Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Isaiah 13:9

Behold, the day of the Lord is coming, Cruel, with fury and burning anger, To make the land a desolation; And He will exterminate its sinners from it.
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Anger;   Day;   War;   Wicked (People);   Thompson Chain Reference - Desolation;   The Topic Concordance - Day of the Lord;   Earthquakes;   Heaven/the Heavens;   Humbleness;   Iniquity;   Pride/arrogance;   Punishment;   Sin;   Wickedness;   World;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Anger of God, the;   Babylon;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Babylon;   Isaiah;   Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Babylon;   Day of the lord;   Stars;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Mark, Theology of;   Easton Bible Dictionary - Darkness;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Day of the Lord;   Isaiah;   Judgment Day;   Wrath, Wrath of God;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Isaiah, Book of;   Kingdom of God;   Peter, Second Epistle of;   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Babylon ;   Thessalonians, Epistles to the;   The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Medes;   Rebels;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Babylon;   Messiah;   Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Division of the Earth;  
Encyclopedias:
Condensed Biblical Cyclopedia - Kingdom of Judah;   International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Cruel;   Day of the Lord (Yahweh);   Isaiah;   Joel (2);   The Jewish Encyclopedia - Eschatology;  
Devotionals:
Every Day Light - Devotion for February 20;  

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

The day of the Lord cometh - See Isaiah 13:6.

Cruel - (אכזרי 'akezārı̂y ). This does not mean that “God” is cruel, but that the ‹day of Yahweh‘ that was coming should be unsparing and destructive to them. It would be the exhibition of “justice,” but not of “cruelty;” and the word stands opposed here to mercy, and means that God would not spare them. The effect would be that the inhabitants of Babylon would be destroyed.

Fierce anger - Hebrew, (חרון אף 'aph chărôn ) ‹A glow, or burning of anger.‘ The phrase denotes the most intense indignation (compare Numbers 25:4; Numbers 32:14; 1 Samuel 28:18).

To lay the land desolate - Chaldea, Isaiah 13:5.

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Bibliographical Information
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Isaiah 13:9". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/isaiah-13.html. 1870.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

"Behold the day of Jehovah cometh, cruel, with wrath and fierce anger; to make the land a desolation, and to destroy the sinners thereof out of it. For the stars of heaven and the constellations thereof shall not give their light; and the sun shall be darkened in its going forth, and the moon shall not cause its light to shine. And I will punish the world for their evil, and the wicked for their iniquity: and I will cause the arrogance of the proud to cease, and will lay low the haughtiness of the terrible."

Some have failed to see the eschatological impact of this passage, but Kidner properly understood it:

"While Babylon is the focal point of this chapter, it stands for something much bigger than itself, since the ambiguous word "earth" (Isaiah 13:5,9) (`land' in KJV) gives place to `world' in Isaiah 13:11, in a setting of cosmic upheaval such as the New Testament uses to depict the last days (See Matthew 24:29; Revelation 6:12,13). Babylon here is the city of man, not of one nation."[10]

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Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
Bibliographical Information
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Isaiah 13:9". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/isaiah-13.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Behold, the day of the Lord cometh,.... Or "is come"F5בא "venit", Piscator; "veniens", Montanus. ; said in Isaiah 13:6 to be at hand, but now it is represented in prophecy as already come:

cruel both with wrath and fierce anger; which, whether referred to "the Lord", or to "the day", the sense is the same; the day may be said to be cruel, and full of wrath and fury, because of the severity and fierceness of the Lord's anger, exercised upon the Babylonians in it; and he may be said to be so, not that he really is cruel, or exceeds the bounds of justice, but because he seemed to be so to the objects of his displeasure; as a judge may be thought to be cruel and severe by the malefactor, when he only pronounces and executes a righteous judgment on him; a heap of words are here made use of, to express the greatness and fierceness of divine wrath:

to lay the land desolate; the land of the Chaldeans:

and he shall destroy the sinners thereof out of it; this shows that what is before said most properly belongs to the Lord, to whom the destruction of Babylon, and the country belonging to it, must be ascribed; and indeed it was such as could not be brought about by human force; the moving cause of which was the sin of the inhabitants, some of whom were notorious sinners, for whose sakes it was destroyed by the Lord, and they in the midst of it, or out of it; see Psalm 104:35.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Isaiah 13:9". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/isaiah-13.html. 1999.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

cruel — not strictly, but unsparingly just; opposed to mercy. Also answering to the cruelty (in the strict sense) of Babylon towards others (Isaiah 14:17) now about to be visited on itself.

the land — “the earth” [Horsley]. The language of Isaiah 13:9-13 can only primarily and partially apply to Babylon; fully and exhaustively, the judgments to come, hereafter, on the whole earth. Compare Isaiah 13:10 with Matthew 24:29; Revelation 8:12. The sins of Babylon, arrogancy (Isaiah 13:11; Isaiah 14:11; Isaiah 47:7, Isaiah 47:8), cruelty, false worship (Jeremiah 50:38), persecution of the people of God (Isaiah 47:6), are peculiarly characteristic of the Antichristian world of the latter days (Daniel 11:32-37; Revelation 17:3, Revelation 17:6; Revelation 18:6, Revelation 18:7, Revelation 18:9-14, Revelation 18:24).

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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Isaiah 13:9". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/isaiah-13.html. 1871-8.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

Behold, the day of the LORD cometh, cruel both with wrath and fierce anger, to lay the land desolate: and he shall destroy the sinners thereof out of it.

Behold — Divers words are heaped together, to signify the extremity of his anger.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
Bibliographical Information
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Isaiah 13:9". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/isaiah-13.html. 1765.

Scofield's Reference Notes

Day of the Lord

(Day of Jehovah) vs.

Isaiah 2:10-22; Isaiah 4:1-6; Isaiah 11:10-13; Isaiah 13:9-16; Isaiah 24:21-23; Isaiah 26:20; Isaiah 26:21; Isaiah 63:1-6; Isaiah 66:15-24; Revelation 19:11-21.

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These files are considered public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available in the Online Bible Software Library.
Bibliographical Information
Scofield, C. I. "Scofield Reference Notes on Isaiah 13:9". "Scofield Reference Notes (1917 Edition)". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/srn/isaiah-13.html. 1917.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Isaiah 13:9 Behold, the day of the LORD cometh, cruel both with wrath and fierce anger, to lay the land desolate: and he shall destroy the sinners thereof out of it.

Ver. 9. Behold the day of the Lord cometh cruel.] So it shall seem to the enemies, because "an evil, an only evil, behold, is come," [Ezekiel 7:5] without mixture of mercy.

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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Isaiah 13:9". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/isaiah-13.html. 1865-1868.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Cruel both with wrath and fierce anger; divers words are heaped together, to signify the extremity of his anger.

The sinners thereof; the inhabitants of that city, who were guilty of so much idolatry and cruelty, and all sorts of luxury.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Isaiah 13:9". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/isaiah-13.html. 1685.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Desolate. This was effected in the course of many centuries. (Calmet) --- The building of Seleucia caused Babylon to be deserted. (Pliny, [Natural History?] vi. 27.) --- Hence we know not at present where it was situated.

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Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Isaiah 13:9". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/isaiah-13.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

cruel = stern.

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Bibliographical Information
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Isaiah 13:9". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/isaiah-13.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

Behold, the day of the LORD cometh, cruel both with wrath and fierce anger, to lay the land desolate: and he shall destroy the sinners thereof out of it.

The day of the Lord cometh, cruel - not strictly, but unsparingly just; opposed to mercy. Also answering, by just retribution in kind, to the cruelty (in the strict sense) of Babylon toward others (Isaiah 14:17), now about to be visited on itself.

To lay the land desolate - `the earth' (Horsley). The language from Isaiah 13:9 to Isaiah 13:13 can only primarily and partially apply to Babylon; fully and exhaustively, the judgments to come hereafter on the whole earth. Compare Isaiah 13:10 with Matthew 24:29; Revelation 8:12. The sins of Babylon, arrogancy (Isaiah 13:11; Isaiah 14:11; Isaiah 47:7-8), cruelty (Isaiah 14:17), false worship (Jeremiah 50:38), persecution of the people of God (Isaiah 47:6), are peculiarly characteristic of the apostate Church-mystical "Babylon the great," "drunken with the blood of the saints and martyrs of Jesus," and the Antichristian world of the latter days (Daniel 11:32-37; Revelation 17:3; Revelation 17:6; Revelation 18:6-7; Revelation 18:9-14; Revelation 18:24).

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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Isaiah 13:9". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/isaiah-13.html. 1871-8.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Behold, the day of the LORD cometh, cruel both with wrath and fierce anger, to lay the land desolate: and he shall destroy the sinners thereof out of it.
cruel
15-18; 47:10-15; Jeremiah 6:22,23; 50:40-42; 51:35-58; Nahum 1:2,6; Malachi 4:1; Revelation 17:16,17; 18:8; 19:17-21
he shall
Psalms 104:35; Proverbs 2:22
Reciprocal: Judges 20:41 - were amazed;  Isaiah 2:12 - the day;  Isaiah 13:6 - for the day;  Ezekiel 13:5 - the day;  Joel 2:31 - sun;  Zechariah 14:1 - GeneralActs 2:20 - sun;  Revelation 6:12 - the sun

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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Isaiah 13:9". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/isaiah-13.html.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

9.Behold the day of the Lord will come cruel. He repeats what he had slightly noticed a little before, that though the inhabitants of Babylon are now at ease, and rely on their wealth, the day of the Lord is at hand, to terrify those who are at ease.

But a question might here be raised, Why is the day of the Lord called cruel, since nothing is more desirable than to have God present with us; for his presence alone makes us truly happy? I answer, we ought always to consider who they are that are addressed by the Prophet; for it is customary with the prophets to give various descriptions of God corresponding to the diversity of the hearers. In like manner, David also declares that God is

merciful to the merciful, and cruel and severe to the ungodly. (Psalms 18:25.)

What could wicked men imagine to be in God but the utmost severity? And therefore the slightest mention of God fills them with terror.

The godly, on the other hand, whenever the name of God is mentioned, derive the greatest delight and joy from hearing it; so that nothing can be more highly gratifying. Thus, when the prophets address the godly, as soon as they have mentioned God, they speak of joy and gladness, because the godly will feel that he is gracious and merciful to them; but when they address the ungodly, they hold out the judgment of God, and speak of grief and mourning. As the godly are cheered by the presence of God, because by faith they behold his goodness; so the ungodly are terrified, because the testimony of their conscience reproves and convinces them that he comes as a severe Judge. Since even hypocrites pretend that they eagerly long for the day of the Lord, and boast that he will assist them, the prophets tear off from them this disguise, and show that to them the day of the Lord will be dreadful and alarming. (Amos 5:18.)

Isaiah applies the usual description to this prophecy, in order to show more fully how much we ought to dread the wrath of God; for, being by nature slow, or rather stupid, we would not be powerfully affected if the Lord spoke in plain terms about his judgments. Since, therefore, an unadorned style would be too cold, he contrived new modes of expression, that by means of them he might shake off our sluggishness. When he says, and he shall destroy the sinners thereof out of it, he means by sinners not all men without distinction, but the ungodly and wicked men who inhabited Babylon.

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Calvin, John. "Commentary on Isaiah 13:9". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/isaiah-13.html. 1840-57.