Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Job 22:1

Then Eliphaz the Temanite responded,
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Eliphaz;   Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Greatness of God;   Hypocrisy;   Easton Bible Dictionary - Temanite;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Teman;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Job, the Book of;   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Eliphaz ;  

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

JOB 22

THE THIRD SPEECH OF ELIPHAZ:

HIS FALSE CHARGES ACCUSING JOB OF SPECIFIC SINS

"The only thing new in this speech of Eliphaz was the list of specific sins he charged him with committing."[1] In this evil speech, "We have the most brutal, the most harsh, and the most unjust words spoken against Job in the whole book."[2] Satan's malicious campaign against Job is about to fail, and this accounts for the increased savagery and injustice of his attacks through his instruments, the alleged friends of Job. Not for one moment can we agree with Blair that, "What Eliphaz said, in the main, was good."[3] How can a Christian writer refer to the malicious lies which Eliphaz uttered against Job's character as `good,' with no evidence or support whatever, except the prompting of his own evil imagination, - how can any of that be `good.'?

"It was one of the unhappinesses of Job, as is the case with many an honest man, to be misunderstood by his friends."[4] "The lamentable fact is that the friends endorsed Satan's view of Job as a hypocrite. Thinking to defend God, they became Satan's advocates, insisting that he (Job) whom God designated as his servant, actually belonged to the devil!"[5]

"The second cycle of these dialogues had practically exhausted all the real arguments."[6] And in the third cycle that begins here, only Eliphaz tried to clinch the discussion by his barrage of shameful sins with which he shamelessly charged Job. Bildad replied with what some have called "a short ode," and Zophar apparently withdrew from the contest.

Job 22:1-3

THE IRRELEVANT PRELUDE TO ELIPHAZ' SPEECH

"Then answered Eliphaz the Temanite, and said,

Can a man be profitable unto God?

Surely he that is wise is profitable unto himself.

Is it any pleasure to the Almighty that thou art righteous?

Or is it gain to him that thou makest thy ways perfect?"

Rawlinson referred to these lines as "irrelevant";[7] but actually, there was a terribly wicked thrust in these words. "Eliphaz here thinks that it is for man's sake alone that God created him,"[8] and that God laid out the rules, which if a man follows them, he shall be happy and prosperous, and that if he does not follow them, illness, misfortune and destruction shall be his portion.

That view expressed here by Eliphaz completely ignores God's love of mankind (John 3:16), the passionate desire of God Himself that man should love his Creator (Mark 12:30), and the joy in heaven over one sinner that repents (Luke 15:7). It is impossible to imagine a more evil proposition than the one Eliphaz advocated here.

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Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
Bibliographical Information
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Job 22:1". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/job-22.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Then Eliphaz the Temanite answered and said. As Eliphaz was the first that entered the discussion with Job, being perhaps the oldest man, and might be reckoned the wisest, so he gives the lead in every course of disputation; and here, instead of replying to Job's arguments and instances, at which he was very angry, betakes himself to calumny and reproach, and to draw invidious consequences, instead of making use of solid reasons for conviction and confutation.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Job 22:1". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/job-22.html. 1999.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

Job 22:1-30. As before, Eliphaz begins.

Eliphaz shows that man‘s goodness does not add to, or man‘s badness take from, the happiness of God; therefore it cannot be that God sends prosperity to some and calamities on others for His own advantage; the cause of the goods and ills sent must lie in the men themselves (Psalm 16:2; Luke 17:10; Acts 17:25; 1 Chronicles 29:14). So Job‘s calamities must arise from guilt. Eliphaz, instead of meeting the facts, tries to show that it could not be so.

Copyright Statement
These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Job 22:1". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/job-22.html. 1871-8.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Job 22:1 Then Eliphaz the Temanite answered and said,

Ver. 1. Then Eliphaz the Temanite answered and said] Abruptly, without any preface, he sets upon Job (as doth likewise Bildad, Job 25:1-6), acting the part of a spiteful caviller rather than of an ingenuous accuser; reckoning and ranking just Job among the wicked, not covertly, as before, but overtly and expressly; and then thinking to salve all by an exhortation to repentance, backed with a fair promise of a full restoration. Pulcherrima parsenesis, sed quid ad Iobum? saith Brentius, A very good exhortation, but ill applied. We shall do well to take notice what a dangerous thing it is to give way to unruly passions, which, like heavy bodies down steep hills, once in motion, move themselves, and know no ground but the bottom.

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Bibliographical Information
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Job 22:1". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/job-22.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

CHAP. XXII.

Eliphaz asserts, that Job's justification of himself doth not please God, and that he is surrounded with snares, because he had been guilty of many iniquities. He exhorts him to repentance, with promises of mercy.

Before Christ 1645.

Job 22:1. Then Eliphaz the Temanite answered Eliphaz here, increasing in his indignation, charges Job home with particular facts of cruelty and oppression; to which he adds the atrocious crime of atheism, and a denial or disbelief of Providence; and this latter he assigns as the reason of Job's obstinacy in refusing to submit and acknowledge his guilt: Job 22:2-14. He compares his wickedness with that of the mighty oppressors of the antediluvian world; with that of the inhabitants of Sodom, and the cities of the plain; intimating not obscurely, that his end would probably be the same as theirs, unless prevented by a speedy submission, and full restitution, Job 22:15-20 to which he therefore earnestly presses him, and endeavours to allure him by placing full in his view the great advantages that he would probably reap from such a conduct: Job 22:21 to the end. Heath.

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Bibliographical Information
Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Job 22:1". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/job-22.html. 1801-1803.

Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary

CONTENTS

In this Chapter Eliphaz brings a new charge against Job, which is the third he brought against him. He perverts Job's reasoning, it should seem, to a very different meaning to what he intended, in delivering his sentiments in the preceding chapter. Eliphaz very severely reproves the Man of Uz in, this: though, towards the conclusion, he gives some sweet counsel.

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Bibliographical Information
Hawker, Robert, D.D. "Commentary on Job 22:1". "Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pmc/job-22.html. 1828.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

The third stage of the controversy.

Chaps. 22-26.

THIRD ADDRESS OF ELIPHAZ.

1.Then Eliphaz’ answered — God is all-sufficient, and if he punish, it is not for his own profit, much less for the sake of human piety, but on account of the sins of men. It is therefore plain that an infinite sufferer must have been an infinite sinner, (2-5.) Job’s exaggerated description of the prosperity of the wicked seems to Eliphaz a denial of Divine Providence.

He now proceeds to refute Job by indirectly arguing the doctrine of such Providence, and carries the war into Africa by an assault upon Job himself. He charges upon him the guilt of oppression and cruelty to the weak and defenceless. Under his emirship might and violence prospered. Moreover, he was a sceptic, well skilled to make “the worse appear the better reason,” (12-15.) That Job should suffer was due to sins such as these, and demonstrated that the wicked are punished in this life. The antediluvians lived just such lives as those of the happy wicked, and their foundation of bliss and security was poured forth like a stream. The triumphant song of the survivors furnishes a text from which Eliphaz confidently urges Job to return to God, with the assurance of returning prosperity, which will manifest itself not so much in worldly good as in joy in God, the consciousness of spiritual uprightness, and the bliss of doing good to others.

 

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Job 22:1". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/job-22.html. 1874-1909.

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

Job 22:1. Then Eliphaz answered — Eliphaz, in this chapter, charges Job home with particular facts of cruelty and oppression, which he supposes him to be guilty of, though he cannot allege one proof of them; to which he adds the atrocious crime of atheism, and a denial or disbelief of God’s providence; and this latter he assigns as the reason of Job’s obstinacy in refusing to submit and acknowledge his guilt. He compares his wickedness to that of the mighty oppressors of the antediluvian world; to that of the inhabitants of Sodom and the cities of the plain; not obscurely intimating that his end would probably be the same as theirs, unless prevented by a speedy submission and full restitution; to which he therefore earnestly presses him, and endeavours to allure him by placing full in his view the great advantages he would probably reap from such a conduct. — Heath.

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Bibliographical Information
Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on Job 22:1". Joseph Benson's Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/job-22.html. 1857.

Mark Dunagan Commentary on the Bible

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Dunagan, Mark. "Commentary on Job 22:1". "Mark Dunagan Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dun/job-22.html. 1999-2014.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

Eliphaz. See note on Job 2:11.

answered = spake. See note on Job 4:1.

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These files are public domain.
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Bibliographical Information
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Job 22:1". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/job-22.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

Then Eliphaz the Temanite answered and said,

Eliphaz shows that man's goodness does not add to, or man's badness take from, the happiness of God: therefore it cannot be that God sends prosperity to some and calamities on others for His own advantage: the cause of the goods and ills sent must lie in the men themselves (Psalms 16:2; Luke 17:10; Acts 17:25; 1 Chronicles 29:14). So Job's calamities must arise from guilt. Eliphaz, instead of meeting the facts, tries to show that it cover not be so.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Job 22:1". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/job-22.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

XXII.

(1) Then answered Eliphaz.—Eliphaz proceeds to reply in a far more exaggerated and offensive tone than he has yet adopted, accusing Job of definite and specific crimes. He begins by asserting that the judgment of God cannot be other than disinterested, that if, therefore, He rewards or punishes, there cannot be anything personal in it.

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Bibliographical Information
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Job 22:1". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/job-22.html. 1905.