Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Job 25:1

Then Bildad the Shuhite answered,
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Bildad;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Bildad;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Job, the Book of;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Shuah;   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Bildad ;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Bildad;  
Encyclopedias:
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Bildad;   Job, Book of;   Shuhite;   Zophar;   Kitto Biblical Cyclopedia - Bildad;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

Bildad the Shuhite - This is the last attack on Job; the others felt themselves foiled, though they had not humility enough to acknowledge it, but would not again return to the attack. Bildad has little to say, and that little is very little to the point. He makes a few assertions, particularly in reference to what Job had said in the commencement of the preceding chapter, of his desire to appear before God, and have his case tried by him, as he had the utmost confidence that his innocence should be fully proved. For this Bildad reprehends Job with arguments which had been brought forth often in this controversy, and as repeatedly confuted, Job 4:18; Job 15:14-16.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Bibliographical Information
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Job 25:1". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/job-25.html. 1832.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

JOB 25

BILDAD'S THIRD AND FINAL SPEECH:

THIS BRIEF RESPONSE IS THE LAST WORD JOB'S THREE FRIENDS HAD TO SAY

Job 25:1-6

"Then answered Bildad the Shuhite, and said,

Dominion and fear are with him;

He maketh peace in his high places.

Is there any number of his armies?

And upon whom doth not his light arise?

How then can man be just with God

Or how can he be clean that is born of a woman?

Behold, even the moon hath no brightness,

And the stars are not pure in his sight:

How much less man, that is a worm!

The son of man that is a worm!"

All that Bildad said here was as applicable to himself as it was to Job; and there does not appear to be any logical argument whatever in this speech.

"The stars are not pure in his sight" (Job 25:5). One may well wonder where he got an idea like this. When God viewed the Creation, "He beheld everything that he had made, and behold, it was very good" (Genesis 1:31). This means that the stars were pure in God's sight; thus Bildad's word here is another example of the fact that Job's friends had not spoken of God the things that were right (Job 42:7).

It is believed by many scholars that much of this last half of Job is obscured by the imperfect preservation of the text, The critical analysis of these middle chapters takes special notice of, "(1) The extreme brevity of Bildad's speech, (2) the similarity of some things in Job 24 to what Bildad said, and (3) the fact that much of Job 27 seems to contradict what Job had previously said."[1] Any rearrangement of the text in these chapters should be delayed until scholars can agree on the way it ought to be presented.. We shall limit our comments to an exploration of the text as it stands.

Meredith G. Kline has given us what this writer considers to be a completely sufficient comment on this chapter.

"Bildad avoids Job's challenge in the last verse of the previous chapter. Anxious, however, to say something, he repeats some of Eliphaz' earlier remarks (Job 4:17ff and Job 15:14ff). This inept repetition by Bildad indicates that Job's philosophical friends have exhausted their resources of wisdom. Bildad's brief and feeble effort represents their expiring breath. Zophar's subsequent failure to speak is the silence of the vanquished."[2]

Copyright Statement
Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
Bibliographical Information
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Job 25:1". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/job-25.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Then answered Bildad the Shuhite,.... Not to what Job had just now delivered, in order to disprove that, that men, guilty of the grossest crimes, often go unpunished in this life, and prosper and succeed, and die in peace and quietness, as other men; either because he was convinced of the truth of what he had said, or else because he thought he was an obstinate man, and that it was best to let him alone, and say no more to him, since there was no likelihood of working any conviction on him; wherefore he only tries to possess his mind of the greatness and majesty of God, in order to deter him from applying to God in a judicial way, and expecting redress and relief from him;

and said; as follows.

Copyright Statement
The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Job 25:1". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/job-25.html. 1999.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

Job 25:1-6. Bildad‘s reply.

He tries to show Job‘s rashness (Job 23:3), by arguments borrowed from Eliphaz (Job 15:15, with which compare Job 11:17.

Copyright Statement
These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Job 25:1". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/job-25.html. 1871-8.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

Then answered Bildad the Shuhite, and said,

Answered — Not to that which Job spake last, but to that which seemed most reprovable in all his discourses; his censure of God's proceedings with him, and his desire of disputing the matter with him. Perhaps Bildad and the rest now perceived that Job and they did not differ so much as they thought. They owned that the wicked might prosper for a while. And Job owned, they would be destroyed at the last.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
Bibliographical Information
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Job 25:1". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/job-25.html. 1765.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Job 25:1 Then answered Bildad the Shuhite, and said,

Ver. 1. Then answered Bildad the Shuhite, and said] A pithy and ponderous speech he here maketh, though little to the purpose, for he quite digresseth from the question in hand concerning the wicked’s flourishing, and saints’ sufferings, he chooseth to sing the same song with his fellows, concerning the power and purity of God above all creatures. See Job 4:18; Job 15:15. Some men are of that mind, that they will never be said or set down, but strive to have the last word. This was Peter’s vanity and the rest of the disciples, Matthew 26:35, which our Saviour winked at till time should confute them, as it also did soon after.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Job 25:1". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/job-25.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

CHAP. XXV.

Bildad observes, that the dominion of God is supreme; that his armies are innumerable; and that no man can be just, compared with God.

Before Christ 1645.

Job 25:1. Then answered Bildad The last weak effort against Job is made by Bildad. The three friends, finding themselves quite baffled in their purpose, which was, to make Job confess himself guilty of some enormous crimes, which they rashly supposed to have drawn this heavy judgment upon him; instead of ingenuously owning themselves in the wrong, which, if one may guess from the usual issue of disputes, is one of the hardest things in the world, this grave antagonist satisfies himself with an evasive answer to this purpose: namely, that no man, strictly speaking, can be justified before God; man being at best a frail and fallible creature, and God a Being of infinite purity and perfection: which is an argument that concerned Job no more than themselves, but must involve them all, without distinction, in the same class of sinners. As we here take our leave of the arguments urged by Job's friends, we may just observe in conclusion, that nothing could be more untoward than this conduct of theirs, to bring a charge against him which they could not prove, and from which his well-known virtue and integrity of life ought to have screened him. But, though Job very plainly shews them the injustice and inhumanity of this procedure, nay, though he confutes them so far that they had nothing to reply; yet, like modern disputants, they stood out to the last, and had not the grace to own their mistake, till God himself was pleased to thunder it in their ears. Here, then, we have a lively instance of the force of prejudice and prepossession.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Job 25:1". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/job-25.html. 1801-1803.

Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary

CONTENTS

This chapter is but short, yet it contains precious truths. It forms the reply of Bildad to what Job had before said. It is not at all in reproof, but only an account of God's holiness, and the uncleanness of all created excellency in his view.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Hawker, Robert, D.D. "Commentary on Job 25:1". "Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pmc/job-25.html. 1828.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

JOB CHAPTER 25

Bildad’s answer: God’s majesty and purity is such as that man cannot be justified before God: before him the heavenly lights lose their lustre and purity.

Bildad answered, not to that which Job spoke last, but to that which stuck most in Bildad’s mind, and which seemed most reprovable in all his discourses, to wit, his bold censure of God’s proceedings with him, and his avowed and oft-repeated desire of disputing the matter with him.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Job 25:1". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/job-25.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

BILDAD’S THIRD AND LAST REPLY.

1.Then answered Bildad — Job’s burning desire (chap. 23) to meet his Judge, leads Bildad to contrast the infinite and overwhelming glory of God with the corruption and meanness of man. How shall such a being — a worm bred in corruption — presume to appear in the presence of Him whose armies cannot be counted, and whose all pervading glory casts into shade the stars, and even the moon, so that it shineth not. This brief and sublime speech is the forlorn hope of a sinking cause — the brilliant flash of a signal gun at sea that tells to night and storm that all is lost. “It is an extraordinary refinement of the poet, that he has kept the last speech of the three friends free from direct accusations, and has, as it were, gathered and concentrated in it all that was true in the speeches of the friends.” — Ebrard.

 

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Job 25:1". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/job-25.html. 1874-1909.

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

Job 25:1. Then answered Bildad — Who makes the last weak effort against Job; and being unable to deny the truth of his assertions, but at the same time unwilling to give up the argument, shelters himself behind the acknowledged attributes of God, power, justice, and purity, and the infirmities of human nature. Probably he and the rest of Job’s friends now perceived that Job and they did not differ so much as they had thought. They owned that the wicked might prosper for a while; and Job owned they would be destroyed at the last. As to the point of bringing Job to confess himself guilty of some enormous crimes, which they at first rashly supposed had drawn this heavy judgment upon him, that is completely given up, and Bildad satisfies himself with an evasive answer to what Job had observed on that head, to this purpose, namely, that no man, strictly speaking, can be justified before God; man being at best a frail and fallible creature, and God a being of infinite purity and perfection; an argument which concerned Job no more than themselves, but equally involved them all in the same class of sinners. This answer has no reference to what Job spake last, but to that which seemed most reproveable in all his discourses, his censure of God’s proceedings with him, and his desire of disputing the matter with him. Bildad’s sentiments are extremely good and pious, but they are but little to the purpose, since he is now reduced to advance what Job had never disputed. “As we here take our leave,” says Dr. Dodd, “of the arguments urged by Job’s friends, we may just observe, in conclusion, that nothing could be more untoward than this conduct of theirs, to bring a charge against him which they could not prove, and from which his well- known virtue and integrity of life ought to have screened him. But, though Job very plainly shows them the injustice and inhumanity of this procedure; nay, though he confutes them so far that they had nothing to reply, yet, like modern disputants, they stood out to the last, and had not the grace to own their mistake, till God himself was pleased to thunder it in their ears. Here, then, we have a lively instance of the force of prejudice and prepossession.”

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on Job 25:1". Joseph Benson's Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/job-25.html. 1857.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Answered. He directs his attack against Job's desiring to plead before God, and gives a wrong statement of his request, which he also attempts to refute, by urging the same inconclusive arguments as before. (Calmet) --- Blind and obstinate disputers still repeat the same objections; (Worthington) as Protestants do against the Catholic doctrines, which have been so often and so ably defended. (Haydock)

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Job 25:1". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/job-25.html. 1859.

Mark Dunagan Commentary on the Bible

Bildad"s brief speech of six verses reveals that he is running out of material!

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Dunagan, Mark. "Commentary on Job 25:1". "Mark Dunagan Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dun/job-25.html. 1999-2014.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

answered = concluded. See note on Job 4:1.

Bildad. See note on Job 2:11.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Job 25:1". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/job-25.html. 1909-1922.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

XXV.

(1) Then answered Bildad.—Bildad attempts no formal reply to Job’s statements, he merely falls back upon the position twice assumed by Eliphaz before (Job 4:17-21; Job 15:14-16), and twice allowed also by Job (Job 14:4)—the impossibility of man being just with God—and therefore implies the impiety of Job in maintaining his righteousness before God. God, he says, is almighty, infinite, and absolute. How can any man contend with Him, or claim to be pure in His sight? This is the final speech of the friends. Bildad no longer accuses Job; he practically owns himself and his companions worsted in argument, seeing that he attempts no reply, but reiterates truisms that are independent of the special matter in hand. Job, in Job 23:3-12, had spoken of his longing for the Divine judgment; so Bildad labours to deprive him of that confidence, as though he would say, “I have nothing to do with your facts, nor can I explain them; but be that as it may, I am certain that you, or any mortal man, cannot be pure in the sight of God.”

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Job 25:1". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/job-25.html. 1905.