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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Genesis 7:1

Then the Lord said to Noah, "Enter the ark, you and all your household, for you alone I have seen to be righteous before Me in this time.
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Antediluvians;   Ark;   Blessing;   Children;   Scofield Reference Index - Righteousness;   Thompson Chain Reference - Ark;   Bible Stories for Children;   Children;   Comes;   Divine;   Home;   Invitations, Divine;   Invitations-Warnings;   Noah;   Pleasant Sunday Afternoons;   Religion;   Stories for Children;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Judgments;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Seven;   Year;   Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Noah;   Righteousness;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Family Life and Relations;   Easton Bible Dictionary - Deluge;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Number;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Deep, the;   Family;   Household;   Remnant;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Deluge;   Family;   Hexateuch;   Time;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Generation;   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Baptism;   The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Noah;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Flood;  
Encyclopedias:
Condensed Biblical Cyclopedia - Sons of God;   Noah;   Priesthood, the;   International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Deluge of Noah, the;   Generation;   Pentateuch, the Samaritan;   The Jewish Encyclopedia - Right and Righteousness;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

Thee have I seen righteous - See the note on Genesis 6:8;

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Bibliographical Information
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Genesis 7:1". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/genesis-7.html. 1832.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

"And Jehovah! said unto Noah, Come thou and all thy house into the ark; for thee have I seen righteous before me in this generation."

It is stated in Genesis 7:4 that this event occurred a full week prior to the beginning of the Deluge; and it must be reckoned as a stupendous act of faith that Noah obeyed this injunction implicitly. It was one thing to build the ark, and quite another to enter it and live there a week without any sign whatever of the necessity for it. We are not told how his fellow mortals reacted to this, but human nature being what it is, it is a foregone certainty that such an action was met with all kinds of scornful mockery.

"Thee have I seen righteous before me ..." Noah's righteousness before God consisted of two things - his faith and his obedience. Noah had already been obeying God for a full 120 years while the ark was in preparation, his obedience consisting of his construction of the ark according to the pattern that God gave him, and his continual preaching to the wicked generation who were his contemporaries. Any effort to view Noah's "righteousness" as merely the existence of a subjective faith within himself should be resisted.

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Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
Bibliographical Information
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Genesis 7:1". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/genesis-7.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

- The Ark Was Entered

2. טהור ṭâhôr “clean, fit for food or sacrifice.”

4. יקוּם yeqûm “standing thing; what grows up, whether animal or plant.” Compare קמה qāmâh “stalk, or standing corn.”

Genesis 7:1-4

Here is found the command to enter the ark. The general direction in the preceding chapter was given many years ago, before the ark was commenced. Now, when it is completed, a more specific command is issued. “For thee have I seen righteous before me.” Noah has accepted the mercy of God, is therefore set right in point of law, and walks aright in point of practice. The Lord recognizes this indication of an adopted and renewed son. “In this age” he and his were the solitary family so characterized.

Genesis 7:2-3

Of all clean cattle. - Here the distinction of clean and unclean animals meets us without any previous notice. How it became known to Noah we are not informed. From the former direction it appears that the animals were to enter by pairs. Now it is further arranged that there are to be seven pairs of the clean cattle and fowl, and only one pair of the unclean.

Genesis 7:4

Seven days after the issue of the command the rain is to commence, and continue for forty days and nights without ceasing. “Every standing thing” means every plant and animal on the land.

Genesis 7:5-9

The execution of the command is recorded and fully particularized with the additional circumstance of the age of Noah. “The son of six hundred years,” in his six hundredth year. “Went they unto Noah.” They seem to have come under the influence of a special instinct, so that Noah did not require to gather them. Seven days were employed in receiving them, and storing provisions for them.

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Genesis 7:1". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/genesis-7.html. 1870.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

1.And the Lord said unto Noah. I have no doubt that Noah was confirmed, as he certainly needed to be, by oracles frequently repeated. He had already sustained, during one hundred years, the greatest and most furious assaults; and the invincible combatant had achieved memorable victories; but the most severe contest of all was, to bid farewell to the world, to renounce society and to bury himself in the ark. The face of the earth was, at that time, lovely; and Moses intimates that it was the season in which the herbs shoot forth and the trees begin to flourish. Winter, which binds the joy of sky and earth in sharp and rugged frost, has now passed away; and the Lord has chosen the moment for destroying the world, in the very season of spring. For Moses states that the commencement of the deluge was in the second month. I know, however, that different opinions prevail on this subject; for there are three who begin the year from the autumnal equinox; but that mode of reckoning the year is more approved, which makes it commence in the month of March. However this might be, it was no light trial for Noah to leave of his own accord, the life to which he had been accustomed during six hundred years, and to seek a new mode of life in the abyss of death. He is commanded to forsake the world, that he may live in a sepulcher which he had been labouriously digging for himself through more than a hundred years. Why was this? Because, in a little while, the earth was to be submerged in a deluge of waters. Yet nothing of the kind is apparent: all indulge in feasts, celebrate nuptials, build sumptuous houses; in short, everywhere, daintiness and luxury prevail; as Christ himself testifies, that that age was intoxicated with its own pleasures, (Luke 17:26.) Wherefore, it was not without reason, that the Lord encouraged and fortified the mind of his servant afresh, by the renewal of the promise, lest he should faint; as if he would says ‘Hitherto thou hast labored with fortitude amid so many causes of offense; but now the case especially demands that thou shouldst take courage, in order to reap the fruit of thy labor: do not, however, wait till the waters burst forth on every side from the opened veins of the earth, and till the higher waters of heaven, with opposing violence, rush from their opened cataracts; but while everything is yet tranquil, enter into the ark, and there remain till the seventh day, then suddenly shall the deluge arise.’ And although oracles are not now brought down from heaven, let us know that continual meditation on the word is not ineffectual; for as new difficulties perpetually arise before us, so God, by one and another promise, establishes our faith, so that our strength being renewed, we may at length arrive at the goal. Our duty, indeed, is, attentively to hear God speaking to us; and neither through depraved fastidiousness, to reject those exercises, by which He cherishes, or excites, or confirms our faith, according as he knows it to be still tender, or languishing, or weak; nor yet to reject them as superfluous. For thee have I seen righteous. When the Lord assigns as his reason for preserving Noah, that he knew him to be righteous, he seems to attribute the praise of salvation to the merit of works; for if Noah was saved because he was righteous, it follows, that we shall deserve life by good works. But here it behaves us cautiously to weigh the design of God; which was to place one man in contrast with the whole world, in order that, in his person, he might condemn the unrighteousness of all men. For he again testifies, that the punishment which he was about to inflict on the world was just, seeing that only one man was left who then cultivated righteousness, for whose sake he was propitious to his whole family. Should any one object, that from this passage, God is proved to have respect to works in saving men, the solution is ready; that this is not repugnant to gratuitous acceptance, since God accepts those gifts which he himself has conferred upon his servants. We must observe, in the first place, that he loves men freely, inasmuch as he finds nothing in them but what is worthy of hatred, since all men are born the children of wrath, and heirs of eternal malediction. In this respect he adopts them to himself in Christ, and justifies them by his mere mercy. After he has, in this manner, reconciled them unto himself, he also regenerates them, by his Spirit, to new life and righteousness. Hence flow good works, which must of necessity be pleasing to God himself. Thus he not only loves the faithful but also their works. We must again observe, that since some fault always adheres to our works, it is not possible that they can be approved, except as a matter of indulgence. The grace, therefore, of Christ, and not their own dignity or merit, is that which gives worth to our works. Nevertheless, we do not deny that they come into the account before God: as he here acknowledges and accepts the righteousness of Noah which had proceeded from his own grace; and in this manner (as Augustine speaks) he will crown his own gifts. We nay further notice the expression, “I have seen thee righteous before me;” by which words, he not only annihilates all that hypocritical righteousness which is destitute of interior sanctity of heart, but vindicates his own authority; as if he would declare, that he alone is a competent judge to estimate righteousness. The clause, in this generation, is added, as I have said, for the sake of amplification; for so desperate was the depravity of that age, that it was regarded as a prodigy, that Noah should be free from the common infection.

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These files are public domain.
Bibliographical Information
Calvin, John. "Commentary on Genesis 7:1". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/genesis-7.html. 1840-57.

Chuck Smith Bible Commentary

Chapter7

And so the LORD said unto Noah, Come thou and all of your house into the ark; for thee have I seen righteous before me in this generation. Now of the clean beast thou shalt take by sevens, male with his female ( Genesis 7:1-2 ):

So seven pair of the clean beasts.

and of beasts that are not clean by two, the male and his female. Of the fowls of the air by sevens, the male and the female; to keep the seed alive upon the face of all the earth. For in seven days, I will cause it to rain upon the earth for forty days and forty nights; and every living substance that I have made will I destroy from off the face of the earth. And Noah did according to all that the LORD commanded him. And Noah was six hundred years old when the flood of waters was upon the earth. And Noah went in, and his sons, and his wife, and his sons" wives with him, into the ark, because of the waters of the flood. And of the clean beasts, and the beasts that were not clean, and the fowls, and every thing that creeps upon the earth, There went in two and two unto Noah into the ark, the male and the female, as God had commanded Noah. And it came to pass after seven days, that the waters of the flood were upon the earth. In the six hundredth year of Noah"s life, in the second month, the seventeenth day of the month, the same day were all the fountains of the great deep broken up, and the windows of heaven were opened ( Genesis 7:2-11 ).

Now you remember back in the first chapter of Genesis there God set a space-the raqiya-the heavens separating the waters, which were above the heavens, and the waters which were upon the earth. These waters now condensed and fell to the earth. But with that, the great fountains of the deep being broken up, there were great upheavals, no doubt, upward thrust of mountain ranges.

It could be at this time that the Himalayas did rise out of the sea. As former mountain ranges collapsed into the sea, the pressure of the water as the body, the ocean bodies were moved. The pressure pushing downward upon the new ocean beds would thrust upwards mountain ranges and would create a whole violent change in the geographical surface of the earth. And I have no doubt but that there were many dramatic changes, as far as geography is concerned at the time of the flood, as mountain ranges would disappear, the great fountains of the deep broken up, the rain descending, the pressure of the new oceans and the changing of oceans, and so forth, would of course create great changes.

There used to be a vast ocean up in the area of middle northern America, up in the area of Salt Lake and they feel that that"s all that"s left of which of what was once a very vast ocean. You go over to the south rim of the Canyon there and you find at the eight thousand foot level fossil remains of sea fish, shells, mollusks and so forth, so that area was once covered by a vast ocean.

Dinosaurs lived around its edges. The Painted Desert is an interesting area to search for dinosaur artifacts. I have a very interesting vertebrae of a dinosaur from the Painted Desert there. And it"s very interesting to go and search for the remains of the dinosaurs that were once around the shores of the vast ocean that was up in that area or the vast sea, whichever the case may be. But there have been great cataclysmic changes; upward thrust, pressures by the water changing its beds and so forth.

And all testify to the truth, the biblical account of there one time being a great cataclysmic upheaval in which the fountains of the deep were opened. Changes of the ocean floors. Changes of mountain ranges. Upward thrust, other areas sinking and disappearing. It could be that the lost continent of Atlantis, that there is in reality a basis of fact that this did exist and they could have been eliminated by this great flood, by the whole change of the structures.

They have found in the middle Atlantic vast beds of sand. You only have sand on the seashore. It"s caused by the action of the movement of the water wearing down the rocks and so forth, the granite. Much of the sea is covered by silt through the centuries, just the silt settling down to the bottom of the ocean. But these great beds of sand are something they can"t explain out in the middle of the Atlantic showing that it was once a beach, a seashore. Why isn"t it covered by several feet of silt? How did it get there? All interesting things that the scientists have not yet figured out. But the flood with the changes of the surface of the earth would easily explain all of these things.

So "the great fountains of the deep were broken up, the windows of heaven were opened."

And the rain was upon the earth for forty days and forty nights. And in the selfsame day entered Noah, and Shem, and Ham, and Japheth, the sons of Noah, and Noah"s wife, and the three wives of his sons with them, into the ark; They, and every beast after his kind, and all the cattle after their kind, and every creeping thing that creepeth upon the earth after his kind, every fowl after his kind, every bird of every sort ( Genesis 7:12-14 ).

I only wish that he could have gotten those two fleas at that time.

And they went in unto Noah into the ark, two and two of all the flesh, wherein is the breath of life. And they that went in, went in male and female of all flesh, as God had commanded him: and the LORD shut him in. And the flood was for forty days upon the earth; and the waters increased, and bare up the ark, and it was lifted up above the earth. And the waters prevailed, and increased greatly upon the earth; and the ark went upon the face of the waters. And the waters prevailed exceedingly upon the earth; all the high hills, that were under the whole heaven, were covered. Fifteen cubits upward did the water prevail; and the mountains were covered ( Genesis 7:15-20 ).

Now there are some who try to make this a local flood. That it only happened in the Babylonian plain. Well then, why would God put Noah to the job of building such a big boat? Why didn"t He say, "Move out of this plain, Noah, over to the next mountain, you know, range and all and get into that valley over there cause this thing is going to get flooded"?

And how could the ark be deposited on Mount Ararat and how could the waters cover Mount Ararat fifteen feet above which is seventeen thousand feet high? How could the waters just be piled up in that one area without being dispersed around the face of the earth? So those who try to just make this a local flood have many problems. Why bring all the animals in? It would not at all be necessary if it were just a localized flood.

But evidence, of course, the Scripture declares it was a worldwide flood and evidence would seem to go along with the Scriptures on this. That is the whales being found here in Vermont, five hundred feet above sea level and the cavern in Maryland, and things of this nature with the various animals thrust in and broken up.

"The flood was forty days upon the earth; the waters increased, bare the ark, it was lifted up above the earth. The waters prevailed, and were increased greatly upon the earth; the ark went upon the face of the waters. And the waters prevailed exceedingly upon the earth; all the high hills, that were under the whole heaven, were covered. Fifteen cubits upward did the waters prevail; and the mountains were covered." That is, fifteen feet above the highest mountain.

And all flesh died that moved upon the earth, both of fowl, and cattle, and beast, and every creeping thing that creepeth upon the earth, and every man: All in whose nostrils was the breath of life, of all that was in the dry land, died. And every living substance was destroyed which was upon the face of the ground, both man, and cattle, creeping things, the fowl of heaven; they were destroyed from the earth: and Noah only remained alive, and they that were with him in the ark. And the waters prevailed upon the earth for a hundred and fifty days ( Genesis 7:21-24 ).

Almost a half a year the waters prevailed upon the earth, during this time of great cataclysmic upheaval. Now Jesus, when talking to His disciples about the signs of His coming and the end of the world said, "as it was in the days of Noah, so shall the coming of the Son of man be" ( Matthew 24:37 ).

The days of Noah were days of rapid population explosion. "It came to pass in those days, when men began to multiply upon the face of the earth" ( Genesis 6:1 ), population explosion during Noah"s day. The days of Noah were days of abnormal sexual behavior. "The sons of God seeing the daughters of men." Jesus says that they were days in which marriage vows were cast aside and men were marrying and giving in marriage, or live-in type of relationships, not honoring the marriage vows, casting them aside.

The days of Noah were days of wickedness, man"s mind being evil continually. They were days of corruption and they were days of violence. As it was in the days of Noah, so it is today. Noah was to be a sign of the coming of Jesus Christ. I believe that Noah also gives to us another sign of sorts, for Noah was upon the earth at the time of God"s great judgment of the earth because of the wickedness. And God is going to again judge the earth because of wickedness. But I do not believe that Noah is the type of the church that God preserves during His period of judgment.

There is a group that God is going to preserve during the period of coming judgment that will be sheltered by God, these are the144,000, the Israelites who will be sealed by God and be sheltered from many of the judgments of God that are coming. That seal upon their forehead, the name of God upon their forehead will be, as it were an ark.

But I believe that Enoch is a type of the church who walked with God and was not for God took him. But before God took him he had this testimony that he pleased God and Enoch was taken up before the flood, before the judgment of God, being a type of the church. And Noah, the type of the144,000 Israelites that are sealed, is protected by God and taken through the judgment of God that is coming upon the earth, even as the144,000 will be protected and taken through.

The interesting thing to me is that God placed Noah in the ark and He shut the door. The Bible says that Noah was a preacher of righteousness. He was preaching to these people during the hundred-year period that he was building the ark, warning them of God"s impending judgment that was to come. But the people no doubt scoffed at Noah and laughed at his warnings and mocked the crazy old coot building a big boat out in the area where there is no water.

But Noah by faith built the boat to the saving of his family. It brought salvation because he obeyed God and God shut him in. At that point, the die was cast; Noah, his family, safe inside. The others, on the outside; it"s too late. That marked an interesting day between the mercy and the grace and the patience of God and now the necessary judgment. For God said, "My spirit shall not always strive with man."

God"s spirit does strive with man. That in itself is a miracle and a marvel. Why should God strive with me? Who am I that God should strive with me? Who are you that God should strive with you? What a miracle of grace that God would even strive with man! What a marvelous demonstration of His condescension and of His love and of His concern that God would even bother to strive with man.

But what an awesome and solemn warning. God"s spirit won"t always strive with you. In Hebrews we read of those "who have done despite to the spirit of grace. Who have counted the blood of the covenant wherewith Jesus was sanctified an unholy thing. Done despite to the spirit of grace." And there remains for them that "certain looking forward to the fiery indignation of the wrath of God by which His enemies shall be devoured. For if he who despised Moses" law perished in the mouth of two or three witnesses: how much sorer punishment, suppose ye, he should be counted worthy, who hath trodden under foot the Son of God, counted the blood of his covenant an unholy thing, done despite to that Spirit of grace" that"s been dealing with his heart ( Hebrews 10:27-29 ).

"God"s spirit will not always strive with man." There is a time we know not when, a line we know not where; that marks the destiny of men twixt sorrow and despair. There is a line though by man unseen, once it has been crossed, even God Himself in all His love has sworn that all is lost.

It"s possible for you to say "no" once too many times. It"s possible for you to do despite to the spirit of grace. It"s possible for you to cross that line between the grace and the mercy and the patience and the long-suffering of God, and the judgment of God. There came that day when Noah went in and God shut him in. What a glorious day when God shuts us in to himself, to that ark of refuge that He has provided for us through Jesus Christ, and I become a part of His beautiful kingdom through faith.

May God by His Holy Spirit speak to each of us as we continue our journey through Genesis.

Father, we thank You for the privilege of studying Your Word together, looking over these interesting things. Thank You for the record, Lord, that leads us to Jesus Christ and to eternal life in Him. Lord, let Thy Holy Spirit now implant upon our hearts Thy truths. In Jesus" name, Amen. "

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Copyright © 2014, Calvary Chapel of Costa Mesa, Ca.
Bibliographical Information
Smith, Charles Ward. "Commentary on Genesis 7:1". "Chuck Smith Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/csc/genesis-7.html. 2014.

Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable

God graciously invited Noah to enter the ark with his family ( Genesis 7:1). This is the first occurrence of the offer "come" in the Bible. This invitation continues throughout Scripture, the last offer being in Revelation 22:17. God extends the invitation to people, He urges them to take advantage of the perfect provision He has made for their preservation, and He offers it in a time of impending judgment and gloom.

"It is not that Noah"s works of righteousness gains [sic] him salvation, for none is cited. Rather, his upright character is noted to condemn his generation, which merits death." [Note: Mathews, p371.]

"Sinful men do not deserve to live on God"s earth. This is the basic message of the Genesis Flood." [Note: John C. Whitcomb, Esther: The Triumph of God"s Sovereignty, p21.]

God did not reveal the basis for His distinction between clean and unclean animals here ( Genesis 7:2). Israel"s pagan neighbors also observed clean and unclean distinctions between animals though they varied from country to country. In the Mosaic Law, God further distinguished between foods. Jesus Christ and the Apostle Paul taught that now these distinctions no longer need affect people as far as our relationship to God goes ( Mark 7:15; Mark 7:18-19; cf. Acts 10:15; Acts 11:9; Romans 14:14).

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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Constable, Thomas. DD. "Commentary on Genesis 7:1". "Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dcc/genesis-7.html. 2012.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

And the Lord said unto Noah,.... After Noah had built the ark, and got all things ready as were commanded him; and when it was but seven days ere the flood would begin:

Come thou and all thy house into the ark; that is, he and his wife, his three sons and their wives:

for thee have I seen righteous before me in this generation: this was a great character of Noah; that he was a "righteous" person, not by his own righteousness, but by the righteousness of faith he was both heir and preacher of; and this he was "before" God, in his sight, seen, known, and acknowledged by him as righteous; and therefore must be really so: and this shows that he was not so by the works of the law, but by the righteousness of Christ; because by them no flesh living is justified in the sight of God: and Noah was a rare instance of this character; there was none besides him in that wicked generation, so that he was very conspicuous and remarkable; and it was wonderful grace to him, that he should have this blessing to be righteous in an age so sadly corrupt, which was the cause of his being saved; for whoever are justified shall be saved eternally, Romans 8:30 as well as they are often saved from temporal calamities, see Isaiah 3:10.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Genesis 7:1". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/genesis-7.html. 1999.

Matthew Henry's Complete Commentary on the Bible

Noah Invited into the Ark. B. C. 2349.

1And the LORD said unto Noah, Come thou and all thy house into the ark for thee have I seen righteous before me in this generation. 2Of every clean beast thou shalt take to thee by sevens, the male and his female: and of beasts that are not clean by two, the male and his female. 3Of fowls also of the air by sevens, the male and the female to keep seed alive upon the face of all the earth. 4For yet seven days, and I will cause it to rain upon the earth forty days and forty nights and every living substance that I have made will I destroy from off the face of the earth.

Here is, I. A gracious invitation of Noah and his family into a place of safety, now that the flood of waters was coming, Genesis 7:1.

1. The call itself is very kind, like that of a tender father to his children, to come in doors, when he sees night or a storm coming: Come thou, and all thy house, that small family that thou hast, into the ark. Observe, (1.) Noah did not go into the ark till God bade him though he knew it was designed for his place of refuge, yet he waited for a renewed command, and had it. It is very comfortable to follow the calls of Providence, and to see God going before us in every step we take. (2.) God does not bid him go into the ark, but come into it, implying that God would go with him, would lead him into it, accompany him in it, and in due time bring him safely out of it. Note, Wherever we are, it is very desirable to have the presence of God with us, for this is all in all to the comfort of every condition. It was this that made Noah's ark, which was a prison, to be to him not only a refuge, but a palace. (3.) Noah had taken a great deal of pains to build the ark, and now he was himself preserved alive in it. Note, What we do in obedience to the command of God, and in faith, we ourselves shall certainly have the comfort of, first or last. (4.) Not he only, but his house also, his wife and children, are called with him into the ark. Note, It is good to belong to the family of a godly man it is safe and comfortable to dwell under such a shadow. One of Noah's sons was Ham, who proved afterwards a bad man, yet he was saved in the ark, which intimates, [1.] That wicked children often fare the better for the sake of their godly parents. [2.] That there is a mixture of bad with good in the best societies on earth, and we are not to think it strange. In Noah's family there was a Ham, and in Christ's family there was a Judas. There is no perfect purity on this side heaven. (5.) This call to Noah was a type of the call which the gospel gives to poor sinners. Christ is an ark already prepared, in whom alone we can be safe when death and judgment come. Now the burden of the song is, "Come, come " the word says, "Come " ministers say, "Come " the Spirit says, "Come, come into the ark."

2. The reason for this invitation is a very honourable testimony to Noah's integrity: For thee have I seen righteous before me in this generation. Observe, (1.) Those are righteous indeed that are righteous before God, that have not only the form of godliness by which they appear righteous before men, who may easily be imposed upon, but the power of it by which they approve themselves to God, who searches the heart, and cannot be deceived in men's characters. (2.) God takes notice of and is pleased with those that are righteous before him: Thee have I seen. In a world of wicked people God could see one righteous Noah that single grain of wheat could not be lost, no, not in so great a heap of chaff. The Lord knows those that are his. (3.) God, that is a witness to, will shortly be a witness for, his people's integrity he that sees it will proclaim it before angels and men, to their immortal honour. Those that obtain mercy to be righteous shall obtain witness that they are righteous. (4.) God is, in a special manner, pleased with those that are good in bad times and places. Noah was therefore illustriously righteous, because he was so in that wicked and adulterous generation. (5.) Those that keep themselves pure in times of common iniquity God will keep safe in times of common calamity those that partake not with others in their sins shall not partake with them in their plagues those that are better than others are, even in this life, safer than others, and it is better with them.

II. Here are necessary orders given concerning the brute-creatures that were to be preserved alive with Noah in the ark, Genesis 7:2,3. They were not capable of receiving the warning and directions themselves, as man was, who herein is taught more than the beasts of the earth, and made wiser than the fowls of heaven--that he is endued with the power of foresight therefore man is charged with the care of them: being under his dominion, they must be under his protection and, though he could not secure every individual, yet he must carefully preserve every species, that no tribe, no, not the least considerable, might entirely perish out of the creation. Observe in this, 1. God's care for man, for his comfort and benefit. We do not find that Noah was solicitous of himself about this matter but God consults our happiness more than we do ourselves. Though God saw that the old world was very provoking, and foresaw that the new one would be little better, yet he would preserve the brute creatures for man's use. Doth God take care for oxen? 1 Corinthians 9:9. Or was it not rather for man's sake that this care was taken? 2. Even the unclean beasts, which were least valuable and profitable, were preserved alive in the ark for God's tender mercies are over all his works, and not over those only that are of most eminence and use. 3. Yet more of the clean were preserved than of the unclean. (1.) Because the clean were most for the service of man and therefore, in favour to him, more of them were preserved and are still propagated. Thanks be to God, there are not herds of lions as there are of oxen, nor flocks of tigers as there are of sheep. (2.) Because the clean were for sacrifice to God and therefore, in honour to him, more of them were preserved, three couple for breed, and the odd seventh for sacrifice, Genesis 8:20. God gives us six for one in earthly things, as in the distribution of the days of the week, that in spiritual things we should be all for him. What is devoted to God's honour, and used in his service, is particularly blessed and increased.

III. Here is notice given of the now imminent approach of the flood: Yet seven days, and I will cause it to rain, Genesis 7:4. 1. "It shall be seven days yet, before I do it." After the hundred and twenty years had expired, God grants them a reprieve of seven days longer, both to show how slow he is to anger and that punishing work is his strange work, and also to give them some further space for repentance: but all in vain these seven days were trifled away, after all the rest they continued secure and sensual until the day that the flood came. 2. "It shall be but seven days." While Noah told them of the judgment at a distance, they were tempted to put off their repentance, because the vision was for a great while to come but now he is ordered to tell them that it is at the door, that they have but one week more to turn them in, but one sabbath more to improve, to see if that will now, at last, awaken them to consider the things that belong to their peace, which otherwise will soon be hidden from their eyes. But it is common for those that have been careless of their souls during the years of their health, when they have looked upon death at a distance, to be as careless during the days, the seven days, of their sickness, when they see it approaching, their hearts being hardened by the deceitfulness of sin.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
Bibliographical Information
Henry, Matthew. "Complete Commentary on Genesis 7:1". "Matthew Henry Complete Commentary on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mhm/genesis-7.html. 1706.

Spurgeon's Verse Expositions of the Bible

Genesis 7:1. And the LORD said unto Noah, Come thou and all thy house into the ark;

Notice that the Lord did not say to Noah, “Go into the ark,” but “Come,” plainly implying that God was himself in the ark, waiting to receive Noah and his family into the big ship that was to be their place of refuge while all the other people on the face of the earth were drowned. The distinctive word of the gospel is a drawing word: “Come.” Jesus says, “Come unto me, all ye that labour and are heavy laden, and I will give you rest;” and he will say to his people at the last, “Come, ye blessed of my Father inherit the kingdom prepared for you from the foundation of the world.” “Depart” is the word of justice and judgment, but “Come” is the word of mercy and grace. “The Lord said unto Noah, Come thou and all thy house into the ark;” —

Genesis 7:1. For thee have I seen righteous before me in this generation.

Therefore God drew a distinction between him and the unrighteous, for he always hath a special regard for godly people.

Genesis 7:2-3. Of every clean beast thou shalt take to thee by sevens, the male and his female: and of beasts that are not clean by two, the male and his female. Of fowls also of the air by sevens the male and the female; to keep seed alive upon the face of all the earth.

Of the clean creatures which might be offered in sacrifice to God you see that there was a larger proportion than there was of the unclean, that there might be sufficient for sacrifice without the destruction of any species. The unclean beasts were mostly killers and devourers of others, and therefore their number we to be less than that of the clean species. Oh, that the day might soon come when there would be more of clean men and women than of unclean, when there would be fewer sinners than godly people in the world, though even then there would be the ungodly “by two” like the unclean beasts.

Genesis 7:4. For yet seven days, and I will cause it to rain upon the earth forty days and forty nights; and every living substance that I have made will I destroy from off the face of the earth.

It is the prerogative of the king to have the power of life and death, and it is the sole prerogative of the King of kings that — “He can create, and he can destroy.” But what destructive power is brought into operation because of human sin! Sin must be a very heinous thing, since God, who despiseth not the work of his own hands, will sooner break up the human race, and destroy every thing that liveth rather than that sin should continue to defile the earth. He has destroyed the earth once by water because of sin, and he will the second time destroy it by fire for the selfsame reason. Wherever sin is, God will hunt it; with barbed arrows will he shoot at it; he will cut it in pieces with his sharp two-edged sword, for he cannot endure sin. Oh, how foolish are they who harbour it in their own bosoms, for it will bring destruction to them if they keep it there!

Genesis 7:5. And Noah did according unto all that the LORD commanded him.

Here was positive proof of his righteousness, in that he was obedient to the word of the Lord. A man who does not obey God’s commands may talk about righteousness, even the righteousness which is of faith, but it is clear that he does not possess it, for faith works by love, and the righteousness which is by faith is proved by obedience to God. “Noah did according unto all that the Lord commanded him,” and so proved that he was righteous before God.

Genesis 7:6. And Noah was six hundred years old when the flood of waters was upon the earth.

He was nearly five hundred years old when he began to preach about the flood, — a good old age to take up such a subject. For a hundred and twenty years he pursued his theme, — three times as long as most men are ever able to preach, and now at last God’s time of long-suffering is over, and he proves the truthfulness of the testimony of his servant by sending the flood that Noah had foretold.

Genesis 7:7-8. And Noah went in, and his sons, and his wife, and his sons’ wives with him, into the ark, because of the waters of the flood. Of clean beasts, and of beasts that are not clean, and of fowls, and of every thing that creepeth upon the earth,

This largest and most complete menagerie that was ever gathered together was not collected by human skill; divine power alone could have accomplished such a task as that.

Genesis 7:9. There went in two and two unto Noah into the ark, the male and female, as God had commanded Noah.

They “went in.” Noah had not to hunt or search for them, but they came according to God’s plan and purpose, even as, concerning the salvation which is by Christ Jesus, his people shall be willing to come to him in the day of his power; with joyfulness shall they come into the ark of their salvation.

Genesis 7:10-11. And it came to pass after seven days, that the waters of the flood were upon the earth. In the six hundredth year of Noah’s life, in the second month, the seventeenth day of the month, the same day were all the fountains of the great deep broken up, and the windows of heaven were opened.

Perhaps the world was in its prime, when the trees were in bloom, and the birds were singing in their branches, and the flowers were blooming on the earth, “the same day were all the fountains of the great deep broken up, and the windows of heaven were opened.”

Genesis 7:12-13. And the rain was upon the earth forty day and forty nights. In the selfsame day entered Noah, and Shem, and Ham, and Japheth, the sons of Noah, and Noah’s wife, and the three wives of his sons with them, into the ark;

These eight persons are very carefully mentioned. “The Lord knoweth them that are his,” “and they shall be mine, saith the Lord of hosts, in that day when I make up” — or, shut up — “my jewels,” as he was about to do in the case. In similar fashion, God makes a very careful enumeration of all those who believe in him, precious are they in his sight, and they shall be preserved when all others are destroyed.

Genesis 7:14. They, and every beast after his kind, and all the cattle after their kind, and every creeping thing that creepeth upon the earth after his kind, and every fowl after his kind, every bird of every sort.

“Every bird of every sort,” that is, every kind of bird; they are all mentioned over again. God makes much of salvation, oh, that we also did! We may recount and rehearse the story of our rescue from universal destruction, and we need not be afraid or ashamed of repeating it. As the Holy Ghost repeats the words we have here, you and I may often tell out the story of our salvation, and dwell upon the minute particulars of it, for every item of it is full of instruction.

Genesis 7:15-16. And they went in unto Noah into the ark, two and two of all flesh, wherein is the breath of life. And they that went in, went in male and female of all flesh, as God had commanded him: and the LORD shut him in.

Now the jewels are all in, and therefore the casket is closed.

Genesis 7:17. And the flood was forty days upon the earth;

Just as it had been foretold, for God’s providence always tallies with his promises or with his threats. “Hath he said, and shall he not do it?”

Genesis 7:17. And the waters increased, and bare up the ark, and it was lift up above the earth.

You can see it begin to move until it is afloat. The same effect is often produced on us; when the flood of affliction is deep, then we begin to rise. Oh, how often have we been lifted up above the earth by the very force that threatened to drench and drown us! David said, “It is good for me that I have been afflicted,” and many another saint can say that he never was floated until the floods were out, but then he left the worldliness with which he had been satisfied before, and he began to rise to a higher level than he had previously attained.

Genesis 7:18-19. And the waters prevailed, and were increased greatly upon the earth; and the ark went upon the face of the waters. And the waters prevailed exceedingly upon the earth; and all the high hills, that were under the whole heaven, were covered.

If Moses had meant to describe a partial deluge upon only a small part of the earth, he used very misleading language; but if he meant to teach was that the deluge was universal, he used the very word which we might have expected that he would use. I should think that no person, merely by reading this chapter, would arrive at the conclusion that has been reached by some of our very learned men, — too learned to hold the simple truth. It looks as if the deluge must have been universal when we read that not only did the waters prevail exceedingly upon the earth, but that “all the high hills, that were under the whole heaven;” that is, all beneath the canopy of the sky, “were covered.” What could be more plain and clear than that?

Genesis 7:20-23. Fifteen cubits upward did the waters prevail; and the mountains were covered. And all flesh died that moved upon the earth, both of fowl, and of cattle, and of beast, and of every creeping thing that creepeth upon the earth, and every man: All in whose nostrils was the breath of life, of all that was in the dry land, died. And every living substance was destroyed which was upon the face of the ground, both man, and cattle, and the creeping things, and the fowl of the heaven; and they were destroyed from the earth: and Noah only remained alive, and they that were with him in the ark.

This is the counterpart of what will follow the preaching of the gospel those who are in Christ shall live, shall rise, and reign with him for ever but none of those who are outside of Christ shall so live. “Noah only remained alive, and they that were with him in the ark.”

Genesis 7:24. And the waters prevailed upon the earth an hundred and fifty days.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Spurgeon, Charle Haddon. "Commentary on Genesis 7:1". "Spurgeon's Verse Expositions of the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/spe/genesis-7.html. 2011.