Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Job 25:2

"Dominion and awe belong to Him Who establishes peace in His heights.
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Dictionaries:
Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Awe, Awesome;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Job, the Book of;   Peace, Spiritual;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Job;  
Encyclopedias:
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Job, Book of;   Zophar;   The Jewish Encyclopedia - Angelology;   Gabriel;   Michael;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

Dominion and fear are with him - God is an absolute sovereign; his fear is on all the hosts of heaven; and by his sovereignty he establishes and preserves order in the heavens, and among all the inhabitants of the eternal world: how canst thou, therefore, dare to appeal to him, or desire to appear before him?

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Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Job 25:2". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/job-25.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Dominion and fear are with him - That is, God has a right to rule, and he ought to be regarded with reverence. The object of Bildad is to show that He is so great and glorious that it is impossible that man should be regarded as pure in his sight. He begins, therefore, by saying, that he is a Sovereign; that he is clothed with majesty, and that he is worthy of profound veneration.

He maketh peace in his high places - “High places,” here refer to the heavenly worlds. The idea is, that he preserves peace and concord among the hosts of heaven. Numerous and mighty as are the armies of the skies, yet he keeps them in order and in awe. The object is to present an image of the majesty and power of that Being who thus controls a vast number of minds. The phrase does not necessarily imply that there had been variance or strife, and that then God had made peace, but that he preserved or kept them in peace.

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Job 25:2". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/job-25.html. 1870.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Dominion and fear are with him,.... Not with man, as Sephorno interprets it, as that with him is power to rule over the imagination (the evil figment of his heart) to choose the good, and refuse the evil; and with him is fear of punishment, and also the fear of God to restrain him from evil; but with God, as may easily be perceived from the whole context, though his name is not expressed in this clause, and not till Job 25:4; this dominion he is possessed of is universal; his kingdom rules over all, over all the angels, good and bad; over all men, over all the nations of the world, and the great men in it, the kings and princes of it; and over all, of every age, sex, and condition; and it is absolute and uncontrollable; he governs according to his will, and is not to be controlled in his ways; nor is he accountable to any for what he does, and his kingdom is an everlasting one, and his dominion for ever and ever: and by the fear that is with him is not meant actively, with which he fears; for he is afraid of none, be they ever so great and mighty, Job 22:4; but passively, with which he is feared; for holy and reverend is his name, and so his nature, and all that belong to him; he is feared by the angels in heaven, who cover their faces before him, and cast their crowns at his feet; and by the saints on earth, in whose assemblies he is served with reverence and godly fear; and should be stood in awe of by all the inhabitants of the world, because of the glory of his nature, the greatness of his works, and the goodness of his providence:

he maketh peace in his high places; in the high places of his earth, and among the great men of it, creating and commanding peace, and causing war among them to cease, whenever it is his pleasure; and in the regions of the air, where, though there are often thunder and lightning, storms and tempests of wind, hail, and rain, yet, when he says, Peace, be still, all is serene and quiet; and in the orbs of the heaven, the sun, moon, and stars, which know their appointed times and seasons, and keep their place or course, and do their work and office in the most easy and cheerful manner; and among the angels in the highest heaven, which are properly his high places, who, though their numbers are so great, and they themselves thrones, dominions, principalities, and powers, and have various offices and different work assigned them, readily do his will, and are in the utmost harmony and concord among themselves, show no reluctance to him, nor any discord to each other: now Bildad would have Job consider whether he could think himself so significant, that cognizance would be taken of him and his cause by so great, glorious, and majestic a thing; or that he would suffer his high places, where peace reigned, to be disturbed by his noise and brawl.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
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Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Job 25:2". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/job-25.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

a Dominion and fear [are] with him, he maketh peace in his high places.

(a) His purpose is to prove that although God may try and afflict the just, yet soon after he sends prosperity, and because he did not do so to Job he concludes that he is wicked.
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Bibliographical Information
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Job 25:2". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/job-25.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

Power and terror, that is, terror-inspiring power.

peace in his high places — implying that His power is such on high as to quell all opposition, not merely there, but on earth also. The Holy Ghost here shadowed forth Gospel truths (Colossians 1:20; Ephesians 1:10).

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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Job 25:2". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/job-25.html. 1871-8.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

Dominion and fear are with him, he maketh peace in his high places.

Dominion — Sovereign power over all persons and things.

Fear — Terror, that which justly makes him dreadful to all men, and especially to all that undertake to dispute with him.

He — This clause, as well as the following verse, seems to be added to prove God's dominion and dreadfulness: he keepeth and ruleth all persons and things in heaven, in peace and harmony. The angels, though they be very numerous, all own his sovereignty, and acquiesce in his pleasure. The stars, tho' vast in their bulk, and various in their motions: exactly keep the order which God hath appointed them: and therefore it is great folly for thee to quarrel with the methods of God's dealings with thee.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
Bibliographical Information
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Job 25:2". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/job-25.html. 1765.

James Nisbet's Church Pulpit Commentary

PEACE ON EARTH A GIFT FROM HEAVEN

‘He maketh peace in His high places.’

Job 25:2

A great truth lies deep in these words, that peace is a creation; and all creation is an attribute of God. ‘He maketh peace in His high places.’

The most beautiful word that ever hung upon the mouth of man is peace, because it is sweetness to his fellow-men, and it makes sacrifice to God. Many summers and many winters of life go to ripen that fruit. And of that beautiful fruit of the lips hear what God says, ‘I create the fruit of the lips; Peace, peace, to him that is far off and to him that is near, saith the Lord; I will heal him.’

I. The words are meant to teach us that up in His high places God is ever devising and carrying on processes which are to produce peace for men in this lower state.—In mystery, in solitude, and in largeness, before the foundations of the earth were laid, God began to make peace in His high places. He willed that great scheme whereby Christ should come in the fullness of time to make redemption for a yet unformed and yet uncreated world. The ruin of Eden was prepared for in the high places of the Eternal Mind; and at once, at the moment of the Fall, the promise came that peace should be restored on earth.

II. The far end of Christ’s work was to give peace on earth.—When He ascended from His Cross and grave to more than His former greatness, and when from His eternal throne He began to offer up His mediatorial intercession and pour down upon His Church the Holy Spirit, then was the fabric of man’s peace complete, those words established to the very letter, ‘He maketh peace in His high places.’

—Rev. James Vaughan.

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Nisbet, James. "Commentary on Job 25:2". Church Pulpit Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cpc/job-25.html. 1876.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Job 25:2 Dominion and fear [are] with him, he maketh peace in his high places.

Ver. 2. Dominion and fear are with him] God is therefore to be feared, because Lord over all. If an earthly king be so dread a sovereign, if an apparition of angels hath so amazed the best men, who would net fear that King of nations, since to him doth it appertain? Jeremiah 10:7. "God is greatly to be feared in the assemblies of his saints, and to be had in reverence of all them that are round about him," Psalms 89:7. Power and terror are with him, so the Vulgate hath it here. He that is able to destroy both body and soul in hell, is surely to be feared; yea, therefore to be feared, Matthew 10:28. If servants should fear their masters because they have power over the flesh, Colossians 3:23, what should we do, since he can sooner undo us than bid it be done?

He maketh peace in his high places] Or, Among his high persons, those heavenly courtiers, the angels and saints. By an unchangeable decree, God keepeth all persons and things in the heavens, both visible and invisible, in a most firm and quiet condition, so that there is no clashing, but a happy harmony among them. He appeaseth, saith Senault, the differences of the elements, and obligeth them to force their own inclinations, to preserve the quiet of the world. He shakes all the heavens with so much evenness, that in the contrariety of their motions they never disorder themselves. Finally, He maintains peace among the angels, and tempering his justice with his goodness, he makes himself equally loved and feared of those blessed spirits. Therefore Job did ill, saith Mayer, to offer to make a disturbance there (as Bildad at least conceited he did), where there was all peace, Job 23:4.

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on Job 25:2". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/job-25.html. 1865-1868.

Sermon Bible Commentary

Job 25:2

The most beautiful word that ever hung upon the mouth of man is peace, because it is sweetness to his fellow-men, and it makes sacrifice to God. Many summers and many winters of life go to ripen that fruit. And of that beautiful fruit of the lips hear what God says: "I create the fruit of the lips; Peace, peace, to him that is far off and to him that is near, saith the Lord; I will heal him."

I. The words are meant to teach us that up in His high places God is ever devising and carrying on processes which are to produce peace for men in this lower state. In mystery, in solitude, and in largeness, before the foundations of the earth were laid, God began to make peace in His high places. He willed that great scheme whereby Christ should come in the fulness of time to make redemption for a yet unformed and yet uncreated world. The ruin of Eden was prepared for in the high places of the eternal mind; and at once, at the moment of the Fall, the promise came that peace should be restored on earth.

II. The far end of Christ's work was to give peace on earth. When He ascended from His Cross and grave to more than His former greatness, and when from His eternal throne He began to offer up His mediatorial intercession and pour down upon His Church the Holy Spirit, then was the fabric of man's peace complete, those words established to the very letter, "He maketh peace in His high places."

J. Vaughan, Fifty Sermons, 1874, p. 72.


References: Job 25—S. Cox, Expositor, 1st series, vol. viii., p. 270; Ibid., Commentary on Job, p. 321.



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Nicoll, William R. "Commentary on Job 25:2". "Sermon Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/sbc/job-25.html.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Job 25:2. Dominion and fear are with him Dominion and terror are his attendants, while he distributeth perfect justice from the height of his exaltation. Heath. See Hosea 9:7. Micah 7:3.

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Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Job 25:2". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/job-25.html. 1801-1803.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Dominion, i.e. absolute and sovereign power over all persons and things, with whom to contend is both rebellion and madness.

Fear, actively understood, or terror, i.e. that which justly makes him dreadful to all men, and especially to all that shall undertake to dispute with him; awful majesty, infinite knowledge, whereby he knows men’s hearts and ways far better than they know themselves, and sees much sin in them which themselves do not discover, and exact purity and justice, which renders him formidable to sinners.

Are with him; emphatically spoken; with him whom thou challengest; with him who is not lightly and irreverently to be named, much less to be contended with. And therefore it is thy duty to humble thyself for thy presumptuous words and carriages towards him, and quietly and modestly to submit thyself and thy cause to his pleasure.

He maketh peace in his high places. This clause, as well as the following verse, seems to be added to prove what he last said of God’s dominion and dreadfulness; he keepeth and ruleth all persons and things in heaven in peace and harmony; and the order which he hath established among them. The angels, though they be very numerous, and differing in orders and ministries, do all own his sovereignty, and acquiesce in his pleasure, without any disputing and murmuring. The stars and heavenly bodies, though vast in their bulk, and various in their motions, yet exactly keep their courses and the order which God hath appointed them; and therefore it is great folly and impudence to exempt thyself from God’s jurisdiction, or to quarrel with the methods of God’s dealings with thee.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Job 25:2". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/job-25.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

Double strophe — THE INFINITE EXALTATION OF GOD RAISES HIM ABOVE ARRAIGNMENT BY SUCH A CREATURE AS MAN, Job 25:2-6.

a. In any conceivable comparison of man with God (El) the inconceivable advantage must ever be with the All-powerful, Job 25:2-4.

2.Peace in his high places — One of the varied glimpses into the angel world that this book affords. It signifies either the order, tranquillity, and bliss, which his love has established among the heavenly hosts, as unfailing results of universal obedience to his law, or else the peace which followed the subjugation and banishment of angels that sinned; a Scripture truth, traces of which are found in the mythologies of most nations. The allusion to armies in the next verse countenances the latter view. Compare Job 4:18; Job 15:15.

 

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Job 25:2". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/job-25.html. 1874-1909.

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

Job 25:2. Dominion and fear are with him — Absolute and sovereign power over all persons and things, so that it is both rebellion and madness to contend with him; and terror, which justly makes him dreadful to all men, and especially to all that undertake to dispute with him. In other words, awful majesty and infinite knowledge are his, whereby he is much better acquainted with men’s hearts and ways than they are themselves, and sees much sin in them, which themselves do not discover; and to him belong also exact purity and justice, which render him formidable to sinners. These are with him whom thou challengest; with him who is not lightly and irreverently to be named, much less to be contended with; and therefore it is thy duty to humble thyself before him, and quietly and modestly to submit thyself and thy cause to his pleasure. He maketh peace in his high places — This clause, as well as the following verse, seems to be added, to prove God’s dominion and dreadfulness; he keepeth and ruleth all persons and things in heaven, in peace and harmony. The angels, though they be very numerous, all own his sovereignty, and acquiesce in his pleasure. The stars, though vast in their bulk, and various in their motions, exactly keep the order which God hath appointed them: and therefore it is great folly for thee to quarrel with the methods of God’s dealings with thee.

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Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on Job 25:2". Joseph Benson's Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/job-25.html. 1857.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Places. Directing all the heavenly bodies with perfect harmony. (Calmet)

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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Job 25:2". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/job-25.html. 1859.

Mark Dunagan Commentary on the Bible

Bildad does not respond to Job"s arguments but rather asserts that God alone is Lord, and He should be respected, and He has established harmony and order in the heavens.

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Dunagan, Mark. "Commentary on Job 25:2". "Mark Dunagan Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dun/job-25.html. 1999-2014.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(2) Dominion and fear are with him.—He is absolute in sovereignty and terrible in power, so that even in His high places, and among His celestial hosts, He maintaineth peace and harmony.

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Job 25:2". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/job-25.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Dominion and fear are with him, he maketh peace in his high places.
Dominion
9:2-10; 26:5-14; 40:9-14; 1 Chronicles 29:11,12; Psalms 99:1-3; Jeremiah 10:6,7; Daniel 4:34-37; Matthew 6:13; 28:18; Ephesians 1:20,21; Jude 1:25; Revelation 6:16
he maketh
Isaiah 57:15,19; Matthew 5:9; 2 Corinthians 5:18-21; Ephesians 2:16,17; Colossians 1:20
Reciprocal: Job 16:19 - on high;  Job 32:3 - because

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Job 25:2". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/job-25.html.