Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Hebrews 10:2

Otherwise, would they not have ceased to be offered, because the worshipers, having once been cleansed, would no longer have had consciousness of sins?
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Atonement;   Law;   Offerings;   Purity;   Sin;   Types;   The Topic Concordance - Desire;   Jesus Christ;   Law;   Pleasure;   Reconciliation;   Sacrifice;   Sanctification;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Conscience;   Sacrifices;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Law;   Testament;   Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Law;   Leviticus;   Priest;   Sacrifice;   Type, typology;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Law;   Life;   Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Atonement;   Covenant;   Peace;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Atonement;   Christianity;   Hebrews, the Epistle to the;   High Priest;   Lord's Supper;   Sacrifice;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Expiation, Propitiation;   Forgiveness;   Hebrews;   Reconcilation;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Conscience;   Law;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Blood ;   Conscience ;   Day of Atonement ;   Gospel;   Guilt (2);   Hebrews Epistle to the;   Perseverance;   Sin;   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Atonement, Day of;   10 Forgiveness Remission;   13 To Worship, Serve;   The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Christ;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Law;   Obsolete or obscure words in the english av bible;   Offering;  
Encyclopedias:
Condensed Biblical Cyclopedia - Law of Moses, the;   International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Accommodation;   Hebrews, Epistle to the;   Purge;   Worship;  
Devotionals:
Daily Light on the Daily Path - Devotion for April 12;   Every Day Light - Devotion for November 26;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

Would they not have ceased to be offered? - Had they made an effectual reconciliation for the sins of the world, and contained in their once offering a plenitude of permanent merit, they would have ceased to be offered, at least in reference to any individual who had once offered them; because, in such a case, his conscience would be satisfied that its guilt had been taken away. But no Jew pretended to believe that even the annual atonement cancelled his sin before God; yet he continued to make his offerings, the law of God having so enjoined, because these sacrifices pointed out that which was to come. They were offered, therefore, not in consideration of their own efficacy, but as referring to Christ; See on Hebrews 9:9; (note).

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Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Hebrews 10:2". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/hebrews-10.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

For then would they not have ceased to be offered? - Margin, “Or they would have.” The sense is the same. The idea is, that the very fact that they were repeated showed that there was some deficiency in them as to the matter of cleansing the soul from sin. If they had answered all the purposes of a sacrifice in putting away guilt, there would have been no need of repeating them in this manner. They were in this respect like medicine. If what is given to a patient heals him, there is no need of repeating it; but if it is repeated often it shows that there was some deficiency in it, and if taken periodically through a man‘s life, and the disease should still remain, it would show that it was not sufficient to effect his cure. So it was with the offerings made by the Jews. They were offered every year, and indeed every day, and still the disease of sin remained. The conscience was not satisfied; and the guilty felt that it was necessary that the sacrifice should be repeated again and again.

Because that the worshippers once purged should have had no more conscience of sin - That is, if their sacrifices had so availed as to remove their past sins, and to procure forgiveness, they would have had no more trouble of conscience on account of them. They would not have felt that it was necessary to make these sacrifices over and over again in order to find peace. When a man has full evidence that an atonement has been made which will meet all the demands of the Law, and which secures the remission of sin, he feels that it is enough. It is all that the case demands, and his conscience may have peace. But when he does “not” feel this, or has not evidence that his sins are all forgiven, those sins will rise to remembrance, and he will be alarmed. He may be punished for them after all. Thence it follows that if a man wants peace he should have good evidence that his sins are forgiven through the blood of the atonement.

No temporary expedient; no attempt to cover them up; no effort to forget them will answer the purpose. They “must be blotted out” if he will have peace - and that can be only through a perfect sacrifice. By the use of the word rendered “conscience” here, it is not meant that he who was pardoned would have no “consciousness” that he was a sinner, or that he would forget it, but that he would have no trouble of conscience; he would have no apprehension of future wrath. The pardon of sin does not cause it to cease to be remembered. He who is forgiven may have a deeper conviction of its evil than he had ever had before. But he will not be troubled or distressed by it as if it were to expose him to the wrath of God. The remembrance of it will humble him; it will serve to exalt his conceptions of the mercy of God and the glory of the atonement, but it will no longer overwhelm the mind with the dread of hell. This effect, the apostle says, was not produced on the minds of those who offered sacrifices every year. The very fact that they did it, showed that the conscience was not at peace.

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Hebrews 10:2". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/hebrews-10.html. 1870.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

Else would they not have ceased to be offered? because the worshipers, having been once cleansed, would have had no more consciousness of sins.

The problem in this verse lies in the question of why it is implied that efficacious sacrifices able to perfect the worshipers, if they had existed, would have ceased. Would there not have been more and more men of each succeeding generation who needed to have the benefit of such sacrifices? Westcott said,

The inefficiency of the sacrifices is proved by their repetition. If it be said that the repeated sacrifices dealt only with later sins, the answer is that we have to deal with sin and not with sins only; to be assured that our true relationship with God has been re-established. A sacrifice which offers this for humanity, and we need no less, cannot be repeated.[3]

In this same vein of thought, Lenski said:

If any person should sin and be disturbed in conscience, all he would need to do would be to turn in repentance to that final sacrifice as we now return to Christ's sacrifice. A final sacrifice would not need to be repeated for any person's sin.[4]

True as the above scholarly views appear, however, there is another sense in which the sacred text may be understood. As Milligan noted,

If these bloody sacrifices had been really efficacious in taking away the sins of the people, there would, of course, have been no need of repeating them WITH REFERENCE TO THE SAME SINS (emphasis mine).

Milligan goes on to show that there was a repetition of the sacrifices over and over, with regard to the same sins. He said:

Besides these special offerings, others were offered daily (Exodus 29:38ff, weekly (Numbers 28:9,10), monthly (Numbers 28:11-15), and yearly at each of the three great festivals (Leviticus 28). But nevertheless, on the tenth day of the seventh month, all the sins of the past year were again called into remembrance and an atonement made.[5]

Milligan further pointed out that even the sacred services of the great Day of Atonement failed to prevent the same sins from being remembered again, as proved by the ceremony of the scapegoat which bore "away" the sins of the people, a thing that would not have been required if the sins had truly been forgiven or no longer existed.

[3] Brooke Foss Westcott, op. cit., p. 305.

[4] R. C. H. Lenski, The Interpretation of the Epistle to the Hebrews and the Epistle of James (Minneapolis, Minnesota: Augsburg Publishing House, 1938), p. 235.

[5] R. Milligan, New Testament Commentary (Nashville: Gospel Advocate Company, 1962), p. 267.

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Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
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Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Hebrews 10:2". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/hebrews-10.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

For then would they not have ceased to be offered,.... The Complutensian edition, and the Syriac and Vulgate Latin versions, leave out the word "not"; and the sense requires it should be omitted, for the meaning is, that if perfection had been by the legal sacrifices, they would have ceased to have been offered; for if the former ones had made perfect, there would have been no need of others, or of the repetition of the same; but because they did not make perfect, therefore they were yearly renewed; unless the words are read with an interrogation, as they are in the Arabic version, "for then would they not have ceased to be offered?" yes, they would; they are indeed ceased now, but this is owing to Christ and his sacrifice, and not to the efficacy of these sacrifices; for yearly sacrifices were offered for former sins, as well as for fresh ones, as appears from the following verse.

Because the worshippers, once purged, would have had no more conscience of sins; there are external and internal worshippers; the latter are such who worship God in Spirit and in truth: but here ceremonial worshippers are meant, who, if they had been really purged from sin by legal sacrifices, and purifications, would have had no more conscience of sins, and so have had no need to have repeated them; as such spiritual worshippers, who are once purged from sin by the blood and sacrifice of Christ; not that they have no sin, or no sense of sin, or that their consciences are seared, or that they never accuse for sin, or that they are to make no confession and acknowledgment of sin; but that they are discharged from the guilt of sin, and are not liable to condemnation for it; and through the application of the blood of Christ to them, have peace with God, and joy in the Holy Ghost.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
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Gill, John. "Commentary on Hebrews 10:2". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/hebrews-10.html. 1999.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

For — if the law could, by its sacrifices, have perfected the worshippers.

they — the sacrifices.

once purged — IF they were once for all cleansed (Hebrews 7:27).

conscience — “consciousness of sin” (Hebrews 9:9).

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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Hebrews 10:2". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/hebrews-10.html. 1871-8.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

Else they would not have ceased? (επει ουκ αν επαυσαντοepei ouk an epausanto). Ellipsis of condition after επειepei (since if they really did perfect) with the conclusion of the second-class condition (ανan and the aorist middle indicative of παυομαιpauomai).

To be offered (προσπερομεναιprospheromenai). Regular idiom, participle (present passive) with παυομαιpauomai (Acts 5:42).

Because
(δια τοdia to). ΔιαDia with the accusative of the articular infinitive, “because of the having” (εχεινechein) as to the worshippers (τους λατρευονταςtous latreuontas accusative of general reference of the articular participle), not “would have had.”

No more conscience of sins
(μηδεμιαν ετι συνειδησιν αμαρτιωνmēdemian eti suneidēsin hamartiōn). Rather “consciousness of sins” as in Hebrews 9:14.

Having been once cleansed
(απαχ κεκαταρισμενουςhapax kekatharismenous). Perfect passive participle of καταριζωkatharizō “if they had once for all been cleansed.”

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The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)
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Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on Hebrews 10:2". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/hebrews-10.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Vincent's Word Studies

To be offered ( προσφερόμεναι )

The present participle brings out more forcibly the continuous repetition: “Ceased being offered.”

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Vincent, Marvin R. DD. "Commentary on Hebrews 10:2". "Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/vnt/hebrews-10.html. Charles Schribner's Sons. New York, USA. 1887.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

For then would they not have ceased to be offered? because that the worshippers once purged should have had no more conscience of sins.

They who had been once perfectly purged, would have been no longer conscious either of the guilt or power of their sins.

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Wesley, John. "Commentary on Hebrews 10:2". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/hebrews-10.html. 1765.

Scofield's Reference Notes

sins

Sin. (See Scofield "Romans 3:23").

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Scofield, C. I. "Scofield Reference Notes on Hebrews 10:2". "Scofield Reference Notes (1917 Edition)". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/srn/hebrews-10.html. 1917.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

2 For then would they not have ceased to be offered? because that the worshippers once purged should have had no more conscience of sins.

Ver. 2. No more conscience of sin] Christ, though he took not away death, yet he did the sting of death; so though he took not away sin, yet he did the guilt of sin.

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on Hebrews 10:2". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/hebrews-10.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Hebrews 10:2. For then would they not have ceased to be offered? Many copies read this without the interrogation, For then they would have ceased to be offered. The sense is the same; but the true reading seems to be with the interrogation. The reasoning of the apostle here is this: "If the yearly sacrifices could make men perfect, there could be no occasion for such continual repetition of them: for if menwere once entitled to perfection, the yearly repetition of that which gave them their title, would do nomore than what was done already; namely, give them a title to perfection,—just like baptism among Christians. A man baptized is initiated into the visible church of Christ; and were this rite to be repeated every day or every year, it would still be no more than aninitiatory rite. Just so the yearly atonement would have given men a title to a state of perfection, had it been designed for such a purpose, which indeed was impossible; but as it was instituted only to procure the good things of this world, which annually are given by God, (except as it prefigured and pointed at Christ, holiness, and heaven,) there was a necessity that those sacrifices should be annually repeated; whereas, could the law have given perfection, one oblation had been sufficient for that." The next verse is rendered very plainly thus: But in them [in those sacrifices] there is a yearly commemoration of sins. See Leviticus 16:21.

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Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Hebrews 10:2". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/hebrews-10.html. 1801-1803.

Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary

2.] For (if it were so, if the law were able to perfect the worshippers) would they ( αἱ αὐταὶ θυσίαι) not have ceased being offered, on account of the worshippers (the servers in the service of the tabernacle, used here in a wide sense, including priests and people) having no longer any conscience of sins (for construction, see reff.: = guilt of sin on the conscience, consciousness of the guilt of sin), if once (for all) purified?

That this sentence is to be read ἐπεὶ οὐκ ἄν, and as a question, is pretty universally agreed.

Some, as Thdrt. (apparently: διὰ τοῦτο τέλος ἐκεῖνα λαμβάνει), D-lat. (“nam nec cessassent offerri”), Beza (edd. 1, 2, “alioqui non desiissent offerri”), Whitby, Valcknaer, read οὐκ, and yet no question; understanding, “for then they would not have ceased to be offered,” viz. on the coming in of the N. T. dispensation. But this is surely hardly worth refutation. The rec. not reading οὐκ, might indeed be well thus rendered, “for in that case they would have ceased to be offered.” But then ἀλλά comes in awkwardly, which, when as here without any emphasis, more naturally follows a negative sentence. The taking our verse interrogatively is as old as Œc.: ἐπεὶ οὐκ ἂν ἐπαύσαντο κατʼ ἐρώτησιν ἀνάγνωθι. So also Thl.

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Alford, Henry. "Commentary on Hebrews 10:2". Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hac/hebrews-10.html. 1863-1878.

Heinrich Meyer's Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament

Hebrews 10:2. Proof for the κατʼ ἐνιαυτὸν ταῖς αὐτ. θυσ. οὐδέποτε δύναται τοὺς προσερχομένους τελειῶσαι in the form of a question: for otherwise would not their presentation have ceased? because the worshippers, so soon as they have once been really purged from sin, have no more consciousness of sins, and thus no more need of an expiatory sacrifice. In connection with the Recepta ἐπεὶ ἂν ἐπαύσαντο, the sense itself would remain unchanged, only the words would then have to be taken as an assertory statement (“for their presentation would have come to an end, because,” etc.); by which, however, the discourse would suffer in point of vivacity (observe also the ἀλλά, Hebrews 10:3, corresponding to the question of Hebrews 10:2). But the process is not a natural one, when Beza, edd. 1 and 2, Wetstein, Matthaei, Stein, and others (comp. already Theodoret) will have the proposition of Hebrews 10:2 regarded as an assertory statement, even with the retention of the οὐκ. They then explain either (and thus ordinarily): for otherwise their presentation would not have ceased, sc. by the coming in of the New Covenant (Beza: alioqui non desiissent offerri; Matthaei: non cessavissent, non sublata essent; comp. Theodoret: διὰ τοῦτο τέλος ἐκεῖνα λαμβάνει, ὡς οὐ δυνάμενα συνείδησιν καθαρὰν ἀποφῆναι), or, in that ἐπεὶπροσφερόμεναι, is closely attached to the main verb of Hebrews 10:1, and διὰ τὸ μηδεμίαν κ. τ. λ. is regarded as belonging to the whole proposition, Hebrews 10:1-2 : the law was not able by its sacrifices to lead to perfection, since their presentation was an endless one; because those who are once purified have no longer any consciousness of sins. So Wetstein, who, however, will write—what in that case, no doubt, would be necessary and perfectly justified

οὐκ ἀνεπαύσαντο instead of οὐκ ἂν ἐπαύσαντο (… “quum non cessarent offerri. Ita quidem, ut haec verba, sublata distinctione majori, jungantur iis, quae praecedunt, deinde sequatur totius sententiae confirmatio: quia sacrificantes,” etc.). But against the last-mentioned mode of explanation it is decisive, that the relation of the members of the sentence to each other would become obscure, and the arrangement cumbrous; against the first-mentioned, the presupposition, underlying the ἃς προσφέρουσιν εἰς τὸ διηνεκές, Hebrews 10:1, as well as the epistle in general (Hebrews 9:9, al.), that the Jewish sacrificial ritual was still in continuance at the time of our author’s writing.

ἐπαύσαντο προσφερόμεναι] sc. αἱ θυσίαι. The construction of παύεσθαι, with the participle is the ordinary one, in classic as well as in Hellenistic Greek. Comp. Ephesians 1:16; Colossians 1:9; Acts 5:42, al.; Hermann, ad Viger. p. 771; Winer, Gramm., 7 Aufl. p. 323 f.

τοὺς λατρεύοντας] see at Hebrews 9:9.

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Meyer, Heinrich. "Commentary on Hebrews 10:2". Heinrich Meyer's Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hmc/hebrews-10.html. 1832.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

Hebrews 10:2. ἐπεὶ) So, altogether, ἐπεὶ, with an interrogation, in ch. Hebrews 9:17, note.

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Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on Hebrews 10:2". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/hebrews-10.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

For then would they not have ceased to be offered? for proves the weakness of that shadowy service under the law, because it never ceased, which it would if it had perfected its users; and having reached its end, and done that work, have ceased; for these sacrifices would not of right have been repeated, neither needed they, if they could have justified and sanctified souls for ever.

Because that the worshippers once purged should have had no more conscience of sins: for then this effect would have followed, the worshippers who were to be atoned for or expiated by these sacrifices, if they had perfected them, i.e. pardoned, justified, and acquitted them from guilt of sin and punishment, there would have nothing remained to have troubled, vexed, or tormented their souls, they being no further accused or condemned by their conscience about sin, God having justified and sanctified them, Hebrews 9:14,26,28; compare Romans 5:1,2,11.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Hebrews 10:2". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/hebrews-10.html. 1685.

Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture

сознания грехов Это слово, переведенное как «совесть» в ст. 22; 9:9; 13:18. См. пояснение к 9:9. Если бы грех действительно был преодолен системой жертвоприношений, то совесть ветхозаветных верующих была бы чиста от гложущей их вины (ср. ст. 22). При Ветхом Завете не было свободы совести.

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MacLaren, Alexander. "Commentary on Hebrews 10:2". Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mac/hebrews-10.html.

Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible

‘Else would they not have ceased to be offered? because the worshippers, having been once cleansed, would have had no more consciousness of sins.’

And this lack must be true for if they had not been shadows, would they not have accomplished their end? If the worshippers had been truly cleansed, would the sacrifices not have ceased to be offered? Would the worshippers then not have ceased to be conscious of their sins because they had been truly atoned for? The very continuing repetition of the sacrifices, revealing a continuing consciousness of sin, also revealed the failure of their offerings and sacrifices to deal with sin. The necessity for continuing repairs is an evidence of continuing failure.

We should especially note here a very important point. What the writer has in mind is the final solution. What man needs is not just something to make his daily life possible in spite of his sin, but something which can once-for-all put man in such a state that he can continually approach God without fear for ever, something that can be finally effective.

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Pett, Peter. "Commentary on Hebrews 10:2". "Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible ". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pet/hebrews-10.html. 2013.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

Hebrews 10:2. Else would they—these same sacrifices—not have ceased to be offered, because the worshippers—both priests and people—would have had no longer any conscience—any consciousness of the guilt—of sin being once for all completely purified? The whole clause is best treated as a question, as is clear from the next verse.

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Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on Hebrews 10:2". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/hebrews-10.html. 1879-90.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Then they would have (2) ceased to be offered. That is, if they could have made the worshippers perfect; to wit, in such a manner as the one sacrifice of Christ, who was the Lamb of God that took away the sins of the world, by making a full reparation to the divine justice for the sin of Adam, and of all his offspring. For we must take notice that he compares the sacrifice of Christ, which wrought a general redemption, with the sacrifices of the former law, which could never make any sufficient atonement to the majesty of God offended by sin, and which, by the decree of heaven, were to cease as soon as Christ's sacrifice of a general redemption was made: for then the worshippers would be so cleansed from sin, that they would stand in need of no more, but that the merits and satisfactions of Christ, their Redeemer, should be applied to them according to the order of God's providence; that is, by faith in Christ, by his sacraments, by a true repentance, and the practice of virtue and good works. (Witham) --- If they had been of themselves perfect to all the intents of redemption and remission, as Christ's death is, there would have been no occasion of so often repeating them; as there is no occasion for Christ's dying any more for our sins. (Challoner)

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[BIBLIOGRAPHY]

Alioquin cessassent offerri. In the ordinary Greek copies, Greek: epei an ouk epausanto prospheromenai; but in other manuscripts Greek: ouk is left out.

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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Hebrews 10:2". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/hebrews-10.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

worshippers. App-190.

once. See Hebrews 6:4.

should = would.

had. Omit.

no. Greek. medeis. Literally not (App-105) one.

conscience of sins. i.e. of unpardoned sins.

conscience. See Hebrews 9:14.

sins. Greek. hamartia. App-128.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Hebrews 10:2". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/hebrews-10.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

For then would they not have ceased to be offered? because that the worshippers once purged should have had no more conscience of sins.

For - if the law could have perfected the worshippers.

They - the sacrifices.

Once purged - IF once for all cleansed (Hebrews 7:27).

Conscience - consciousness of sins (Hebrews 9:9).

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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Hebrews 10:2". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/hebrews-10.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(2) For then.—Better, otherwise. The very repetition of the annual ceremonial was a testimony to its imperfection. The idea of repetition has been very strikingly brought out in Hebrews 10:1.

Once purged.—Better, because the worshippers, having been once cleansed, would have no more consciousness of sins. “Worshippers,” not the same word as in Hebrews 10:1, but similarly used in Hebrews 9:9; Hebrews 9:14; Hebrews 12:28 (Philippians 3:3, et al.): in Hebrews 8:5; Hebrews 13:10, it is applied to priestly service.

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Bibliographical Information
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Hebrews 10:2". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/hebrews-10.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

For then would they not have ceased to be offered? because that the worshippers once purged should have had no more conscience of sins.
would they not have
or, they would have. once.
17; 9:13,14; Psalms 103:12; Isaiah 43:25; 44:22; Micah 7:19
conscience
Our translators use the word conscience here, as elsewhere, for consciousness.
Reciprocal: Leviticus 16:30 - GeneralHebrews 10:18 - General

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Hebrews 10:2". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/hebrews-10.html.

E.M. Zerr's Commentary on Selected Books of the New Testament

Had those sacrifices been complete (of themselves or by their own virtue) they would have ceased to be offered. When a devoted Hebrews - brew nation had made one full program of atonement for sin, it would have been permanent and would not have to be repeated. Such a conclusion is logical, and it should have convinced the Judaizers that something was to come in the place of those institutions.

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Zerr, E.M. "Commentary on Hebrews 10:2". E.M. Zerr's Commentary on Selected Books of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/znt/hebrews-10.html. 1952.

Haldane's Exposition on the Epistle to the Romans and Hebrews

For then would they not have ceased to be offered? because that the worshippers once purged should have had no more conscience of sins.

Here the reason is given why the legal sacrifices could not make the worshippers perfect. Had they done Song of Solomon, they would have ceased to be offered. Some copies omit the word not, thus rendering it a positive affirmation. The meaning is precisely the same.

For the worshippers...—Had the legal sacrifices really cancelled guilt, there would have been no need of their repetition; for the worshippers being once purified, would have had no longer a consciousness of guilt; their hearts would have been sprinkled from an evil conscience, ver22; and they would have had boldness in approaching their heavenly Father.

It may he alleged, that since men do not cease from sin, that, although their guilt had been removed, fresh guilt would have been contracted, which, notwithstanding the efficacy of the sacrifice by which their guilt had been removed, would have required a fresh sacrifice; but this is fallacious, and that it is so is proved by matter of fact. The blood of Jesus cleanses the believer from all sin. It gives him the answer of a good conscience. Christ was delivered for our sins, and raised again for our justification. The believer can therefore say, "It is God that justifieth; who is he that condemned?" He can plead a full remission of his sins through the blood of Jesus. They are all buried in his grave, and shall never appear against him. There is a fountain opened in Zion for sin and uncleanness, to which we have daily recourse. By one offering Christ hath perfected for ever them that are sanctified. This is illustrated in what follows.

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Haldane, Robert. "Commentary on Hebrews 10:2". "Haldane's Exposition on the Epistle to the Romans and Hebrews". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hal/hebrews-10.html. 1835.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

2.Ceased to be offered—Had the law been able by a finished act, once for all, as Christ has performed, to finish men for glory, the continuity of the sacrifices would have been unnecessary. Their very continuous repetition, therefore, is the very demonstration of their inferiority.

 

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Hebrews 10:2". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/hebrews-10.html. 1874-1909.

The Bible Study New Testament

2. Had been made really clean. “The fact that they continued to feel both guilt and fear of punishment shows they were not really made clean from their sins. When guilt and fear are removed by the sacrifice, it has no need to be repeated.”

 

 

 

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Bibliographical Information
Ice, Rhoderick D. "Commentary on Hebrews 10:2". "The Bible Study New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ice/hebrews-10.html. College Press, Joplin, MO. 1974.