Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Job 17:8

"The upright will be appalled at this, And the innocent will stir up himself against the godless.
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Afflictions and Adversities;   Hypocrisy;  
Dictionaries:
Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Greatness of God;   Hypocrisy;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Obsolete or obscure words in the english av bible;  
Encyclopedias:
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Godless;   Hypocrisy;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

Upright men shall be astonied - In several of these verses Job is supposed to speak prophetically of his future restoration, and of the good which religious society should derive from the history of his original affluence, consequent poverty and affliction, and final restoration to health, peace, and prosperity. The upright will receive the account with astonishment, and wonder at the dispensations of the Almighty; while hypocrites, false professors and the sour-headed, godly, shall be unmasked, and innocent men, whether in affliction or affluence, shall be known to be favourites of the Almighty.

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Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Job 17:8". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/job-17.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Upright men shall be astonished at this - At the course of events in regard to me. They will be amazed that God has suffered a holy man to be plunged into such calamities, and to be treated in this manner by his friends. The fact at which he supposes they would be so much astonished was, that the good were afflicted in this manner, and that no relief was furnished.

And the innocent shall stir up himself - Shall rouse himself, or assume vigor to resist the wicked.

The hypocrite - The wicked - alluding probably to his professed friends. The idea of hypocrisy which the sentence conveys arises from the fact, that they professed to be “his” friends, and had proved to be false; and that they had professed to be the friends of God, and yet had uttered sentiments inconsistent with any right views of him. He now says, that that could not go unnoticed. The world would be aroused at so remarkable a state of things, and a just public indignation would be the result.

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Job 17:8". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/job-17.html. 1870.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Upright men shall be astonished at this,.... Such as were upright in heart, and in their walk conversation, sincere and honourable in their profession of religion, these would be amazed at the afflictions of Job, and the unkindness of his friends; it is hereby suggested, that it would be then, and in ages to come, a matter of surprise to truly gracious persons, when they should hear of such sore afflictions laid upon so good a man, and he told what censures, calumnies, and reproaches, were cast upon him by his friends; this would be so astonishing, that they would not know how to believe it, and still more at a loss how to account for it, that such things should be permitted in Providence, there being reason to believe the truth of them:

and the innocent shall stir up himself against the hypocrite; that is, such, who though they are not free from sin, yet live holy and harmless lives and conversations among men, so that they are not chargeable with any gross iniquity, or what is scandalous and unbecoming their character; these shall rise up with indignation against such persons as pretend to a great deal of sanctify and devotion, and yet have no charity or love to an afflicted saint, but censure and reproach him, and add affliction to his affliction. Thus Job retorts the charge of hypocrisy his friends brought against him upon them; for he seems tacitly to design them, and delivers these words as a kind of solace to himself; that though he was thus used by them at that time, yet good men in future time would have different apprehensions of him, and rise up and vindicate his name and character.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Job 17:8". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/job-17.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

Upright [men] shall be astonied at i this, and the innocent shall stir up himself against the hypocrite.

(i) That is, when they see the godly punished: but in the end they will come to understanding and know what will be the reward of the hypocrite.
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Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Job 17:8". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/job-17.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

astonied — at my unmerited sufferings.

against the hypocrite — The upright shall feel their sense of justice wounded (“will be indignant”) because of the prosperity of the wicked. By “hypocrite” or “ungodly,” he perhaps glances at his false friends.

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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Job 17:8". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/job-17.html. 1871-8.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

Upright men shall be astonied at this, and the innocent shall stir up himself against the hypocrite.

Astonied — At the depth and mysteriousness of God's judgments, which fall on innocent men, while the worst of men prosper.

Yet — Notwithstanding all these sufferings of good men, and the astonishment which they cause, he shall the more zealously oppose those hypocrites, who make these strange providences of God an objection to religion.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
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Wesley, John. "Commentary on Job 17:8". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/job-17.html. 1765.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Job 17:8 Upright [men] shall be astonied at this, and the innocent shall stir up himself against the hypocrite.

Ver. 8. Upright men shall be astonied at this] They shall silently admire and adore the fathomless depth of the divine administration when they see a man so upright to suffer such heavy pressures; yet shall they not censure me as you do, nor condemn me for complaining, since there is a cause. They cannot indeed see far into God’s secret intentions, they do therefore mirari marvel, rather than rimari, examine, like as the old Romans dedicated unto Victory a certain lake, the depth whereof they could not fathom.

And the innocent shall stir up himself against the hypocrite] He shall learn of me not to be baffled out of his sincerity, to be mocked out of his integrity, but to maintain and take comfort therein against all his false accusers. Opposition doth not weaken, but waken, heroic spirits, 2 Samuel 6:21-22. They proceed so much the more vigorously in the ways of holiness; like as lime burns the more for the cold water cast upon it, and as the palm tree, which, although it have many weights at the top, and many snakes at the bottom, yet it stirreth up itself, and flourisheth, taking for its posy, Nec premor, nec perimor. Nothing hurteth or hindereth me.

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on Job 17:8". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/job-17.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Job 17:8. And the innocent shall stir up himself against the hypocrite The innocent, to be sure, will exert himself against the profligate. The whole of this and the next verse is an irony. Heath.

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Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Job 17:8". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/job-17.html. 1801-1803.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Wise and good men, when they shall see and consider my calamities, will not be so forward to censure and condemn me as you are, but will rather stand and wonder at the depth and mysteriousness of God’s counsels and judgments, which fall so heavily upon innocent men, while the worst of men prosper.

And the innocent shall stir up himself against the hypocrite: but, or yet, (notwithstanding all these sufferings of good men and the astonishment which they cause,)

innocent (or religious persons shall be so far from joining their opinions, and counsels, and interests, with

hypocrites, or profane men, who thence take occasion to censure the afflicted person, and to reproach, and condemn, and desert the profession and practice of godliness, that they) will stir up themselves against them in holy indignation, and will oppose their wicked courses, and will prefer afflicted piety before prosperous iniquity.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Job 17:8". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/job-17.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

8.The hypocrite The impure. To the righteous, the permitted sufferings of the just man at the hands of the unjust present a dark feature of the divine economy. The Church in all ages has been baptized with blood. All life of appreciable worth begins and matures through suffering, and the higher spiritual life is not excepted. According to the value of the life is the fierceness of the sorrow that accompanies it into being — a thought that holds good with respect to the highest saints in heaven.

(Revelation 7:13-15.) The divine will that spares not the Son of God, subjects to kindred suffering those in whom he is most deeply interested.

 

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Job 17:8". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/job-17.html. 1874-1909.

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

Job 17:8. Upright men shall be astonied at this — Wise and good men, when they shall see me, and consider my calamities, will not be so forward to censure and condemn me as you are, but will rather stand and wonder at the depth and mysteriousness of God’s judgments, which fall so heavily upon innocent men, while the worst of men prosper. And, or, rather, but, or yet, the innocent shall stir himself up against the hypocrite — Notwithstanding all these sufferings of good men, and the astonishment which they cause, he shall be so far from joining his opinions, counsels, and interest with those profane men, who take occasion from thence to censure afflicted persons, and desert, condemn, and reproach the profession and practice of godliness, that he will the more zealously oppose those hypocrites who make these strange providences of God an objection to religion, and will prefer afflicted piety to prosperous iniquity.

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Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on Job 17:8". Joseph Benson's Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/job-17.html. 1857.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Hypocrite. If you condemn me, I shall comfort myself with the approbation of the righteous, and still maintain my station. (Haydock) --- Men of sense and virtue will tremble at the judgments of God, and will never join the crowd of scoffers. (Calmet)

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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Job 17:8". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/job-17.html. 1859.

Mark Dunagan Commentary on the Bible

Anyone who was upright and innocent would be appalled at such outlandish treatment of Job. Clearly this infers that Job"s friends were not righteous men.

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Dunagan, Mark. "Commentary on Job 17:8". "Mark Dunagan Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dun/job-17.html. 1999-2014.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

Upright men shall be astonied at this, and the innocent shall stir up himself against the hypocrite. Upright men shall be astonied at this, and the innocent shall stir up himself against the hypocrite.

Astonied - at my unmerited sufferings.

Against the hypocrite. The upright shall feel their sense of justice wounded ('will be indignant') because of the prosperity of the wicked (Psalms 37:1-40; Psalms 73:1-28.). By "hypocrite" or "ungodly" he perhaps glances at his false friends.

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Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Job 17:8". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/job-17.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(8) Upright men shall be astonied.—“As a result of the warning my case would give, upright men would be astonished at it, innocent men would be encouraged, and the righteous would persevere and wax bold.”

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Job 17:8". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/job-17.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Upright men shall be astonied at this, and the innocent shall stir up himself against the hypocrite.
astonied
Psalms 73:12-15; Ecclesiastes 5:8; Habakkuk 1:13; Romans 11:33
stir up
34:30; Acts 13:46
Reciprocal: Job 1:8 - upright;  Job 21:5 - be astonished;  Job 33:9 - innocent

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Job 17:8". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/job-17.html.