Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Job 22:14

‘Clouds are a hiding place for Him, so that He cannot see; And He walks on the vault of heaven.'
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Anthropomorphisms;   Blasphemy;   Blindness;   God Continued...;   Heaven;   Infidelity;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Clouds;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Eliphaz;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Cloud, Cloud of the Lord;   Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Greatness of God;   Easton Bible Dictionary - Circuit;   Cloud;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Heaven;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Circuit;   Job, the Book of;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Circuit;   Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Cloud;  
Encyclopedias:
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Circuit;   Cloud;   Eliphaz (2);   Job, Book of;   The Jewish Encyclopedia - Cloud;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

He walketh in the circuit of heaven - He confines himself to those infinitely exalted regions and cares nothing for the inhabitants of the earth.

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Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Job 22:14". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/job-22.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Thick clouds are a covering to him - This is to be understood as expressing what Eliphaz regarded as the sentiment of Job - that so thick clouds intervened between him and man that he could not take cognizance of what was going forward on earth.

And he walketh in the circuit of heaven - Upon the arch of heaven, as it seems to be bent over our heads. He walks above that cerulean, so high, that he cannot see what occurs on earth, and to punish mortals. This was not an uncommon sentiment among the ancients, though it is here, with the greatest injustice, attributed to Job. A similar sentiment is expressed by Lucretius, as quoted by Rosenmuller and Noyes:

Omnis enim per se Divum natura necesse est

Immortali aevo summa cum pace fruatur,

Semota a nostris rebus, sejunctaque longe.

Nam privata dolore omni, privata periclis,

Ipsa suis pollens opibus, nihil in liga nostri,

Nec bene promeritus capitur, nec tangitur ira.

Compare Isaiah 29:15.

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Job 22:14". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/job-22.html. 1870.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Thick clouds are a covering to him, that he seeth not,.... Thus Job is made to speak, or to reason as atheistical persons, or such who are inclined to atheism would, who take God to be altogether such an one as themselves; as that because thick clouds hide objects, as the sun, and moon, and stars, from their sight, therefore they must hide men and their actions from the sight of God; whereas there is nothing between God and man to hide them from him, let them be what they will, clouds as thick and as dark as can be imagined, yet his eyes are upon the ways of man, and see all his goings, nor is there any darkness that can hide from him, Job 34:21;

and he walketh in the circuit of heaven; within which he keeps himself, and never looks down upon the earth, or takes any notice of what is done there; quite contrary to Psalm 14:3; as if he only took his walks through the spacious orb of heaven, and delighted himself in viewing the celestial mansions, and the furniture of them, but had no regard to anything below them; whereas, though he walks in the circuit of heaven, he also sits upon the circle of the earth, Isaiah 41:22; Eliphaz seems here to ascribe the sentiments perhaps of the Zabians in former times to Job, and since adopted by some philosophers; that God only regards the heavenly bodies, and supports them in their beings, and regulates and directs their motions, and leaves all things below to be governed and influenced by them, as judging it unworthy of him to be concerned with things on earth. Indeed the earth and the inhabitants of it are unworthy of his notice and care, and of his providential visits, but he does humble himself to look upon things on earth as well as in heaven, Psalm 8:4; to make Job reason after this Epicurean manner was doing great injustice to his character, who most firmly believed both the being and providence of God, and that as extending to all things here below, see Job 12:13.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Job 22:14". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/job-22.html. 1999.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

in the circuit of heaven — only, not taking any part in earthly affairs. Job is alleged as holding this Epicurean sentiment (Lamentations 3:44; Isaiah 29:15; Isaiah 40:27; Jeremiah 23:24; Ezekiel 8:12; Psalm 139:12).

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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Job 22:14". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/job-22.html. 1871-8.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

Thick clouds are a covering to him, that he seeth not; and he walketh in the circuit of heaven.

Walketh — His delight is in heaven, which is worthy of his care, but he will not burden himself with the care of earth: which was the opinion of many Heathen philosophers, and, as they fancied, was Job's opinion also.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
Bibliographical Information
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Job 22:14". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/job-22.html. 1765.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Job 22:14 Thick clouds [are] a covering to him, that he seeth not; and he walketh in the circuit of heaven.

Ver. 14. Thick clouds are a covering to him] He lieth close hid among the clouds, and seeth nothing. But be the clouds never so thick, Christ’s eyes are a flaming fire, Revelation 1:14. And the school of nature teacheth, that the fiery eye needeth no outward light, but seeth extra mittendo, by sending out a ray, &c. He will freely blot out the sins of his people as a cloud, and their transgressions as a thick cloud, Isaiah 44:22; Isaiah 43:25; but the clouds cannot hinder him from sight of their sins; for he is all eye, ολοφθαλμος, and darkness and light are both alike to him, Psalms 139:12. A cloud may come between the body of the sun and us, and the whole hemisphere may be masked and overcast, as we call it, but nothing can keep God from eyeing and ordering all things.

And he walketh in the circuit of heaven] Where it seemeth thou thinkest he only manageth matters and beareth rule, and not below. So indeed the Peripatetics thought, and taught. Agreeably whereunto Lysippus made Alexander’s picture looking up to heaven, with this posy,

Iuppiter, asserni terram mihi, tu assere caelum.

With which picture Alexander was so delighted that he proclaimed that none should take his picture but Lysippus, Plin. l. 6, c. 16.

Augustus also heard with delight,

Divisum imperium cum Iove Caesar habet (Virgil. Vita).

Caesar has with Jupiter divided the empire. And the Great Turk, vexed at his great loss in the last assault of Scodra, most horribly blasphemed against God, saying, That it were enough for him to have care of heavenly things, and not to cross him in his worldly actions. The atheist here taketh it for granted that God hath enough to do to walk from place to place in heaven (as princes do in their progress), and to order those heavenly bodies how they shall affect these lower bodies, by their light, heat, and influence, &c. Fain they would confine him to that circuit or circle (the heavens are supposed to be spherical and circular), that he might meddle no further. Fain they would persuade themselves and others that God hath cast off the care of earthly business, and committed all to fate and fortune; that many might live far more comfortably if they were less conscientious; that it nothing concerneth God, whether men do or not do this or that, &c. Such dust heaps as these may be easily found in every corner; for all places are full of them, and so is hell too. As for Job, the counsel of these wicked ones was far from him, Job 21:16, he was the worse to think of them, whatever Eliphaz (by mistake of his meaning, at the least) thought of him.

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Bibliographical Information
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Job 22:14". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/job-22.html. 1865-1868.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

His conversation and business and delight is in the higher and heavenly world, which is worthy of his care, but he will not disparage nor burden himself with the care of this contemptible spot of earth; which was the opinion of many heathen philosophers, and, as they fancied, was Job’s opinion also.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Job 22:14". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/job-22.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

14.In the circuit of On the vault of. God moves in an orbit so high that he does not care for what takes place on the earth. The sophistry of Eliphaz is plain. Job denies the just distribution of evil and good, (xxi,) therefore he rejects the doctrine of a Divine Providence. The reason for this must be either that God cannot know, or that he is too deeply engrossed in the higher departments of his universe to attend to the affairs of this world.

 

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Job 22:14". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/job-22.html. 1874-1909.

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

Job 22:14. Thick clouds are a covering to him — He is surrounded, thou imaginest, with such thick clouds that they conceal us from his sight. And he walketh in the circuit of the heaven — His delight is in heaven, which is worthy of his care, but he will not burden himself with the care of earth; which was the opinion of many heathen philosophers, and, as his friends fancied, was Job’s opinion also.

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Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on Job 22:14". Joseph Benson's Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/job-22.html. 1857.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Doth. Hebrew, "seeth not." Septuagint, "is not seen." --- Poles, on which the whole machine seems to turn. (Calmet) --- "Hipparchus intimated that there would be a time when the hinges, or poles of heaven, would be moved out of their places." (Colum. i. 1.) Hebrew and Septuagint, (according to Origen's edition, ver. 13 to 16) "he walketh about in the circuit of heaven." (Haydock) Immortali ævo summa cum pace fruatur

Semota a nostris rebus, sejunctaque longe. (Lucretius)

This was the error of the Egyptians, (Aristotle, Mun. 84.) which Eliphaz unjustly lays to the charge of Job, as heretics often impute condemned tenets to Catholics. (Worthington)

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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Job 22:14". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/job-22.html. 1859.

Mark Dunagan Commentary on the Bible

The idea here could be that Eliphaz is accusing Job of saying that God is ignorant of the affairs of men, that somehow the clouds obscure His sight.

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Dunagan, Mark. "Commentary on Job 22:14". "Mark Dunagan Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dun/job-22.html. 1999-2014.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

walketh = walketh habitually.

circuit = vault. Hebrew. hug,

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Job 22:14". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/job-22.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

Thick clouds are a covering to him, that he seeth not; and he walketh in the circuit of heaven.

Covering - a veil. "In the circuit of heaven" only, not taking any part in earthly affairs. Job is alleged as holding this Epicurean sentiment (Lamentations 3:44; Isaiah 29:15; Isaiah 40:27; Jeremiah 23:24; Ezekiel 8:12; Psalms 139:12, "The darkness hideth not from thee").

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Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Job 22:14". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/job-22.html. 1871-8.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Thick clouds are a covering to him, that he seeth not; and he walketh in the circuit of heaven.
34:22; Psalms 33:14; 97:2; 139:1,2,11,12; Jeremiah 23:24; Luke 12:2,3
Reciprocal: Genesis 3:8 - hid;  Genesis 4:9 - I know;  Job 11:11 - he seeth;  Job 24:15 - No eye;  Psalm 10:11 - God;  Psalm 19:6 - circuit;  Psalm 73:11 - How;  Isaiah 29:15 - seek;  Isaiah 47:10 - thou hast said

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Job 22:14". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/job-22.html.