Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Haggai 2:9

‘The latter glory of this house will be greater than the former,' says the Lord of hosts, ‘and in this place I will give peace,' declares the Lord of hosts."
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Church;   Joy;   Peace;   Scofield Reference Index - Temples;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Prophecies Respecting Christ;   Temple, the Second;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Haggai;   Temple;   Zerubbabel or Zorobabel;   Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Joshua the son of jehozadak;   Zechariah, book of;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Church, the;   Prophet, Christ as;   Temple;   Worship;   Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Messiah;   Nativity of Christ;   Easton Bible Dictionary - Prophecy;   Temple, the Second;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Haggai;   Jeshua;   Messiah;   Temple;   Zerubbabel;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Haggai;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Peace;   Priests and Levites;   Providence;   Zerubbabel;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Glory;   New Jerusalem;   Thessalonians Epistles to the;   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Jerusalem ;   Tabernacle, the;   Temple, the;   Zerubbabel ;   The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Sign;   Temple;  
Encyclopedias:
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Haggai;   Joshua (3);   The Jewish Encyclopedia - Abendana, Jacob;   Daniel, Book of;   Humility;  
Devotionals:
Daily Light on the Daily Path - Devotion for November 19;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

And in this place will I give peace - שלום shalom a peace-offering, as well as peace itself; or Jesus Christ, who is called the Prince of peace, through whom peace is proclaimed between God and man, between man and his fellows; and through whom peace is established in the disconsolate soul. And at this temple this peace was first promulgated and proclaimed.

But it is said that the glory of this latter house shall be greater than of the former. Now this cannot be said because Jesus Christ made his personal appearance in that temple, or rather in that built by Herod; for, though we allow that Jesus Christ is equal with God, we do not grant that he is greater. Now the first temple was the dwelling-place of God: here he manifested his glory between the cherubim, and it was his constant residence for more than four hundred years. But the glory of this latter house was greater because under it the grand scheme of human salvation was exhibited, and the redemption price paid down for a lost world. As all probably applies to the Christian Church, the real house of God, its glory was most certainly greater than any glory which was ever possessed by that of the Jews. See on Haggai 2:22-23; (note).

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Bibliographical Information
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Haggai 2:9". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/haggai-2.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

The glory of this latter house shall be greater than of the former - or, perhaps, more probably, “the later glory of this house shall be greater than the former;” for he had already spoken of the present temple, as identical with that before the captivity. “Who is left among you that saw this house in her first glory, anti how do you see it now?” He had spoken of its “first glory.” Now he says, in contrast, its later glory should be greater than that of its most glorious times. In this case the question, whether the temple of tiered was a different material building from that of Zerubbabel, falls away.

In either case, the contrast is between two things, either the temple in that its former estate, and this its latter estate after the captivity, or the two temples of Solomon and Zerubbabel. There is no room for a third temple. God holds out no vain hopes. To comfort those distressed by the poverty of the house of God which they were building, God promises a glory to this house greater than before. A temple, erected, after this had lain waste above 1800 years, even if Antichrist were to come now and to erect a temple at Jerusalem, could be no fulfillment of this prophecy.

In material magnificence the temple of Solomon, built and adorned with all the treasures accumulated by David and enlarged by Solomon, far surpassed all which Herod, amid his attempts to give a material meaning to the prophecy, could do. His attempt shows how the eyes of the Jews were fixed on this prophecy, then when it was about to be fulfilled. While taking pains, through the gradualness of his rebuilding, to preserve the identity of the fabric, he lavished his wealth, to draw off their thoughts from the king, whom the Jews looked for, to himself. The friendship of the Romans who were lords of all, was to replace the “all nations,” of whom Haggai spoke; he pointed also to the length of peace, the possession of wealth, the greatness of revenues, the surpassing expenditure beyond those before. A small section of Erastians admitted these claims of the murderer of his sons.

The Jews generally were not diverted from looking on to Him who should come. Those five things, the absence whereof they felt, were connected with their atoning worhip or God‘s presence among them; “the ark with the mercy-seat and the cherubim, the Urim and Tummin, the fire from heaven, the Shechinah, the Holy Spirit.” Material magnificence could not replace spiritual glory. The explanations of the great Jewish authorities, that the second temple was superior to the first in structure (which was untrue) or in duration, were laid aside by Jews who had any other solution wherewith to satisfy themselves. “The Shechinah and the five precious things,” says one, “which, according to our wise of blessed memory, were in it, and not in the second house, raised and exalted it beyond compare.” Another says, “When Haggai saith, ‹greater shall be the glory of this later house than the first,‘ how is it; that the house which Zerubbabel built through the income which the king of Persia gave them was more glorious than the house which Solomon built? And though it is said that the building which Herod made, was exceeding beautiful and rich, we should not think that it was in its beauty like to the house which Solomon built. For what the wise of blessed memory have said of the beauty of the house of Herod is in relation to the house which Zerubbabel built. How much more, since Scripture saith not, ‹Great shall be the beauty or the wealth of this latter house above the first,‘ but the glory: and the glory is not the wealth or the beauty, or the largeness of the dimensions of the building, as they said in their interpretations, for the ‹glory‘ is in truth spoken of the glory of God, which filled the tabernacle, after it was set up, and of the glory of God which filled the house of God, which Solomon built, when he brought the ark into the holy of holies, which is the Divine cloud and the Light supreme, which came down thither in the eyes of all the people, and it is said, ‹And it was when the priests came out of the Italy place, the cloud filled the house of God, and the priests could not stand to minister because of the cloud, for the glory of God filled the house of God.‘ And this glory was not in the second house.

And how shall it be said, if so, ‹great shall be the glory of this later house above the first?‘” The poor unconverted Jew did not know the answer to his question: “Through the presence of God, in the substance of our flesh; through the son given to us, Whose name should be Mighty God.” The glory of this temple was in Him Who John 1:14. was made Flesh and dwelt among us, and we beheld His glory, the glory as of the Only Begotten of the Father, full of grace and truth.” “There Christ, the Son of God, was, as a Child, offered to God: there He sat in the midst of the Doctors; there He taught and revealed things, hidden from the foundation of the world. The glory of the temple of Solomon was, that in it the majesty of God appeared, veiling itself in a cloud: in this, that same Majesty showed itself, in very deed united with the Flesh, visible to sight: so that Jesus Himself said, John 14:9. “He that hath seen Me hath seen the Father.” This it was which Malachi sang with joy Malachi 3:1, “The Lord whom ye seek shall suddenly come to His temple, even the Messenger of the covenant, whom ye delight in.”

And in this place I will give peace - Temporal peace they had now, nor was there any prospect of its being disturbed. They were quiet subjects of the Persiam empire, which included also all their former enemies, greater or less. Alexander subdued all the bordering countries which did not yield, but spared themselves. Temporal peace then was nothing, to be then given them, for they had it. In later times they had it not. The temple itself was profaned by Antiochus Epiphanes (Isaiah 9:6-7 “the Prince of peace: of the increase of His government and of His peace there was to be no end;” in His days Psalm 72:3, Psalm 72:7 “the mountains were to bring peace to the people; there should be abundance of peace, so long as the moon endureth; the work of righteousness was to be peace Isaiah 32:17, the chastisement of our peace (that which obtained it) was upon Him” Isaiah 53:5, “great should be the peace of her children” Isaiah 54:13, in the Gospel God would give peace, true peace, to the “far off and the near” Isaiah 57:19. He would extend Isaiah 66:12 “peace to her like a river:” the good things of the Gospel was “the publishing of peace” Isaiah 52:7. The Gospel is described as Zechariah 9:10 “shall speak peace to the Pagan;” He himself should be “our peace” Micah 5:5. And when He was born, the angels proclaimed Luke 2:14 “on earth peace, goodwill toward men” Luke 1:79. “The Dayspring from on high visited us, to guide our feet into the way of peace.” He Himself says John 14:27, “My peace I leave with you.” He spake, that John 16:33 “in Me ye might have peace.” Peter sums up “the word which God sent unto the children of Israel, as Acts 10:36 preaching peace by Jesus Christ Romans 14:17. The kingdom of God is joy and peace Ephesians 2:14-15, Ephesians 2:17; Christ is our peace; made peace; preaches peace. God calleth us to peace” 1 Corinthians 7:15 in the Gospel Romans 5:1, “being justified by faith, we have peace with God through Jesus Christ our Lord Galatians 5:22, the fruit of the Spirit is love joy peace.” Spiritual peace being thus prominent in the Gospel and in prophecy, as the gift of God, it were unnatural to explain the peace which God promised here to give, as other than He promised elsewhere; peace in Him who is “our peace, Jesus Christ.”

“Peace and tranquility of mind is above all glory of the house; because peace passeth all understanding. This is peace above peace, which shall be given after the third shaking of heaven sea earth, dry land, when He shall destroy all powers anti principalities (in the day of judgment). - And so shall there be peace throughout, that, no bodily passions or hindrances of unbelieving mind resisting, Christ shall be all in all, exhibiting the hearts of all subdued to the Father.”

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Bibliographical Information
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Haggai 2:9". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/haggai-2.html. 1870.

The Biblical Illustrator

Haggai 2:9

In this place will I give peace, saith the Lord of hosts.

The nature, source, and means of spiritual, peace

Inquire--

I. Into the nature of the peace here spoken of. It includes peace with God, i.e, forgiveness, acceptance, reconciliation with Him. When this is witnessed to the soul by the Spirit of God the enmity is removed, or the will is subdued, and the affections are brought into captivity to the obedience of Christ. Peace of conscience, arising from pardon of past sin, and power over sin. A peaceful, serene, tranquil frame of mind; and peace with all men.

II. The author of this peace, and the way in which he will give it. It is not ourselves. Our own works cannot purchase it, nor reconcile us to God. It is not others; not their absolutions, prayers, or advices. It is the gift of God. He is its Author, and it comes from Him as a free gift.

III. Who are the subjects of it, or the persons to whom he will give it? It is purchased by Christ for all, and offered to all. But it cannot be possessed by the wicked. It cannot be the portion of the unbeliever. Repentance and faith are both the gifts of God, and must be sought in the use of prescribed means, such as hearing the Word of God and prayer.

IV. The place where he will give it, and the time when. All times and places may be considered holy under the Gospel. Nevertheless, when and where the Gospel is preached, and prayer offered to God, repentance and faith are usually given, and Christ in His Word and Spirit is peculiarly present. (J. Benson.)

God’s gift of peace

The Jews were taught to entertain new and more spiritual ideas of what it was in which the true glory of God’s house consisted,--that it was not in the grandeur of its elevation, nor the beauty of its decorations, nor the costliness of its furniture, though wrought in gold of Ophir, but in the presence of God there, and in the communication of peace to the contrite and humble spirit.

I. What is the peace here spoken of? It is a sense of reconciliation with God. When paradise was the abode of holiness, it was also the abode of peace; when once sin had entered, there was no peace to our first parents, so long as the taint of their disobedience remained unwashed away. The peace for which we are seeking is far removed from servile fear and bondage, and has in it the very spirit of a child. There is peace for us when we are enabled to look up to God as our heavenly Father, who hath begotten us again unto a lively hope through Christ,

II. What is our warrant for expecting this peace? Whence is it to be obtained? And how are we to know that it is ours? The Gospel is specially the dispensation of peace; Christ is our peace. He is “the repairer of the breach,” the way, the truth, the life, the door which leadeth unto the Father. There are systems full of error which, nevertheless, hold out fair promises of peace, and pretend that they alone can secure its possession. The infidel boasts that he can give peace. Our peace depends on what Christ has done for us, and has promised to do in us, and not on what we can do in and for ourselves; and our possession of peace depends on the confidence with which we believe His word and rely upon His power. This is the teaching which gives peace to the troubled conscience, and we confidently assert that it is the teaching of our Church. (Bishop Shirley.)

Spiritual rest in political strife

It is Christ who really speaks to us, both out of the Old Testament and out of the New, this blessed message of the Lord, “In this place will I give peace.” It is His Spirit which revealed it to the prophet; it is His Word which is uttered in the Gospel; it is He Himself who gives it to us now and for evermore. “He is our peace” (Ephesians 2:14). This was the glorious prospect lifted up before those who, coming back from the captivity of Zion, set to work on the restoration of that temple which they had never forgotten in a strange land. There was much, it is true, to sadden them. The place looked not like the ancient and beautiful house from which they had been driven seventy years before. And yet God told them to be strong and work, for He was with them. “The latter glory of this house shall be greater than the former, saith the Lord of hosts: and in this place I will give peace.” Five centuries passed away, and all the nations were in expectation; and all the nations happened by Divine appointment to be at peace. This was but an outward thing, however blessed, compared with that holy rest prepared for the people of God, and brought into the world by that eternal Son of God, in whom righteousness and peace kissed each other. That Son of God was made a human babe, and the angels sang, “On earth peace.” He grew to manhood, and always, though with warnings mingled, He spake of peace. He sailed upon the stormy waves, and said to them, “Peace be still.” And so throughout His life. It is His promise concerning His sanctuary. “In this place will I give peace.”

I. He Himself is in the midst of us. There is a holy presence here, and this should quiet our hearts with reverence and godly fear, and yet fill us with peace and joy. We draw nigh to Him, and He draws nigh to us. We lift up our hearts to Him in supplication, and the peace of God which passeth all understanding will keep our hearts and minds through Christ Jesus.

II. He gives us here His “Gospel of peace.” Even if the clergyman’s heart is heavy, the lips of the evangelist utter the blessed tidings, and the word in season helps the soul of the weary. But the Gospel is only a pleasant song to us, until we act upon it in penitence and faith; but then obedience is the path to peace.

III. He keeps us secretly in His tabernacle from the strife of tongues. Though His presence, realised even in common life, keeps us peaceful in the midst of strife, yet there is a special calm about His house which gives us pause and refreshment after we have striven, and before we go again into conflict--a calm which bids us, on the Lord’s day and in the Lord’s house, set aside all thoughts of party, all the bitterness of controversy, and, instead, pray for one another, that thus, as far as lieth in us, we may live peaceably with all men. Then, let all the occasions of your life, all the changes which you experience, be sanctified in the place where He, according to His promise, is sure to be found. Christ is here, so here is liberty and light, here is strength and comfort. Christ is here, and so when we come before Him with an” humble, lowly, penitent, and obedient heart,” He meets us with that priceless blessing, “Peace be unto you.” (G. E. Jelf, M. A.)

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Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Exell, Joseph S. "Commentary on "Haggai 2:9". The Biblical Illustrator. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tbi/haggai-2.html. 1905-1909. New York.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

"The latter glory of this house shall be greater than the former, saith Jehovah of hosts; and in this place will I give peace, saith Jehovah of hosts."

We have already seen that the true meaning of all that Haggai said was that the glory of Christianity should far outshine the glory of Judaism. The new Temple, the Church, would far surpass the temples of Jerusalem. Now, with reference to whether or not Haggai fully understood all the Lord said through him, we may freely concede that he most probably did not, but as we have repeatedly observed, the subjective imaginations and guesses by scholars trying to figure out what they suppose Haggai thought he was saying are absolutely irrelevant. We hold that the words were not Haggai's at all, but God's; and as Peter indicated (1 Peter 1:10-12), students in the present dispensation have a far better opportunity to understand what God wrote through that prophet than he did.

Therefore, although Haggai probably understood God's words which came through him as predictions of what would be fulfilled with regard to the physical temple they were rebuilding, discerning students of the holy Scriptures cannot fail to understand that much more was included in the heavenly meaning of this magnificent Messianic passage (Haggai 2:6-9). As Wiseman noted, "There was a first fulfillment soon after Haggai wrote, but not completely until Christ's reign."[13]

Before leaving this wonderful Messianic prophecy, we must call attention to the rendition of the KJV in Haggai 2:7, which reads:

"I will shake all nations; and the desire of all nations shall come: and I will fill this house with glory, saith the Lord of hosts."

In every way, this translation is far more suitable than subsequent renditions. The translators of most of the versions and translations since the KJV have made "desire" plural, reading it "the desires" "the precious things," "the desirable things," etc.; and, while we must accept the grammatical logic of this, it could very well be that the translators have been too much influenced by the Septuagint (LXX) in this place. Charles L. Feinberg discussed this verse as follows:

"It is well to remember, however, that from the earliest days the majority of Christian interpreters followed the Jewish tradition in referring the passage to the coming of Israel's Messiah. It seems clear that the longing all nations have in common must be their yearning for the Deliverer, whether or not they realize the nature of their desire or the identity of its true fulfillment in the Lord Jesus Christ.

"Moreover, in Hebrew an abstract noun is often used instead of the concrete; thus a reference to the Messiah is not automatically ruled out on the basis of language considerations. The use of a plural verb here does not militate against the Messianic interpretation, for there are instances in which the verb agrees with the second of two nouns."[14]SIZE>

This writer does not claim any competence to decide such a question of Hebrew grammar; but, upon the unequivocal analysis of such a scholar as Feinberg (Dean, and Professor of Semitics, Talbot Theological Seminary, La Mirada, California), which, as far as we are able to determine is not contradicted by any authority whatever, we must in conscience receive the rendition which, to us, is clearly demanded by the entire context.

Haggai 2:7 plainly connects the filling of God's house with glory to the prior fact of the "Desire of all nations" having been brought into it; and "the desirable things" of all nations such as their wealth, their gold and silver, could not in any sense be viewed as "the glory" of God's house. The very next verse reminds us that God already owns all the gold and silver; and far from being an explanation of the nature of the promised glory, verse 8 is an explanation of what the glory is not!

Despite our preference for the KJV in this verse, the commentary above is written upon our version (ASV) and interpreted accordingly.

Gill properly discerned the true "glory" of the Lord's house. It is that "peace" mentioned at the conclusion of Haggai 2:9.

"The peace which prevails in the true and more glorious temple of God is not "as the world gives" (John 14:27). It comes only from complete surrender to and complete trust in Him Who is the meaning of the old temple and the High Priest of the new."[15]

"In this place will I give peace, saith Jehovah of hosts ..." In no sense may this be applied to the rebuilt temple; only in Christ is there "peace that passeth understanding." As for Zerubbabel's building,

"That which made it both sanctuary and temple was missing. Yahweh's glory did not fill it. Yahweh was not present there in creating and redeeming power."[16]

"Peace ..." The RSV and other versions have rendered this word "prosperity" for no compelling reason; and again we are compelled to find fault with this type of tampering with the Word of God. The Hebrew word here is "Shalom."[17] And, while it is true enough that it "has a comprehensive meaning, signifying total mental, spiritual, and physical well-being,"[18] "peace" is the primary meaning of the word; and it is thus used at the present time by Jews all over the world. To make this read "prosperity" is ridiculous, for the present-day meaning of "prosperity" leaves out of sight all the higher significance of the passage.

"In this place ..." As Keil accurately pointed out, "This place is not the temple, but the city of Jerusalem,"[19] from which place the word of the Lord went forth from Mount Zion. Again, it is the glory of the New Covenant in Christ Jesus that provides the complete fulfillment of the passage. "Peace" for mankind never yet came out of a Jewish temple.

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Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
Bibliographical Information
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Haggai 2:9". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/haggai-2.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

The glory of this latter house shall be greater than of the former, saith the Lord of hosts,.... The "former", or first house, was the temple built by Solomon, which was a very glorious one, if we consider the vast treasure of riches laid up by David, and given to Solomon for the building of it; the great number of workmen employed in it; the stateliness of the fabric, the like to which was never seen, the model being drawn by the Lord himself; the decoration of it; the vessels in it; and, above all, the glory of the Lord that filled it, and continued in it; and yet this "latter" or second house exceeded it. It must be a glory very great indeed to exceed this! The JewsF13T. Hieros. Taaniot, fol. 65. 1. T. Bab. Yoma, fol. 21. 2. Jarchi & Kimchi in Hagg. i. 8. themselves own there were several things wanting in the latter which were in the former, as the "ark", the "Urim" and "Thummim", the "fire" from heaven, the "Shechinah" (or, as in some books, the anointing oil, and, in others, the cherubim), and the "Holy Ghost": by one of their writersF14Baal Aruch in rad. כבד, fol. 75. 3. , they are reckoned in this order, the ark, the mercy seat, and cherubim, one; the Shechinah or divine Majesty, the second; the Holy Ghost, which is prophecy, the third; Urim and Thummim the fourth: and the fire from heaven the fifth: what could there be in it to compensate the want of these, and put it upon a level, and even to cause it to excel the temple of Solomon? the excelling glory did not lie in the fabric; when the foundation of it was laid, the old men wept, because it came so short of the other; and, as the building rose, it was in their eyes as nothing; who were better judges than later Jews, who magnify the building of the second temple; depending upon the authority of Josephus ben Gorion, who is not to be trusted: nor did it lie in the duration of it, it continuing ten years longer, they sayF15T. Bab. Bava Bathra, fol. 3. 1. , than the former; which, if true, could not answer to the deficiencies before mentioned; or be an encouragement to the builders to go on in their work: nor in the riches brought into it by the Gentiles in the times of the Maccabees, which was very inconsiderable; and could never make it equal to Solomon's temple, and much less preferable to it; nor by Alexander the great honouring it with his presenceF16Azariah, Meor Enayim, c. 51. fol. 160. 1. Vid. Ganz Tzemach David, par. 1. fol. 23. 2. & 24. 1. ; for surely Solomon was greater than he. It remains, that what gave it the greater glory was the personal presence of the Messiah in it, his doctrines, and his miracles:

and, or "for",

in this place will I give peace, saith the Lord of hosts; not temporal peace, for there was little of that during the second temple; witness the times of the Maccabees, and the wars with the Romans; but spiritual peace, through the blood and righteousness of Christ; peace with God; reconciliation for sin, through the sacrifice of the Son of God, in whom he is well pleased; yea, Christ himself may be meant, the Prince of peace, the Man the peace, who is our peace, Isaiah 9:6 the author of peace between God and men, between Jew and Gentile; the giver of spiritual and eternal peace: him the Lord gave, "put", and set in this place, the temple, as before observed; and where the Gospel of peace was preached, and from whence it went forth into all the world. The Arabic version adds,

"peace of soul, I say, to be possessed by everyone that labours to raise up this temple.'

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
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Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Haggai 2:9". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/haggai-2.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

The glory of this latter house shall be greater than of the former, saith the LORD of hosts: and in this place will I give f peace, saith the LORD of hosts.

(f) Meaning all spiritual blessings and felicity purchased by Christ; (Philippians 4:7).
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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Haggai 2:9". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/haggai-2.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

greater than of the former — namely, through the presence of Messiah, in (whose) face is given the light of the knowledge of the glory of God (2 Corinthians 4:6; compare Hebrews 1:2), and who said of Himself, “in this place is one greater than the temple” (Matthew 12:6), and who “sat daily teaching in it” (Matthew 26:55). Though Zerubbabel‘s temple was taken down to the foundations when Herod rebuilt the temple, the latter was considered, in a religious point of view, as not a third temple, but virtually the second temple.

in this place  …  peace — namely, at Jerusalem, the metropolis of the kingdom of God, whose seat was the temple: where Messiah “made peace through the blood of His cross” (Colossians 1:20). Thus the “glory” consists in this “peace.” This peace begins by the removal of the difficulty in the way of the just God accepting the guilty (Psalm 85:8, Psalm 85:10; Isaiah 9:6, Isaiah 9:7; Isaiah 53:5; Zechariah 6:13; 2 Corinthians 5:18, 2 Corinthians 5:19); then it creates peace in the sinner‘s own heart (Isaiah 57:19; Acts 10:36; Romans 5:1; Romans 14:17; Ephesians 2:13-17; Philippians 4:7); then peace in the whole earth (Micah 5:5; Luke 2:14). First peace between God and man, then between man and God, then between man and man (Isaiah 2:4; Hosea 2:18; Zechariah 9:10). As “Shiloh” (Genesis 49:10) means peace, this verse confirms the view that Haggai 2:7, “the desire of all nations,” refers to Shiloh or Messiah, foretold in Genesis 49:10.

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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Haggai 2:9". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/haggai-2.html. 1871-8.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

The glory of this latter house shall be greater than of the former, saith the LORD of hosts: and in this place will I give peace, saith the LORD of hosts.

In this place — In my house, a type of Christ.

Peace — A spiritual, internal, and heavenly peace.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
Bibliographical Information
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Haggai 2:9". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/haggai-2.html. 1765.

Scofield's Reference Notes

latter house

In a sense all the temples (i.e Solomon's; Ezra's; Herod's; that which will be used by the unbelieving Jews under covenant with the Beast Daniel 9:27; Matthew 24:15; 2 Thessalonians 2:3; 2 Thessalonians 2:4 and Ezekiel's future kingdom temple Ezekiel 40-47.), are treated as one "house"-- the "house of the Lord," since they all profess to be that. For that reason Christ purified the temple of His day, erected though it was by an Idumean usurper to please the Jews. Matthew 21:12; Matthew 21:13.

glory Or, the future glory of this house shall be greater than the former.

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Scofield, C. I. "Scofield Reference Notes on Haggai 2:9". "Scofield Reference Notes (1917 Edition)". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/srn/haggai-2.html. 1917.

James Nisbet's Church Pulpit Commentary

THE LATTER AND THE FORMER GLORY

‘The glory of this latter house shall be greater than of the former, saith the Lord of Hosts.’

Haggai 2:9

The old men, whose memory could stretch back some seventy years, saw in their fond imagination the wonderful pile of Solomon’s Temple shining in gold, which borrowed richer hues than its own from the heart that had treasured during all these years the holy vision. How poor and prosaic and shrunken the walls of the new Temple seemed to them! Yet God assures them that the glory of the latter house should far exceed that of the former. As regards material splendour that would never be. Even regarding sacred relics and symbols, the second Temple would never approach the glory of the first. Where was now the ark with its wondrous treasures? Where the Shechinah and the Urim and the Thummin? All have passed away; and yet, says God, ‘The glory of the latter house shall be greater than of the former.’

I. The latter house recorded a fuller history of God’s working than the former.—The latter house was heir to all the stirring and wonderful memories of the former, and had its own great repository besides. The songs which were sung within its walls not only celebrated the Exodus and the other great deliverances for which their fathers praised the Lord, but the sorrows and hopelessness of Babylon, followed by the glorious restoration which filled their hearts with laughter, and their tongues with melody. And as the ages rolled over them, a richer accumulation of God’s wonderful works to His Chosen People inspired the praises of the sanctuary. The ‘latter house’ is ever in this respect more glorious than ‘the former.’ Of what a history of God’s providence and grace are we who live in these latter days cognisant! With what wonder and trust and joy should we, beyond all former ages, praise the Lord for His goodness, and for His wonderful works to the children of men!

II. The latter house was the house of a purer worship than the former.—One great sin the Jews were cured of by their captivity in Babylon; that was the sin of idolatry. Before that time they were ever lapsing into it; and reformers, such as the good King Josiah, had to purge the very Temple itself of idols and idolatrous altars. God has said that His glory He will not give to graven images; and as a small cloud can hide for a time the glory of the sun, so the dark sin of idolatry obscured to a great extent the glory of God in His own house. When we serve God, Who is a Spirit, in spirit and in truth, the humblest cabin in which we may worship is lighted by purer and richer glory than the first Temple in its palmiest days.

III. The latter house received a greater Guest than the former.—The house is honoured by those who dwell in it and visit it. The poorest cottage is an incomparably more sacred and honoured place than the most celebrated and costly structures reared for any creatures other than man. In the former house more powerful kings, and grander choirs of singers, and more richly attired priests with costlier sacrifices, worshipped and served than in the latter; but the Lord, Whom true worshippers had ever sought and longed for, suddenly came to it, and so gave it a glory which the former had never known. A greater glory still may be ours. What! know ye not that ye are the temples of the Holy Ghost? Not as a casual guest does Christ seek to enter our hearts; He seeks to come in and abide with us—to be with us always, even to the end of the world.

IV. The latter house resounded with a clearer and grander message than the former.—In the former the worshipper spelt out the message of reconciliation and restored communion with fallen man by the help of bleeding victims and emblematic feasts; in the latter, the Saviour Himself cried—‘If any man thirst, let him come unto Me and drink.’ And the apostles went thither and ‘preached all the words of this life.’ And to us of these latter times is the word of this salvation sent; and this is a message which makes the rudest barn more truly glorious than the first Temple in all its magnificence.

Illustration

‘There must have been something connected with the former Temple as compared with the latter Temple, constituting it a more fit representative of the Church of Christ. The cardinal distinction must have consisted in the more spiritual character which life, and faith, and worship assumed in the best times of Judaism after the Restoration, the Temple being of course understood to represent then, as of old, the theocratic community of which it was the centre. Rites and ceremonies retired more into the background; and prayer began to assume its true place in public worship. The religious knowledge of the people was kept up through the regular public reading and distribution of the Scriptures, which were early collected into their present canonical form. Synagogues were established, the people having learnt at Babylon that God’s Presence might be enjoyed in their assemblies in any place or circumstances. Thus there was kept alive throughout the nation a higher and purer type of religion than it had known in the days when the first Temple with its outward splendour and gorgeous ritual excited the admiration of the people, but too seldom led their thoughts to the contemplation of the truths it expressed and prefigured. These we regard as some of the characteristics of the second Temple, which on the one hand exalted it above its predecessor, and on the other assimilated it to the Church of Christ, of which it thus became the fit representative in the Divine promises. This was the true glory of the second Temple.’

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Nisbet, James. "Commentary on Haggai 2:9". Church Pulpit Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cpc/haggai-2.html. 1876.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Haggai 2:9 The glory of this latter house shall be greater than of the former, saith the LORD of hosts: and in this place will I give peace, saith the LORD of hosts.

Ver. 9. The glory of this latter house shall be greater than of the former] Because Christ shall appear and preach in it, {as Haggai 2:7} who is the brightness of his Father’s glory, ac consequenter urbis et orbis; any relation to whom heighteneth and ennobleth both places and persons. Bethlehem, though it be the least, [Micah 3:6] is yet not the least among the princes of Judah, [Matthew 2:6] because Christ was born there. The tribe of Naphtali is first reckoned of those by Rachel’s side; because at Capernaum, in this tribe, Christ inhabited, Revelation 7:6, in which respect also this town is said to be lifted up to heaven, Matthew 11:2-3. Benjamin is called the beloved of the Lord, Genesis 42:4, God’s darling (as their father Benjamin was old Jacob’s), because God dwelt between his shoulders, sc. in his temple built upon those two mountains, Moriah and Zion, Deuteronomy 33:12. The glory of that first temple was, that the majesty of God appeared in it, covering itself in a cloud. The glory of this latter house was greater, because therein the same Divine majesty appeared, not covered with a cloud but really incarnated. "For the Word was made flesh, and dwelt among us, and we beheld his glory, the glory as of the only begotten of the Father, full of grace and truth," John 1:14. In this flesh of ours, and under this second temple, Christ not only uttered oracles, did miracles, and finished the great work of our redemption, but also laid the foundation of the Christian Church. For the law (that perfect law of liberty, the gospel, James 1:25) came out of Zion, and the word of the Lord from Jerusalem, to all the ends of the earth, Isaiah 2:3, Psalms 110:1. From hence it was that the Lord of glory, whom the blind Jews had crucified, sent out his apostles, those messengers of the churches, and the glory of Christ, as they are called, 2 Corinthians 8:23, to gather together unto him those desirable ones his elect, [Haggai 2:7] {See Trapp on "Haggai 2:7"} whom he calleth the glory, Isaiah 46:13, the house of his glory, Isaiah 60:7, a crown of glory, Isaiah 62:3, the throne of glory, Jeremiah 14:21, the ornament of God, Ezekiel 7:20, the beauty of his ornament, and that set in majesty, a royal diadem in the hand of Jehovah, Isaiah 62:3.

And in this place will I give peace] Even the Prince of peace, and with him all things also, Romans 8:32, pacem Pectoris et Temporis, Peace of country and of conscience; this latter especially seemeth here to be meant. For the former (viz. outward peace) was not long enjoyed by these Jews; and their second temple was often spoiled by the enemies, and at length burned and overturned. But the "peace of God that passeth all understanding" is that legacy which the world can neither give nor take from God’s people, John 14:27. And of this inward peace the Septuagint (according to the Roman edition) taketh the text, and so doth Ambrose; Haec est pax super pacem, This is peace above peace. saith he. Christ, as he Was brought from heaven, with that song of peace, Luke 2:14 "On earth peace, good will toward men" (which is the same with that salutation of St Paul, who learned it, belike, of those angels, "Grace be to you, and peace"), so he returned up again with that farewell of peace, John 14:27, and left to the world the doctrine of peace, the gospel of peace, Ephesians 2:17, whose author is the God of peace, 1 Corinthians 14:33, whose ministers are ministers of peace, Romans 10:15, whose followers are the children of peace, Luke 10:6, whose unity is in the bond of peace, Ephesians 4:3, whose duty is the study of peace, Romans 12:18; and whose end is, to enter into peace, to rest in their beds, their souls resting in heaven, their bodies in the grave till the joyful resurrection, even every one walking in his uprightness, Isaiah 57:2, Psalms 37:33.

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on Haggai 2:9". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/haggai-2.html. 1865-1868.

Sermon Bible Commentary

Haggai 2:9

I. These words refer to the first and the second temple at Jerusalem. The first temple was burnt by the Chaldees, and the wall of Jerusalem was broken down, and the people carried captive to Babylon, and it was more than fifty years after that the foundation of the second house was laid. It was an occasion to stir up mixed feelings among the people. The glory of their nation had passed away. They came back as exiles, by the permission of a foreign power, to the land that their fathers had conquered. Hope and recollection struggled against each other, when they dwelt by turns on the state from which they had been cast down, and on their hopes of restoration. Jehovah would not manifest Himself in the same degree as He had before to a people who were suffering the punishment of their backslidings; and the house they had built Him was but a poor copy of the temple that had perished. Yet Haggai promised that this second temple in its poverty should be more glorious than the first, because the desire of all nations, even Christ Himself, should come to it, and the Lord of hosts should fill it with glory.

II. This teaches us that it is not the house, but the presence that sanctifies the house, that constitutes its glory. It rests with us to hinder or help the work of God according as we seek God here in earnest, or let our hearts go after covetousness.

Archbishop Thomson, Lincoln's Inn Sermons, p. 390.


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Nicoll, William R. "Commentary on Haggai 2:9". "Sermon Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/sbc/haggai-2.html.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

The glory, which God intends to put upon this temple. Solomon. and a rich people, with incredible spoils taken from conquered nations, gave a glory to the first house, but God himself will give the glory of this house.

This latter house, which poor captives and feudatory governors do build, this second temple: the prophet speaks of it as if it were already a house, whereas it was now to be built. What God accounts a glory, must be somewhat better than silver and gold.

Greater than of the former; more truly glory, and in higher degrees; the least of Christ is greater glory than all the magnificence of Solomon. There were no more but two houses built by God’s appointment, into the latter of which the Messiah was personally to come, as Malachi 3:1: therefore he came before that latter temple was destroyed, that is, 1684 years ago, when at two months old he was presented in the temple, embraced and confessed by Simeon, some seventy years before the temple was burnt by the Romans.

In this place; in my house, type of Christ, and who is the glory of it.

Will I give peace; a spiritual, internal, and heavenly peace, in pardoning guilt and destroying sin, which displeaseth God, and disquieteth man himself. Christ made peace on his cross, preached or published it to the world, and gives it to them by the power of his Spirit.

Saith the Lord of hosts; solemnly avowed by the Lord of hosts, who cannot deceive, or be deceived.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Haggai 2:9". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/haggai-2.html. 1685.

Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable

Even though the present temple was less glorious than Solomon"s temple, the Lord promised that the final glory of the temple would be greater than its former glory. The Lord also promised to bring peace to the site of the temple, Jerusalem. Neither of these things has happened yet, so the fulfillment must be future (millennial). Lasting peace will only come when Messiah returns to rule and reign (cf. Isaiah 2:4; Isaiah 9:6; Zechariah 9:9-10). Jesus Christ"s adornment of the second temple, as renovated by Herod the Great, with His presence hardly seems to fulfill the exalted promises in this prophecy. [Note: Chisholm, "A Theology . . .," p421.]

The Lord used the occasion of the feast of Tabernacles to encourage the builders of the temple in Haggai"s day. This feast looked back to the Exodus, reminded the Israelites of their wilderness wanderings, and anticipated settlement in the Promised Land. This message also looked back to the Exodus, referred to the present temple construction, and anticipated the glory of the future temple.

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Constable, Thomas. DD. "Commentary on Haggai 2:9". "Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dcc/haggai-2.html. 2012.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

latter house, &c. Render: "Greater shall he the last glory of this house than the first". Ezekiel 48:2. Ezekiel 4:5; Ezekiel 44:4.

peace. Compare Isaiah 9:6. Micah 5:5. Zechariah 9:9, Zechariah 9:10.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Haggai 2:9". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/haggai-2.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

The glory of this latter house shall be greater than of the former, saith the LORD of hosts: and in this place will I give peace, saith the LORD of hosts.

The glory of this latter house shall be greater than of the former - namely, through the presence of Messiah, in whose face is given the light of the knowledge of the glory of God (2 Corinthians 4:6 : cf. Hebrews 1:2), and who said of Himself, "In this place is one [or, literally, a something greater, meizon (Greek #3185): the indefiniteness marking the infinite vastness whereby He is] greater than the temple" (Matthew 12:6), and who "sat daily teaching in it" (Matthew 26:55). Though Zerubbabel's temple was taken down to the foundations when Herod rebuilt the temple, the latter was considered, in a religious point of view, as not a third temple, but virtually the second temple.

And in this place will I give peace - namely, at Jerusalem, the metropolis of the kingdom of God, whose seat was the temple, where Messiah "made peace through the blood of His cross" (Colossians 1:20). Thus the "glory" consists in this "peace." This peace begins by the removal of the difficulty in the way of the just God accepting the guilty (Psalms 85:8; Psalms 85:10; Isaiah 9:6-7; Isaiah 53:5; Zechariah 6:13; 2 Corinthians 5:18-19); then it creates peace in the sinner's own heart (Isaiah 57:19; Acts 10:36; Romans 5:1; Romans 14:17; Ephesians 2:13-17; Philippians 4:7); then it shall at last make peace in the whole earth (Micah 5:5; Luke 2:14). First, peace between God and man, then between man and God, then between man and man (Isaiah 2:4; Hosea 2:18; Zechariah 9:1-17; Zechariah 10:1-12). As "Shiloh" (Genesis 49:10) means peace, this verse confirms the view that Haggai 2:7, "the Desire of all nations," refers to Shiloh or Messiah, foretold in Genesis 49:10.

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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Haggai 2:9". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/haggai-2.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(9) The glory . . .—Better, The latter glory of this house shall be greater than the former. The new sanctuary is regarded as identical with that reared by Solomon. It shall have a claim to celebrity unrivalled even in the palmiest days of olden time, when Jehovah shall turn the attention of all nations to His sacred place, as predicted in Haggai 2:6-7.

Between this third utterance and the fourth (Haggai 2:10-19) intervenes Zechariah’s exhortation to repentance (Zechariah 1:2-6) uttered in the eighth month.

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Haggai 2:9". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/haggai-2.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

The glory of this latter house shall be greater than of the former, saith the LORD of hosts: and in this place will I give peace, saith the LORD of hosts.
glory
Psalms 24:7-10; John 1:14; 2 Corinthians 3:9,10; 1 Timothy 3:16; James 2:1
saith
Whoever compares the description of the temple of Solomon, in the first book of Kings, with the most splendid accounts of the second temple, however adorned with costly stones and other magnificent decorations in after ages, must perceive that the former, being wholly overlaid with pure gold, was incomparably more glorious than the latter in its greatest magnificence; and the Jews themselves allow that the ark of the covenant, fire from heaven, the Urim and Thummim, the anointing oil, the Shechinah, or visible glory, and the spirit of prophecy, which distinguished the former temple, were wanting in this. In nothing, in fact, could the second temple excel the first in glory, except in the personal presence of "the Desire of all nations," He who is "the glory of the Lord," and the true temple, "in whom dwells all the fulness of the Godhead bodily," and who was the true Shechinah, of which that of Solomon's temple was merely a type. And if it be admitted that the presence of the promised Messiah was intended, then it will follow that "Jesus of Nazareth" was He; for the second temple, in which as the "Prince of peace" he preached peace and reconciliation with God, has been utterly destroyed for upwards of seventeen hundred years.
give
Psalms 85:8,9; Isaiah 9:6,7; 57:18-21; Micah 5:5; Luke 2:14; John 14:27; Acts 10:36; Ephesians 2:14-17; Colossians 1:19-21
Reciprocal: Exodus 40:34 - a cloud;  Leviticus 26:6 - I will;  1 Chronicles 22:5 - exceeding;  1 Chronicles 22:9 - I will give peace;  Proverbs 1:13 - GeneralIsaiah 11:10 - his rest;  Ezekiel 10:4 - and the house;  Matthew 21:3 - The Lord;  Luke 6:24 - woe;  2 Thessalonians 3:16 - give

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Haggai 2:9". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/haggai-2.html.