Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Job 33:1

"However now, Job, please hear my speech, And listen to all my words.
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Dictionaries:
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Pit;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Elihu;  

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Wherefore, Job, I pray thee - In the next chapter he addresses the three friends of Job. This is addressed particularly to him.

My speeches - Hebrew, “my words” - מלה millâh This is the usual word in the Aramaen languages to express a saying or discourse, though in Hebrew it is only a poetic form. The meaning is, not that he would address separate speeches, or distinct discourses, to Job, but that he called on him to attend to what he had to say.

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Job 33:1". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/job-33.html. 1870.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

JOB 33

A CONTINUATION OF THE SPEECH OF ELIHU

This chapter does nothing to improve our low estimate of the quality of Elihu's long tirade. He is patronizing, referring to Job by name, as though addressing an intimate or an inferior, something that Job's three friends had refrained from doing throughout the whole book. His talk is loaded with repetitions; and "He protests too much about his sincerity (Job 33:2f)."[1] Furthermore, he is not perfectly fair with Job. Job had never claimed absolute perfection, admitting minor transgressions and mistakes; but he insisted that he had committed no violent crimes or immoralities that could have been the basis of divine punishment. Also, Job had not accused God of malice or injustice. Of course, he had complained bitterly that things that happened to him were undeserved and unjust; but his mention of such things as coming from God should always be understood as meaning, merely, that God had allowed them to happen. Job might not always have made that distinction clear in his words to his friends. As Andersen noted, "Job had never accused God of dishonesty or injustice; although his words might have seemed to Job's friends that he had indeed done so."[2] The Bible, however, makes it clear that Job had never spoken anything about God that was not right (Job 42:7).

ELIHU DEMANDS THAT JOB HEARKEN TO HIM

Job 33:1-7

"Howbeit, Job, I pray thee, hear my speech,

And hearken to all my words.

Behold now, I have opened my mouth;

My tongue hath spoken in my mouth.

My words shall utter the uprightness of my heart;

And that which my lips know they shall speak sincerely.

The Spirit of God hath made me,

And the breath of the Almighty giveth me life.

If thou canst, answer thou me;

Set thy words in order before me, stand forth.

Behold, I am toward God even as thou art:

I also am formed out of the clay.

Behold, my terror shall not make thee afraid,

Neither shall my pressure be heavy upon thee."

"Hear my speech ...hearken to all my words... I have opened my mouth ... my tongue hath spoken in my mouth ... my words shall utter ... my lips ... shall speak" (Job 33:1-3). What a pompous and bombastic line this is! What does it mean? "Watch him! This bloke is going to say something!"

"The Spirit of God hath made me, and the breath of the Almighty giveth me life" (Job 33:4). "Elihu apparently means to suggest that he has the charismatic gift of divine wisdom which was deficient in his elders who were not able to confute Job successfully."[3]

"Answer thou me ... stand forth" (Job 33:5). The weakness of such demands appears in the fact that, to this point in Elihu's speech, he had not said anything that demanded an answer.

"My terror shall not make thee afraid" (Job 33:7). "Elihu here alludes to Job's charges that God intimidates him (Job 9:34; 13:21); and he here assures Job that this charge cannot be made in the present situation, since Job's opponent here is a mere mortal."[4]

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Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
Bibliographical Information
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Job 33:1". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/job-33.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Wherefore, Job, I pray thee, hear my speeches,.... In the preceding chapter, Elihu directed his discourse to the three friends of Job chiefly, here to Job himself, and that by name; which none of his friends in all their discourses ever used; and in an humble suppliant manner entreats his attention to what he was about to deliver, and that for reasons which his address to his friends could furnish him with; and hence begins his speech with "wherefore", seeing he took not the part of his three friends, but blamed them; and because he had the Spirit of God in him, and was full of matter, and uneasy until he had vented it; and which he proposed to deliver in a plain and faithful manner, with sincerity and without flattery; on all which accounts be beseeches him to give him a diligent and attentive hearing:

and hearken to all my words; not to some of them only, but to all; he bespeaks his candid and constant attention, that he would hear him out, all that he had to say, with patience, and without interruption; and then judge of the truth, force, and pertinency of them; which he would not so well be able to do, unless he heard them all; for sometimes the proof, the evidence, and demonstration of a thing depends not on a single argument, but upon many put together; each of them alone being insufficient, at least may appear so, when all considered together give full satisfaction.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Job 33:1". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/job-33.html. 1999.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

Job 33:1-33. Address to Job, as (Job 32:1-22) to the friends.

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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Job 33:1". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/job-33.html. 1871-8.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Job 33:1 Wherefore, Job, I pray thee, hear my speeches, and hearken to all my words.

Ver. 1. Wherefore Job, I pray thee, hear my speeches] Plain Job, for flattering titles Elihu would give none, Job 32:22; only in prefacing to his discourses he is very large, witness the whole former chapter, which may well stand for a common exordium to all the five following; and the seven first verses of this, wherein he both calleth upon Job for audience, and useth arguments for that purpose. An orator he showeth himself all along; for in his introduction he hath τα ηθη, milder affections, which suit best to insinuate; and toward the conclusion he hath τα παθη, pathetic expressions, that may leave an impression on his hearers.

And hearken to all my words] And not to some of them only, picking and choosing what pleaseth you, and turning a deaf ear to the rest, as he in Tacitus did, who said, Tu linguae, ego aurium dominus, You may say what you please, but I will hear no more than I like and list. This is an evil ear, and must be healed (as the orator told his countrymen) ere any good can be done. The good soul lieth low at God’s feet and saith, "Speak, Lord, for thy servant heareth." All that the Lord our God shall speak unto us, that will we hear and do, Deuteronomy 5:27. Now, therefore, we are all here present before God, to hear all things that are commanded thee of God, Acts 10:33. It is a sign of an honest heart to take the precepts together with the promises, and to tremble at the threatenings as well as to reach after the comforts, of God’s Holy Word; which last every hypocrite will be catching at, as children do at deserts, passing by the better provision.

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Bibliographical Information
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Job 33:1". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/job-33.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

CHAP. XXXIII.

Elihu offereth himself in God's stead to reason with Job, in meekness and sincerity. He excuseth God from giving man an account of his ways, by his greatness; and inciteth Job to attention.

Before Christ 1645.

Job 33:1. Wherefore, Job, I pray thee See the note on the first verse of the preceding chapter.

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Bibliographical Information
Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Job 33:1". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/job-33.html. 1801-1803.

Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary

CONTENTS

Elihu in this chapter enters upon his subject. It is directed to Jobadiah He begs Job's attention: and, as Job had desired, in the eagerness of dispute with his friends, that he had some day's-man, or mediator, to judge for him; Elihu humbly proposeth himself, under this character. He makes a long discourse, and, at the close of the chapter, desires permission to proceed yet further.

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Hawker, Robert, D.D. "Commentary on Job 33:1". "Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pmc/job-33.html. 1828.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

JOB CHAPTER 33

He offereth himself in God’s stead to reason with Job, Job 33:1-7, who had too hard thoughts of God, who by his greatness giveth no account of his ways, Job 33:8-13. God instructeth man by visions, Job 33:14-18; by afflictions, Job 33:19-22; by his ministry, Job 33:23-25. When man prayeth and confesseth, God will be gracious, Job 33:26-28. These are God’s methods of instructing men, Job 33:29,30.

Perceiving the error Job’s friends, and that by their violent and opprobrious speeches they has exasperated Job’s mind, and thereby hindered the success of their discourses, he applies himself to him in milder ways, and treats him kindly, thereby to gain his attention and affection, that his words might have more acceptance with him.

Hearken to all my words; not only to what may please thee, but also to what may convince and reprove thee.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Job 33:1". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/job-33.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

1.That Job asseverates his innocence, and thus implicates God in a charge of indifference towards the upright. For answer see next page.

 

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Job 33:1". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/job-33.html. 1874-1909.

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

Job 33:1. Wherefore, Job, I pray thee, hear my speeches — Here Elihu addresses his speech to Job alone, (for he considered what the three friends had advanced as having been sufficiently confuted by Job in his discourse with them,) and tells him that, as he had oft desired to have a man to plead with him in God’s behalf, he would now do it, and was every way according to Job’s wish, being of the same nature with himself, and neither manifesting any dreadful majesty to affright him, nor assuming any power over him. He then begins to reprehend those passages which he thought blameable in Job’s speeches; particularly his insisting so much on his integrity, which, however evident, should not have been mentioned without due acknowledgment, that the Sovereign of the world had done him no wrong in thus afflicting him; urging that it was not proper for him to call in question the wisdom and justice of God’s providence, because he did not understand it, Job 33:1-13. That God had, by revelation, declared the way of behaviour which was acceptable to him; which was, for men to put away the evil of their doings, and cast off all pride, Job 33:14-19. That if he would conform himself to this rule, he might expect, though he was even at death’s door, that God would restore him to his health and vigour; more especially if he had a prophet near him, who would show him God’s righteousness, in order to his humiliation before God, and the bringing of him to a proper confession of his faults, an acknowledgment of God’s justice in his chastisements, and a sincere purpose of amendment, Job 33:20-28. If he had any objection to make to this, he desires him to make it; if not, to have patience with him, while he showed him the course which, be was persuaded, it was his wisest method to pursue, Job 33:29 to the end. See Peters and Heath.

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Bibliographical Information
Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on Job 33:1". Joseph Benson's Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/job-33.html. 1857.

Mark Dunagan Commentary on the Bible

Elihu is the only speaker that calls Job by his first name. Job had previously asked that his three friends would listen to him (13:6,17; 21:2), now Elihu basically says, "I respectfully listened to you, now please listen to me".

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Dunagan, Mark. "Commentary on Job 33:1". "Mark Dunagan Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dun/job-33.html. 1999-2014.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

Wherefore, Job, I pray thee, hear my speeches, and hearken to all my words.

No JFB commentary on this verse.

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Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Job 33:1". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/job-33.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

XXXIII.

(1) Wherefore, Job, I pray thee.—He begins by professing his sincerity and integrity; and with reference to Job’s expressed desire to find an umpire (Job 9:33), and one who would maintain his right with God (Job 16:21), he declares that he is ready to do so, and that he is, like Job, made out of the clay, and consequently disposed to deal favourably with him.

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Job 33:1". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/job-33.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Wherefore, Job, I pray thee, hear my speeches, and hearken to all my words.
hear
13:6; 34:2; Psalms 49:1-3; Mark 4:9
Reciprocal: Job 6:24 - Teach me;  Job 13:17 - GeneralJob 15:17 - hear me;  Job 18:2 - mark;  Job 21:2 - Hear;  Proverbs 8:6 - the opening;  Proverbs 23:31 - General

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Job 33:1". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/job-33.html.