Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Haggai 2:8

‘The silver is Mine and the gold is Mine,' declares the Lord of hosts.
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Church;   Thompson Chain Reference - Divine;   Gold;   Land;   Ownership, Divine;   Stewardship-Ownership;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Gold;   Riches;   Temple, the Second;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Haggai;   Zerubbabel or Zorobabel;   Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Joshua the son of jehozadak;   Zechariah, book of;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Church, the;   Prophet, Christ as;   Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Messiah;   Easton Bible Dictionary - Haggai, Book of;   Nativity of Christ;   Prophecy;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Haggai;   Jeshua;   Zerubbabel;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Desire of All Nations;   Haggai;   Minerals and Metals;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Haggai;   Priests and Levites;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Glory;   Gold;   New Jerusalem;   Thessalonians Epistles to the;   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Zerubbabel ;  
Encyclopedias:
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Desire of All Nations;   Haggai;   Joshua (3);   The Jewish Encyclopedia - Daniel, Book of;   Temple in Rabbinical Literature;  

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

The silver is Mine, and the gold is Mine - These words, which have occasioned some to think, that God, in speaking of the glory with which He should fill the house, meant our material riches, suggest the contrary. For silver was no ornament of the temple of Solomon. Everything was overlaid with gold. In the tabernacle there were bowls of silver, in Soloman‘s temple they and all were of gold 1 Kings 7:50; 2 Chronicles 4:8. Silver, we are expressly told, “was nothing accounted of 1 Kings 10:21 in the days of Solomon: he 1 Kings 10:27. made silver to be in Jerusalem as stones - for abundance.” Rather, as God says by the Psalmist Psalm 50:10-12, “Every beast of the forest is Mine, so are the cattle upon a thousand hills: I know all the fowls of the mountains, and the wild beasts of the field are Mine. If I were hungry, I would not tell thee: for the world is Mine and the fullness thereof:” so here He tells them, that for the glory of His house He needed not gold or silver: for all the wealth of the world is His. They had no ground “to grieve then, that they could not equal the magnificence of Solomon who had abundance of gold and silver.” All was God‘s. He would fill it with divine glory. The Desire of all nations, Christ, should come, and be a glory, to which all created glory is nothing.

“God says really and truly, that the silver and gold is His, which in utmost bounty He created, and in His most just government administers, so that, without His will and dominion, neither can the bad have gold and silver for the punishment of avarice, nor the good for the use of mercy. Its abundance does not inflate the good, nor its want crush them: but the bad, when bestowed, it blinds: when taken away, it tortures.”

“It is as if He would say, Think not the temple inglorious, because, may be, it will have no portion of gold or silver, and their splendor. I need not such things. How should I? “For Mine is the silver and Mine the gold, saith the Lord Almighty.” I seek rather true worshipers: with their brightness will I guild this temple. Let him come who hath right faith, is adorned by graces, gleams with love for Me, is pure in heart, poor in spirit, compassionate and good.” “These make the temple, i. e., the Church, glorious and renowned, being glorified by Christ. For they have learned to pray, Psalm 90:17. “The glory of the Lord our God be upon us.”

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Bibliographical Information
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Haggai 2:8". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/haggai-2.html. 1870.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

"The silver is mine, and the gold is mine, saith Jehovah of hosts."

This is apparently mentioned to indicate that:

"All nations with their wealth come (into Christ's kingdom) and the Gentiles shall bring their treasures, their powers, whatever they most prize, to the service of God ... All that, is here called metaphorically, coming with treasures to the Temple."[10]

This passage is "unmistakably Messianic. There could hardly be a more vivid picture of the covenant promise."[11] What is clearly prophesied here is that the "true riches of God (typified here as the silver and the gold) will make the house of God (the church) outshine the glory of Solomon's temple."[12]

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Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
Bibliographical Information
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Haggai 2:8". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/haggai-2.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

The silver is mine, and the gold is mine, saith the Lord of hosts. This seems designed to anticipate an objection taken from the gold and silver, with which the first temple was either decorated, or were in gifts dedicated to it; and which, it might easily be foreseen, would be wanting in the second temple; and in answer to which the Lord observes, that all the gold and silver in the world were his, were made by him, and were at his dispose; and therefore whatever were bestowed upon the former temple was only giving him his own; what he had a prior right to, and was no accession of riches or honour to him; and so it would be the same, let what would be expended on this; and therefore it was an article very inconsiderable, and of little significance; nor did he regard, or was he delighted with anything of this kind; and, was he so disposed, he could easily command all the gold and silver in the world together, and bring it into this house, to enrich and adorn it, without doing any injury to any person; but these were things he delighted not in; and, besides, he had a far greater glory in view to put upon this house, as follows:

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Haggai 2:8". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/haggai-2.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

The e silver [is] mine, and the gold [is] mine, saith the LORD of hosts.

(e) Therefore when his time comes he can make all the treasures of the world to serve his purpose: but the glory of this second Temple does not consist of material things, neither can it be built.
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Bibliographical Information
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Haggai 2:8". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/haggai-2.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

The silver is mine — (Job 41:11; Psalm 50:12). Ye are disappointed at the absence of these precious metals in the adorning of this temple, as compared with the first temple: If I pleased I could adorn this temple with them, but I will adorn it with a “glory” (Haggai 2:7, Haggai 2:9) far more precious; namely, with the presence of My divine Son in His veiled glory first, and at His second coming with His revealed glory, accompanied with outward adornment of gold and silver, of which the golden covering within and without put on by Herod is the type. Then shall the nations bring offerings of those precious metals which ye now miss so much (Isaiah 2:3; Isaiah 60:3, Isaiah 60:6, Isaiah 60:7; Ezekiel 43:2, Ezekiel 43:4, Ezekiel 43:5; Ezekiel 44:4). The heavenly Jerusalem shall be similarly adorned, but shall need “no temple” (Revelation 21:10-22). Compare 1 Corinthians 3:12, where gold and silver represent the most precious things (Zechariah 2:5). The inward glory of New Testament redemption far exceeds the outward glory of the Old Testament dispensation. So, in the case of the individual poor believer, God, if He pleased, could bestow gold and silver, but He bestows far better treasures, the possession of which might be endangered by that of the former (James 2:5).

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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Haggai 2:8". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/haggai-2.html. 1871-8.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

The silver is mine, and the gold is mine, saith the LORD of hosts.

The silver — The treasures of both: doubt not therefore but I will give enough to build this house.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
Bibliographical Information
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Haggai 2:8". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/haggai-2.html. 1765.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Haggai 2:8 The silver [is] mine, and the gold [is] mine, saith the LORD of hosts.

Ver. 8. The silver is mine, and the gold is mine, saith the Lord of hosts] Whereas the Jews might object that it was not likely the second temple should be more glorious than the first, since they wanted that wealth wherewith Solomon abounded; God answereth in like sort, as once he did Moses, alleging the slowness of his speech, "Who hath made man’s mouth?" Exodus 4:10-11, so here, whose is the silver and the gold? Am not I the true proprietor and chief Lord of all? cannot I furnish you out of my great purse, the earth, and the fulness thereof? Psalms 24:1 ( Terra est marsupium Domini). What is silver and gold but white and red earth, the guts and garbage of the earth, as one phraseth it? things that I have no need of, Psalms 50:13. They lie furthest from heaven; the best of them are in Ophir (perhaps the same with Peru), furthest from the Church. Adam had them in the first paradise, Genesis 2:11-12, in the second you shall not need them, Job 26:2-3, &c. In defect of other, I myself will be your gold, and you shall have plenty of silver, Job 22:25. Christ, girt about the paps (that seat of love) with a golden girdle, shall walk in the midst of his seven golden candlesticks, Revelation 1:12-13, with a golden censer in his hand, perfuming and presenting the prayers of his people upon the golden altar, Revelation 8:3, and measuring that city of pearl, his Church, with a golden reed, Revelation 21:15. Ribera and some others think that God, as of old he had stirred up Cyrus and Darius (both of them heathens) to contribute to the building of the temple, so afterwards he stirred up Herod, a wealthy king, not long before Christ came, to bestow abundance of cost upon the same temple; and that this was here afore prophesied. But I should rather incline to Calvin, who doubteth not but that the devil stirred up Herod to do as he did; that the Jews, doting upon the splendour of that brave structure (the disciples did no less, Matthew 24:1-2), might cease looking for Christ or trusting in him. And who knows (saith be) whether Herod himself might not have such a fetch in his head. Howsoever, the devil was in it, doubtless, to take off their minds from the expectation of Christ’s coming, which was now at hand, by those external pomps; and to withdraw the spirits of the godly from the furniture and gaiety of the spiritual temple. We know how the disciples (who, leavened with the leaven of the Pharisees, dreamt of an earthly kingdom) were taken with the beauty and bravery of Herod’s temple, showing the same to our Saviour, and fondly conceiting that by that goodly sight he might be moved to moderate the severity of that former sentence of his, "Behold, your house is left unto you desolate," Matthew 23:38; Matthew 24:1. But his thoughts were not as their thoughts. The bramble reckoned it a great matter to reign over the trees; so did not the vine and olive. The Papists hold that God is delighted with golden and silver vessels in the administration of the eucharist, and offended with the contrary. But the primitive Christians celebrated the sacrament of the Lord’s supper in vessels first of wood, and afterwards of glass. That saying also of Ambrose is well known, Aurum sacramenta non quaerunt, nec auro placent, quae auro non emuntur. It was grown to a proverb soon after Constantine’s time, Once we had golden ministers and wooden vessels, now we have wooden ministers and golden vessels. Religion brought forth wealth; and the mother devoured the daughter.

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Bibliographical Information
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Haggai 2:8". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/haggai-2.html. 1865-1868.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

The right as indisputable, the treasures of both as full and large, doubt not therefore but I will give enough to build this house; and I could beautify it with these as much as the first temple, but I intend a greater glory. I am the Proprietor, others but trustees; I have the full disposal of all.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Haggai 2:8". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/haggai-2.html. 1685.

Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable

This verse seems to support the view that impersonal wealth is in view in Haggai 2:7. The Lord reminded the people that He controlled all the silver and gold in the world, so He could cause the nations to bring it to the temple in the future.

"The point may well be that because all such things are His and are therefore not of value to Him, His own glory is what is central." [Note: Merrill, p41.]

This reminder would have encouraged Haggai"s contemporaries as they rebuilt the temple as well. God could bring more financial resources to them so they could glorify their presently modest temple.

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Constable, Thomas. DD. "Commentary on Haggai 2:8". "Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dcc/haggai-2.html. 2012.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Desired. Jacob styles him the expectation of nations, (Genesis xlix.) because He was wanting, and always necessary for all. (Worthington) --- Thus the sick desire a remedy, though they know not what it is. The Gentiles were ignorant of the Messias; yet he was still desirable and most lovely, Canticle of Canticles v. 16. (Calmet) --- Many also, like Job, had a lively expectation of their Redeemer's coming from the tradition of the patriarchs. (Haydock) --- Hebrew, "the desires of all nations shall come:" (Haydock) venient. Septuagint, "the chosen things," &c. Christ shall come for all, (Calmet) and the elect shall meet him with eagerness. (Haydock) --- In vain do the Jews attempt to contest this prediction. Was not the Messias to be desired? and has not Jesus Christ procured the greatest advantages for mankind?

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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Haggai 2:8". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/haggai-2.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

The silver, &c. Compare Isaiah 2:7; Isaiah 60:9-17; Isaiah 61:6.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Haggai 2:8". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/haggai-2.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

The silver is mine, and the gold is mine, saith the LORD of hosts.

The silver is mine, and the gold is mine, saith the Lord of hosts - (Job 41:11; Psalms 50:12). Ye are disappointed at the absence of these precious metals in the adorning of this temple as compared with the first temple. If I pleased I could adorn this temple with them, but I will adorn it with a "glory" (Haggai 2:7; Haggai 2:9) far more precious-namely, with the presence of my Divine Son in His vailed glory first, and at His second coming with His revealed glory (Zechariah 2:5), accompanied with outward adornment of gold and silver, of which the golden covering within and without, put on by Herod, is the type. Then shall the nations bring offerings of those precious metals which ye now miss so much (Isaiah 2:3; Isaiah 60:3; Isaiah 60:6-7; Ezekiel 43:2; Ezekiel 43:4-5; Ezekiel 44:4). The heavenly Jerusalem shall be similarly adorned, but shall need "no temple" (Revelation 21:10-22). Compare 1 Corinthians 3:12, where gold and silver represent the most precious things. The inward glory of the New Testament redemption far exceeds the outward glory of the Old Testament dispensation. So, in the case of the individual poor believer, God, if He pleased, could bestow gold and silver, but He bestows far better treasures, the possession of which might be endangered by that of the former (James 2:5).

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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Haggai 2:8". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/haggai-2.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(8) Silver . . . gold.—It is unnatural to suppose that this is said in the sense of Ps., as implying “I have no need of silver or gold.” Clearly what is meant is that the treasures of earth are at God’s disposal, and that He will incite the Gentiles to offer their silver and gold in His Temple. A rigid application of this prediction is impossible. (See Introduction, § 2.)

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Haggai 2:8". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/haggai-2.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

The silver is mine, and the gold is mine, saith the LORD of hosts.
1 Kings 6:20-35; 1 Chronicles 29:14-16; Psalms 24:1; 50:10-12; Isaiah 60:13,17
Reciprocal: Genesis 14:22 - the most;  Exodus 11:2 - borrow;  Exodus 38:24 - All the gold;  2 Chronicles 25:8 - The Lord;  Ezra 6:8 - the king's;  Job 42:10 - the Lord;  Matthew 21:3 - The Lord;  2 Corinthians 9:8 - God

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Haggai 2:8". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/haggai-2.html.