Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Job 22:8

"But the earth belongs to the mighty man, And the honorable man dwells in it.
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Eliphaz;   Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Greatness of God;   Hypocrisy;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Job, the Book of;   Justice;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Job;  
Encyclopedias:
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Eliphaz (2);   Honorable;   Job, Book of;   The Jewish Encyclopedia - Bread;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

But as for the mighty man, he had the earth - זרוע איש ish zeroa, the man of arm. Finger, hand, and arm, are all emblems of strength and power. The man of arm is not only the strong man, but the man of power and influence, the man of rapine and plunder.

The honorable man - Literally, the man whose face is accepted, the respectable man, the man of wealth. Thou wert an enemy to the poor and needy, but thou didst favor and flatter the rich and great.

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Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Job 22:8". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/job-22.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

But as for the mighty man - Hebrew as in the margin, “man of arm.” The “arm,” in the Scriptures, is the symbol of power; Psalm 10:15, “Break thou the arm of the wicked;” Ezekiel 30:21. “I have broken the arm of Pharaoh;” Psalm 89:13, “Thou hast a mighty arm;” Psalm 97:1, “His holy arm hath gotten him the victory.” The reason of this is, that the sword and spear were principally used in war, and success depended on the force with which they were wielded by the arm. There can be no doubt that this is intended to be applied to Job, and that the meaning is, that he had driven the poor from their possessions, and he had taken forcible occupancy of what belonged to them. The idea is, that he had done this by power, not by “right.”

Had the earth - Took possession of the land, and drove off from it those to whom it belonged, or who had an equal right to it with him.

And the honorable man - Margin, “eminent,” or “accepted of countenance.” Hebrew: “Lifted up of countenance;” that is, the man whose countenance was elevated either by honor or pride. It may be used to describe either; but, perhaps, there is more force in the former, in saying that it was the great man, the man of rank and office, who had got possession. There is, thus, some sarcasm in the severe charge: “The great man … the man of rank, and wealth, and office, has got possession, while the humble and poor are banished.” Job had had great possessions; but this charge as to the manner in which he had acquired them seems to be wholly gratuitous. Eliphaz takes it for granted, since he was so severely punished, that it “must have been” in some such way.

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Job 22:8". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/job-22.html. 1870.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

But as for the mighty man, he had the earth,.... A large share and portion of it, which Job could not hinder him from the enjoyment of, because mightier than he, or otherwise he would have done it; or Job was content he should have what he had, and gave him more than what of right belonged to him; for when any cause came before him as a judge, or civil magistrate, between a rich man, and a poorer man, relating to a field, or piece of land he always gave the cause to the rich and mighty and so he had the land, as is suggested:

and the honourable man dwelt in it; peaceably, quietly, and undisturbed, though he had no just title to it; or "the man accepted of face" or "countenance"F17נשוא פנים "acceptus faciebus", Montanus; "vel facie", Vatablus, Beza, Junius & Tremellius, Drusius, Mercerus. , who was respected because of his outward circumstances, wealth and riches, power and authority; and so Job is tacitly charged with being a respecter of persons in judgment, which was not good; and in general these phrases denote partiality in him, that he was favourable to the mighty and powerful, and unkind and cruel to the poor and needy. SomeF18Jarchi, Ramban, Bar Tzemach, Sephorno. understand all this of Job himself, that because he was the mighty man, or "man of arms"F19איש זרוע "viro brachii", Pagninus, Montanus, Bolducius, Vatablus, Drusius, &c. , he made use of his power and might, and stretched out his arm, and grasped and got into his possession, by force and violence, the houses, and lands, and estates of others, and became the greatest man in all the east, and the earth in a manner was his alone; and because he was respected for his greatness and riches, he was confirmed therein, and dwelt securely: or rather, taking the words in this sense, they may be considered as an aggravation of Job's sins, both before and after charged upon him; as that when he was the mighty and honourable man, and though he was such, and had it in the power of his hands to do a great deal of good to the poor and needy; yet took a pledge from his indigent brother, stripped those that were almost naked of their clothing, and would not give a poor weary traveller a cup of water, nor a morsel of bread to an hungry man; yea, abused his power and authority which he had, to the oppression of the widow and fatherless, as in Job 22:9.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
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Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Job 22:8". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/job-22.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

But [as for] the mighty man, he d had the earth; and the honourable man dwelt in it.

(d) When you were in power and authority you did not do justice but wrong.
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Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Job 22:8". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/job-22.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

mightyHebrew, “man of arm” (Psalm 10:15; namely, Job).

honourableHebrew, “eminent, or, accepted for countenance” (Isaiah 3:3; 2 Kings 5:1); that is, possessing authority. Eliphaz repeats his charge (Job 15:28; so Zophar, Job 20:19), that it was by violence Job wrung houses and lands from the poor, to whom now he refused relief (Job 22:7, Job 22:9) [Michaelis].

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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Job 22:8". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/job-22.html. 1871-8.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

But as for the mighty man, he had the earth; and the honourable man dwelt in it.

Dwelt — Either by thy sentence or permission, he had a peaceable and sure possession of it, whether he had right to it, or no.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
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Wesley, John. "Commentary on Job 22:8". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/job-22.html. 1765.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Job 22:8 But [as for] the mighty man, he had the earth; and the honourable man dwelt in it.

Ver. 8. But as for the mighty man, he had the earth] Heb. But as for the man of arm, he had the land. This the Vulgate applieth to Job; as if by his power he had wrought all others out, and seated himself alone in the land; suffering none to dwell by him but those that he could not overly match. Others by the mighty man understand the strong and wealthy, who are said to be gracious with Job, sharing with him in his possessions, and partaking of his privileges, when the poor were slighted and could not have justice, much less mercy, Pauperes non dignaris pane: at potentibus possessiones tuas offers, &c. (Vatab.). Here then Eliphaz accuseth Job of pride and partiality.

And the honourable man dwelt in it] Heb. Eminent, or accepted for countenance; that is, he who came commended by his wealth, friends, great alliances, honours, &c., was in great request with Job, and might easily carry any cause with him. Haec sunt peccata gravissima, quae non reputant homines, saith Vatablus, These are very great sins, though men little think of it.

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on Job 22:8". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/job-22.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Job 22:8. But as for the mighty man But if any one had sown a field for himself, being in thy favour, he received the fruit of it. Houbigant, in part after the Syriac. Heath renders it, but as for the mighty man, the whole land was for him; and thy particular favourite he might dwell in it. The meaning of Eliphaz seems to be, that while Job oppressed the poor, he courted and paid all adulating respect to the great and the rich.

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Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Job 22:8". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/job-22.html. 1801-1803.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Heb. And, or but, the man of arm, or strength, or, power, to him was the earth, or the land. i.e. he had the firm possession or free enjoyment of it: which is meant either,

1. Of Job, of whom he speaks invidiously in the third person. The mighty man Job possessed, and enlarged, and enjoyed his estate without any compassion to the poor. Or rather,

2. Of other rich and potent men, who had the earth or land, either.

1. By Job’s judicial sentence, which was generally given in favour of the rich, and against the poor; or,

2. By Job’s kindness and courtesy. The rich were always welcome to him, his house was open to them, his land was before them, when the poor were driven away from his house and territories.

The honourable man dwelt in it; either by thy sentence or permission he had a peaceable and sure possession of it. He repeateth the same thing in other words.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Job 22:8". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/job-22.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

8.The mighty man — Literally, the man of arm. An idiom common to almost all Asia, even in the present day. (Good.) The arm was the symbol of strength; length of arm expressed power; shortness of arm, impotency. “The Lord’s hand is not shortened, that it cannot save.” (Isaiah 59:1.)

The honourable man : that is, men accepted for favour, — favoured on account of wealth and power. Renan renders it, The formidable man; and says, “These misfortunes, in the thought of Eliphaz, took place through the fault of Job. It was the duty of Job, in fact, being judge, to prevent them.” Or it may mean the mighty and the honourable (ironical) prosper, under the emirship of Job, while widows and the fatherless are trampled into the dust; the arm of might excels, and the arm of the orphan is broken.

 

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Job 22:8". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/job-22.html. 1874-1909.

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

Job 22:8. The mighty man had the earth — That is, he had the firm possession, or free enjoyment of it. Which is meant, either, 1st, of Job, of whom he speaks invidiously in the third person: as if he had said, The mighty man Job possessed, enlarged, and enjoyed his estate, without any compassion to the poor. Or, 2d, of other rich and potent men, who had the earth or land by Job’s kindness and courtesy. The rich were always welcome to him; his house was open to them; his land was before them, when the poor were driven away from his house and territories. The honourable man dwelt in it — Either by Job’s sentence or permission, he had a peaceable and sure possession of it, whether he had a right to it or not. Heath renders this verse, But, as for the mighty man, the whole land was for him; and thy particular favourite, he might dwell in it.

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Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on Job 22:8". Joseph Benson's Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/job-22.html. 1857.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

It. Hebrew and Septuagint intimate that Job accepted persons, and gave sentence in favour of his rich friends. (Haydock)

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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Job 22:8". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/job-22.html. 1859.

Mark Dunagan Commentary on the Bible

One view of this verse is that "Eliphaz was saying that the reason for Job"s inhospitable actions towards travelers was his arrogance in thinking he owned the earth" (Zuck p. 104). In spite of the fact that Job was the honorable and mighty man, Eliphaz claimed that Job refused to help those in need, even though he had plenty of money.

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Dunagan, Mark. "Commentary on Job 22:8". "Mark Dunagan Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dun/job-22.html. 1999-2014.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

man. Hebrew. "ish. App-14. See translation below.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Job 22:8". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/job-22.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

But as for the mighty man, he had the earth; and the honourable man dwelt in it.

Mighty - Hebrew, 'man of arm' (Psalms 10:15); namely, Job.

Honourable - Hebrew, accepted of countenance (Isaiah 3:3, margin; 2 Kings 5:1, margin); i:e., possessing authority. Eliphaz repeats his charge (Job 15:28; so Zophar, Job 20:19), that it was by violence Job wrung houses and lands from the poor, to whom now he refused relief (Job 22:7; Job 22:9). (Michaelis.)

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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Job 22:8". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/job-22.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(8) But as for the mighty man.—By the “mighty and the honourable” man is probably meant Job. Some understand the words from Job 22:5-10 inclusive, as the words spoken by God on entering into judgment with Job (Job 22:4); but this hardly seems probable.

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Job 22:8". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/job-22.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

But as for the mighty man, he had the earth; and the honourable man dwelt in it.
But as
29:7-17; 31:34; 1 Kings 21:11-15; Psalms 12:8; Micah 7:3
mighty man
Heb. man of arm. honourable. Heb. eminent, or, accepted for countenance.
13:8
Reciprocal: Deuteronomy 24:17 - pervert

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Job 22:8". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/job-22.html.