel at all, but a perversion and corruption of the one unchangeable gospel. The gospel of Paul teaches that man is justified by grace alone through faith in Jesus Christ; the pseudo-gospel of the Judaizers teaches that man is justified by grace and works through faith in Christ and the circumcision of Moses. The former makes good works the effect, the latter the cause, of justification; and this is thus in fact a relapse into the Jewish standpoint under a Christian name.

Save that there are some troubling you. Only in this sense is it another gospel that it is a perversion of the true gospel of Christ by those well-known troublers of your conscience.


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Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on Galatians 1:7". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/galatians-1.html. 1879-90.

The Expositor's Greek Testament

Galatians 1:7. οὐκ ἔστιν ἄλλο. The translation of this clause in A.V. and R.V. (which is not another) has caused great embarrassment by its apparent identification of the spurious Gospel with the true. Lightfoot pleads ingeniously that ἄλλο may mean another besides the true Gospel, and so interprets the clause to mean that it is no Gospel at all; but this will hardly be accepted by most other scholars. The American revisers suggest the rendering which is nothing else than. But these difficulties arise from making the subject of the sentence: surely it is in fact a connecting adverb (touching which, as to which, whereas), as it is again in Galatians 2:10, and probably in Galatians 2:20. If the clause be rendered, whereas there is no other Gospel (i.e., than the true), the sense becomes perfectly clear, and it forms an appropriate introduction to the succeeding anathemas by its emphatic testimony to the one true Gospel.— εἰ μή … This clause qualifies the former “there is no other Gospel,” only a spurious semblance (on the use of εἰ μή see note on Galatians 1:19).— τινές. There is a studied vagueness in this and other references to the agitators. They were evidently not Galatian Christians, but strangers from abroad, whom the Apostle treats with real or affected contempt.


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Nicol, W. Robertson, M.A., L.L.D. "Commentary on Galatians 1:7". The Expositor's Greek Testament. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/galatians-1.html. 1897-1910.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

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[BIBLIOGRAPHY]

In aliud Evangelium, quod non est aliud; Greek: eis eteron euaggelion, o ouk estin allo. Volunt convertere, Greek: metastrepsai, invertere, evertere, pervertere. St. John Chrysostom, Lat. edit. p. 812. E. ubi sunt igitur, qui nos ut contentiosos damnant, eo quod cum hæreticis habemus dissidium, dictitantque nullum esse discrimen inter nos & illos.... Audiant Paulum (p. 813. A.) illos subvertisse Evangelium, qui paululum quiddam rerum novarum invexerant. And in the Greek edition of Savil, p. 717, linea 3, Greek: pou nun eisin, &c. ....akouetosan ti phesin o Paulos, &c.

====================


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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Galatians 1:7". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/galatians-1.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

another. Greek. allos. App-124.

but. Greek. ei me.

some. Greek. tines, App-. Compare Galatians 2:12. 1 Corinthians 4:18. 2 Corinthians 3:1, 2 Corinthians 10:2.

trouble = are troubling. Compare Galatians 5:10. Acts 15:24.

and would = wishing to. Greek. thelo. App-102.

pervert. Greek. metastrepho. See Acts 2:20.


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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Galatians 1:7". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/galatians-1.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

Which is not another; but there be some that trouble you, and would pervert the gospel of Christ.

Another , [ allo (Greek #243)] - a distinct Greek word from that in Galatians 1:6. Though I called it a different gospel (Galatians 1:6), there are not many gospels: there is really but one, and no other.

But , [ ei-mee (Greek #1508)] - only that there are some that trouble you,' etc. (Galatians 5:10; Galatians 5:12.) All I meant by the 'different gospel' was nothing but a perversion by 'some' of the one Gospel. Would pervert - Greek, 'wish to pervert.' They could not really pervert the Gospel, though they could pervert Gospel professors (cf. Galatians 4:9; Galatians 4:17; Galatians 4:21; Galatians 6:12-13; Colossians 2:18). Though acknowledging Christ, they insisted on circumcision and Jewish ordinances, and professed to rest on the authority of other apostles. Paul recognizes none, except the pure Gospel.


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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Galatians 1:7". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/galatians-1.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(7) But there be some.—The force of the Greek, conjunction is, rather, except that, as the word “only” is used idiomatically in English. So far from being a second gospel, it is really no gospel, “only there are some . . . ,” i.e., the only sense in which there can be any mention of a second gospel is that there are some who pervert the old gospel. The existence of this party is the only excuse for the name. And it is a mere excuse. They do not deserve any such dignity. They really lay themselves under the curse of God.

That trouble you.—The Judaising party, with its restless factiousness and bigotry, causing schisms and divisions in the Church.

Pervert.—The Greek is even still stronger—reverse, or change to its very opposite. This they did by substituting a doctrine of righteousness by works—self-justification before God by performing the precepts of the Mosaic law—for the doctrine of reconciliation with God through the free forgiveness which He has promised to faith in Christ.

The gospel of Christ.—Where combinations of this kind occur, the question naturally suggests itself: What is the relation of the two words to each other? For instance, in the present case, is it “the gospel taught by Christ,” or the “gospel concerning Christ?” The following rule has been proposed:—In such phrases as the “gospel of salvation,” the “gospel of the kingdom,” the genitive is that of the object—“of” is equivalent to “concerning.” In the phrase “the gospel of God” it represents rather the cause or authorship: “the gospel of which God is the Author.” In the present phrase, “the gospel of Christ,” it may be either one or the other, according to the context. We must not, however, narrow too much the Apostle’s use of language. A somewhat vague and ambiguous term sometimes best expresses the fulness of his meaning. In English we might use the phrase “Christ’s gospel” to include at once “the gospel which proceeds from Christ,” and “the gospel which relates to Christ,” all, in fact, which makes it in any sense belong to Him and bear His name.


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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Galatians 1:7". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/galatians-1.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Which is not another; but there be some that trouble you, and would pervert the gospel of Christ.
but
2:4; 4:17; 5:10,12; 6:12,13,17; Acts 15:1-5,24; 20:30; Romans 16:17,18; 2 Corinthians 11:13
pervert
5:10,12; Jeremiah 23:26; Matthew 24:24; Acts 13:10; 15:1,24; 2 Corinthians 2:17; 4:2; 1 Timothy 4:1-3; 2 Timothy 2:18; 3:8,9; 4:3,4; Titus 1:10,11; 2 Peter 2:1-3; 1 John 2:18,19,26; 4:1; 2 John 1:7,10; Jude 1:4; Revelation 2:2,6,14,15,20; 12:9; Revelation 13:14; 19:20; 20:3

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Galatians 1:7". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/galatians-1.html.

The Bible Study New Testament

Actually, there is no. "There is no other message from God! I say it this way because some are claiming that God told them to turn you to the Law of Moses."


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Ice, Rhoderick D. "Commentary on Galatians 1:7". "The Bible Study New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ice/galatians-1.html. College Press, Joplin, MO. 1974.

Which is not another; but there be some that trouble you, and would pervert the gospel of Christ.

Paul seems to be confused - he says they are taken away to another gospel, but it is not another gospel. So, how is that? I think what he is saying here is that they thought they were called away from the gospel of grace to another gospel, a gospel of works. However, in truth there is no other gospel than the gospel of grace, so the gospel of works is not really a gospel.

If this is what he is saying, then apply that one to our society today. How many ways are there to heaven? One, through the gospel of grace, and you can label all other gospels as gospels not being gospels - all are false teaching, and false gospels.

He goes on to explain that the people that they are listening to are PERVERTING the gospel of Christ. Their gospel was not true - it was a perversion of the true gospel of Christ. The gospel of Christ is pure and simple, but these Judaizers were perverting that simple and pure gospel by adding requirements to what God had set for the ages before the foundation of the world.

Humm, does that seem a little arrogant to you - someone looking at the gospel that God set down before the foundation of the world and saying it isn"t quite good enough - I think we have to work a little for it as well - in essence, God isn"t able to define and institute a gospel that can save, but we - those that need to be saved - know what is lacking and we can supply it - I hope that sounds ludicrous to you for indeed it truly is ludicrous for man to be able to assist God in his own salvation.

These will "trouble" you - or cause commotion within, to disquiet, to strike with fear, or to render anxious or dreadful. This word describes well the emotions of one that has accepted the gospel of Christ, and has been given teaching that brings into question that simple and pure gospel.

One that questions their salvation, is often fearful of loosing their salvation, anxious about how they are living their life - afraid that they are disappointing God. In reality many brought up in the 50-60"s Bible belt environment were as described - fearful and anxious about their salvation and their life before God. Many questioned whether they were even saved, many thought they were total failures in their Christian lives.

The cure to all this fear was to stop listening to that inner voice that troubles you - that voice of doubt in the God that said He had saved you. He designed it, He instituted it, and He delivered it to you and you sit in your arrogance and question whether He did it right or not! Please, have confidence in the God that called you unto Himself for His own glory.

Please, also do not allow a mere man or mere book bring total upset to your soul when they try to add to the requirements that have already been met for your salvation - God did it all and no matter what someone tells you, HE DID IT ALL and YOU CAN DO NOTHING TO ASSIST HIM - NOTHING. He did it in the past and it is complete, so how in the world can you do anything to help in the completed process? You simply and unequivocally cannot.

The thought of the word "troubled" is the exact opposite of the term translated peace in the previous verses. They were taking away the peace that the Gospel can give to the soul. They were causing turmoil in the lives of the believers when they should have been enjoying peace and tranquility.


Copyright Statement
Copyright 2008. Used by Permission. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted in any form by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopy, recording or otherwise without the prior permission of the author, except as provided by U.S.A. copyright laws. Do feel free to make copies for friends that might be interested as long as you do not make profit from the copies. This is God's work and I don't want anyone to profit from it in a material way.

Bibliography
Derickson, Stanley. "Commentary on Galatians 1:7". "Stanley Derickson - Notes on Selected Books". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/sdn/galatians-1.html.

Lectionary Calendar
Sunday, November 29th, 2020
the First Week of Advent
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