Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Jeremiah 38:28

So Jeremiah stayed in the court of the guardhouse until the day that Jerusalem was captured.
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Prisoners;   Zedekiah;  
Dictionaries:
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Jeremiah;   Zedekiah;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Court of the Prison;   Prison, Prisoners;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Greek Versions of Ot;   Jeremiah;   Zedekiah,;  

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

And he was there when … - These words are altered by some to “and it came to pass when” etc., and taken to form the opening of Jeremiah 39.

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Jeremiah 38:28". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/jeremiah-38.html. 1870.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

So Jeremiah abode in the court of the prison,.... Where he was ordered to be by the king, before he was cast into the dungeon, and where he was replaced by Ebedmelech; and which was now confirmed by the king, and here he continued:

until the day that Jerusalem was taken; but how long it was from his conversation with the king, to the taking of the city, is not certain:

and he was there when Jerusalem was taken; as appears from Jeremiah 39:14. Kimchi connects this with the beginning of the next chapter; and so the Targum, rendering it,

"and it came to pass when Jerusalem was taken;'

namely, what is related in the following chapter.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Jeremiah 38:28". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/jeremiah-38.html. 1999.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

he was there when Jerusalem was taken — These words are made the beginning of the thirty-ninth chapter by many; but the accents and sense support English Version.

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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Jeremiah 38:28". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/jeremiah-38.html. 1871-8.

Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary

REFLECTIONS

READER! we peruse this portion of God's holy word to little purpose, if so be that we do not, under his divine teaching, gather from it the blessed instructions it holds forth. For what is it that we behold in the different characters then, but the same as we behold in the different characters now; that the Lord's children are conformed to his lovely image; and the children of the evil one to Satan their master. Their malice is against Christ and therefore it is manifested to his people. As then saith an Apostle, speaking of the days of old, he that was born after the flesh persecuted him that was born after the spirit, even so it is now. And so it will go on, until time shall be no more. And then the Lord will come, and take out of his kingdom all things that offend. Blessed Lord Jesus! I would say both for myself and Reader; give us to know, and see clearly, the marks of our adoption character. Let our souls discover, that our spots are the spots of God's children. And then, like Paul, like Jeremiah, like all the faithful gone before, we shall be enabled to say, though bonds and imprisonment await us, yet none of these things will move us; neither shall we count our life dear to ourselves so that we finish our course with joy, and the calling we have received of the Lord Jesus to testify the gospel of the grace of God.

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Hawker, Robert, D.D. "Commentary on Jeremiah 38:28". "Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pmc/jeremiah-38.html. 1828.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Jeremiah 38:28 So Jeremiah abode in the court of the prison until the day that Jerusalem was taken: and he was [there] when Jerusalem was taken.

Ver. 28. So Jeremiah abode in the court of the prison.] Which now God had made to him a sanctuary of safety, and a very Bethlehem, or house of bread. God can easily turn a prison into a paradise, and brown bread and water into manchet and wine, as he did to the martyrs. One of them dated his letter thus, From the delectable orchard of the Leonine prison.

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on Jeremiah 38:28". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/jeremiah-38.html. 1865-1868.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Thus God hath several ways to hide his people in an evil day; he hid Josiah from it in the grave; he hid Noah in an ark, Lot in Zoar, Jeremiah in a prison, which in probability was a safer place for him than the land of Benjamin, whither he would have gone had not Irijah stopped him, Jeremiah 37:12,13. Conquerors have commonly the greatest kindness for those whom they find under the frowns of the conquered, especially when that which hath made them so hath been something spoken or done in the favour of the conquerors.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Jeremiah 38:28". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/jeremiah-38.html. 1685.

Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable

Zedekiah kept his word to Jeremiah, who was able to stay in the court of the guardhouse until the city fell to the Babylonians.

"Nothing is more marked throughout all this story than the absolute and unswerving loyalty of Jeremiah to the message of judgment which he was called on to deliver." [Note: Morgan, p334.]

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Constable, Thomas. DD. "Commentary on Jeremiah 38:28". "Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dcc/jeremiah-38.html. 2012.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

abode. See the note on Jeremiah 37:16. further date: viz. "in the tenth day of the month".

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Jeremiah 38:28". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/jeremiah-38.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

So Jeremiah abode in the court of the prison until the day that Jerusalem was taken: and he was there when Jerusalem was taken.

He was [there] when Jerusalem was taken. These words are made the beginning of Jeremiah 39:1-18 by many; but the accents and sense support the English version.

Remarks:

(1) The prophet who risked character, liberty, and life in telling the salutary though unwelcome truth to his countrymen, that submission to the King of Babylon was the only way of safety, was condemned to a miry, dark, and loathsome dungeon, as though he sought not the welfare, but the hurt of the state (Jeremiah 38:4). How infatuated are sinners who mistake for enemies those who are their truest friends! The wicked are their own worst enemies so long as they are impenitent, and, therefore, they regard the servants of God as enemies because they tell them so. Until they submit their proud spirits to God's appointed and only way of salvation, there is nothing but destruction before them. The faithful minister tells them this wholesome though mortifying truth, and therefore they hate him. Yet if they would reflect a moment, they would see that, like Jeremiah, the true servant of God can have no selfish aim in telling them unpalatable truth, but can only be influenced by a sincere desire for their salvation: and that their true wisdom and happiness would be to accept salvation, while yet there is time, in God's appointed way. (2) Kingly power and state are eagerly coveted; yet the sovereign is often such only in title: he is in the hands of his princes and ministers. But this does not excuse the monarch who, like Zedekiah, through weakness and pusillanimity, suffers himself to be tempted, by pressure from without, into sanctioning an act of cruelty and injustice, such as was that perpetrated by the princes upon Jeremiah. State necessity and temporizing expediency are not pleas that will stand before Him who ought to have been feared and obeyed rather than man. Pontius Pilate in vain tried by such pleas to wash himself of the guilt of condemning the Holy and the Just One: but to all ages his name shall be handed down to infamy, as it has been for eighteen hundred years past in the Creeds and Confessions of the Church, as the unjust judge under whom the innocent Saviour suffered

(3) At a time when the wrath of the princes was much to be feared, and just after that the king himself yielded to their wishes, one was found who, with fearless magnanimity, faith, and love, braved every danger, in order to rescue the servant of God from certain death (Jeremiah 38:7-10). Ebed-melech, an Ethiopian Gentile, did that which none of Jeremiah's own Jewish countrymen attempted in his behalf, Often God raises up friends to His people from quarters whence least they could expect it. And Ebed-melech's courageous interference in behalf of Jeremiah not only brought deliverance to the prophet, but to himself also subsequently (Jeremiah 39:16). None ever loses by being bold for God. It is true, Jeremiah, like his Antitype, Christ, as the immediate result of his faithfulness, sank for a time in the deep mire (Psalms 69:2); but his God was only trying his faith, and when it was tried enough, brought him forth, as gold from the fiery trial, purified of its dross. While Ebed-melech's boldness in risking his life for God's prophet at that time was the cause of his life being saved ultimately at the time when the enemies of Jeremiah and of God were given to destruction, let us remember and act on the promise, "Whosoever shall give to drink unto one of these little ones a cup of cold water only in the name of a disciple, shall in nowise lose his reward" (Matthew 10:42).

(4) God can use the most despised instrumentalities for effecting the deliverance of His servants, even as "old cast clouts, and old rotten rags" were made means in the deliverance of Jeremiah from the miry pit (Jeremiah 38:11-13). So in delivering the prisoners of Satan from the pit to which sin has doomed them from their birth, God hath "chosen the foolish things of the world to confound the wise, and the weak things of the world to confound the things which are mighty, and base things of the world, and things which are despised, and things which are not, to bring to nought things that are" (1 Corinthians 1:27).

(5) Zedekiah was offered safety by the imprisoned prophet, in the name of the Lord, if he would go for th and submit to the King of Babylon: if he would not, the alternative was destruction to the city by fire, and mutilation of his eyes, with captivity to himself. But he feared that, if he surrendered to the Babylonians, he should be mocked by his former Jewish subjects who had deserted to the Chaldeans. He therefore, through fear of man's sneer, set at nought the command of God and the fear of God. In righteous retribution, God brought upon him the very thing he feared, in its most galling form. By not going forth as God had commanded, through fear of the mocking of men, he, his children, and his wives, were delivered into the hands of the Babylonians; he virtually was the cause of the city being burned with fire: and the very women of his own palace, once the slaves of his will, were loudest and most bitter in their jeers at him, as a fool led into his present plight by the so-called "friends" and princes, whose puppet he was, and as one "sunk in the mire, in just retribution for his having, in his guilty fear of his princes, allowed the prophet to have been "sunk in the mire" (cf. Jeremiah 38:22-23 with Jeremiah 38:6). Let us remember, in times of fear and perplexity, the safest way in the end is that which is suggested by the fear of God rather than the fear of man.

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Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Jeremiah 38:28". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/jeremiah-38.html. 1871-8.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

So Jeremiah abode in the court of the prison until the day that Jerusalem was taken: and he was there when Jerusalem was taken.
13; 15:20,21; 37:21; 39:14; Psalms 23:4; 2 Timothy 3:11; 4:17,18 Reciprocal: 2 Kings 24:19 - And he did;  Jeremiah 29:26 - that thou;  Jeremiah 33:1 - he;  Jeremiah 36:5 - GeneralLamentations 3:59 - thou hast;  Hebrews 11:36 - bonds

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These files are public domain.
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Bibliographical Information
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Jeremiah 38:28". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/jeremiah-38.html.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

Some render the last words simply thus, “And it happened that Jerusalem was taken;” and others, “It happened accordingly that Jerusalem was taken;but this seems unnatural. Others take the relative as a demonstrative pronoun, and of this I approve, “For it happened that according to this Jerusalem was taken.”

He first says that he dwelt in the court of the prison. It hence appears that he was not even then at liberty; for though the king wished him to be free, yet he dared not to release him. This is one thing. Then he says, that he was there until the day the city was taken We shall hereafter see that he was saved by the king’s command, and was brought out of prison. He was, then, until that day in the court of the prison, as though he had said, that he was a prisoner until the king was taken prisoner, together with his counselors, and also until the day the whole city was taken. And here we may see, as in a vivid form, the wonderful judgment of God. As long as the Jews boasted that they offered sacrifices to God, they kept Jeremiah shut up in prison, so that he was not a free man until the king was taken, the city perished, and almost all were driven into exile. I have no doubt but that he added the following by way of explanation, And it happened that according to this Jerusalem was taken; that is, he reminds readers in these words, that he had not been a false Prophet, but a true and faithful witness as to God’s judgment, for all his prophecies were verified by the event. (116) He then says that the city was taken, not by chance, but because God had so declared. He now begins to narrate historically the destruction and the burning of the city. He therefore says, —

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Calvin, John. "Commentary on Jeremiah 38:28". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/jeremiah-38.html. 1840-57.