Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Job 33:25

Let his flesh become fresher than in youth, Let him return to the days of his youthful vigor;
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Afflictions and Adversities;   Agency;   Conviction;   God;   God Continued...;   Philosophy;   Wicked (People);   The Topic Concordance - Deliverance;   Grace;   Prayer;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Flesh;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Birth;   Elisha;   Job;   Proverbs, the Book of;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Job, the Book of;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Job;   Pit;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Advocate ;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Elihu;  
Encyclopedias:
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Flesh;   Fresh;   Job, Book of;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

His flesh shall be fresher than a child's - He shall be born a new creature.

He shall return to the days of his youth - He shall be born again, and become a child of God, through faith in Christ Jesus.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Bibliographical Information
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Job 33:25". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/job-33.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

His flesh shall be fresher than a child‘s - Margin, “childhood.” The meaning is obvious. He would be restored again to health. The calamity which had been brought upon him for purposes of discipline, would be removed. This was the theory of Elihu in regard to afflictions, and he undoubtedly meant that it should be applied to Job. If he would now, understanding the nature and design of affliction, turn to God, he would be recovered again, and enjoy the health and rigor of his youth. We are not to suppose that this is universally true, though it is undoubtedly often a fact now, that if those who are afflicted become truly penitent, and call upon God, the affliction will be removed. It will have accomplished its object, and may be withdrawn. Hence, they who pray that their afflictions may be withdrawn, should first pray that they may accomplish on their own hearts the effect which God designs, producing in them penitence, deadness to the world, and humiliation, and then that his hand may be withdrawn.

He shall return to the days of his youth - That is, to health and rigor.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Bibliographical Information
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Job 33:25". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/job-33.html. 1870.

The Biblical Illustrator

Job 33:25

He shall return to the days of his youth.

The autumn crocus

If the snowdrop may be called the morning star that ushers in the dawn of the floral year, the crocus may be said to be its sunrise. So much is the crocus associated with the showers and the sunbeams of April, that it requires a special mental effort, even when the fact is known, to realise that it also blooms in the fading light and amid the withering foliage of September. There are well-known species of crocus that flower only during the autumnal months. In Switzerland the sandy meadows along the banks of the Alpine streams are covered with myriads of autumn crocuses, whose exquisitely pure and delicate amethystine hue in the glowing sunshine is a feast of colour of which the eye never wearies. Every one is familiar with the pale violet saffron crocus, which blooms according to soil and position from the end of September to the beginning of November. If the yellow spring crocus is the golden sunrise of the floral year, the lilac autumn crocus is its sunset. The autumn crocus is a type of one of the most interesting phenomena of nature and of human life. In many departments there are numerous instances of the recurrence at a later period of something that belongs to an earlier time. The crimson and gold of the sunrise is repeated in the splendour of sunset. The older one grows, the more pathetic does the tender grace of each spring become. So much of what we loved and lost never comes back, that the beauty of the spring touches us like the brightness of a perfect day, when the grave is closing over dear eyes that shall never more behold it. Why should the inferior things of nature return, and those for whose use they were all made, lie unconscious in the dust? The aged live in the springs of the past and their life goes forward to another and brighter spring in the eternal world, of which the springs of earth are only fleeting types and shadows. But though the bright flame of their spring crocus has burnt down to the socket, and only the green monotonous leaves remain behind, is there no re-kindling in the withered plot of their life of the autumn crocus, whose more sober hue befits the sadder character of the season? Yes, man’s life, too, has its Indian summer and its autumn crocus. The season of decay brings to him also reminiscences of the bright season of renewal. Often, where others see only withered leaves, the heart feels the springing of vernal flowers. Job, describing the happiness which he had in former years, and longing for its return, says, “Oh that I were as I was in the days of my youth!” This phrase literally means the vintage season, the time of fruit gathering; and the authorised version, adopting another translation which the phrase also bears, unwittingly expresses the subtle connection between youth and age, the spring and the autumn, the blossoming and the fruit time of life. The true days of Job’s youth was the period when his life became young again through the maturity of his powers, and the consummation of his hopes. It was in the autumn of his life that he enjoyed all those blessings of prosperity whose loss he deplores. The legitimate symbolic use of autumn is as the season of ripeness--fulness of power, not of decay. That there are days and signs of youth in the time of the harvest and vintage of life everyone can testify. The autumn fields are “happy” with the flowers that tell of spring, with the remembrance of days that are no more. True, indeed, the autumn crocus is not the same flower as the spring crocus. It has hues deeper and more intense. It speaks of change and decay. So the joys of our early life, which we recall in late years, are not the same as when they stirred our young blood; we colour them with the deeper and tenderer hues of our own spirit. In the physical sphere of man there are numerous instances of the spring crocus blooming again in the autumn. The cutting of new teeth, and the growth of young hair, in old age, are by no means so infrequent as we might suppose. The eagle’s power of self-renewal has been manifested by many an aged form. In the mental sphere the growth of the autumn crocus is much more common than in the physical, and much more precious and beautiful. How numerous and splendid are the examples of intellect disclosing its fullest powers at the very close of life! As an old man Cute learnt Greek. Goethe was fourscore years old when he completed the second part of Faust. Literary men have often recorded the peculiar delight with which in their later years they have returned to the studies of their youth. The Chinese encourage their students to persevere in their mental pursuits to extreme old age, by bestowing the golden button of the successful candidate upon a man when he is eighty years old, although he has failed in all his previous examinations. But it is in the sphere of the soul that the autumn crocus blooms most beautifully. The rejuvenescence of the soul, the renewal of the spiritual life, may be the experience of all. This youthful victoriousness--the inward man being renewed more and more while the outward man is decaying--is the glory of every true Christian’s old age. Only the fire that comes down from heaven can preserve the youth of the spirit amid all the changes and sorrows of life. Religion really lived keeps the heart always young, always tender. It teaches us that nothing beautiful or good once possessed is wholly lost to us; that there is a deeper truth in the words, “A thing of beauty is a joy forever,” than even its poet knew. (Hugh Macmillan, D. D.)

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Exell, Joseph S. "Commentary on "Job 33:25". The Biblical Illustrator. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tbi/job-33.html. 1905-1909. New York.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

His flesh shall be fresher than a child's,.... Being recovered from illness and restored to health, through the gracious dealings of God with him. This is to be understood not simply and absolutely, but comparatively, or with respect to his former condition; that he, who before was reduced to skin and bone, is now become fat and plump; and whose flesh was dry and withered, now moist, succulent, and juicy; and whose skin was wrinkled, now soft and smooth, and sleek; and whose face was pale, now bloomy and ruddy. The Targum is,

"his flesh is weakened more than a child,'

and the Vulgate Latin,

"is consumed,'

referring to his former state:

he shall return to the days of his youth. His youth renewed, and he seem young again; become hale and robust as in his youthful days; see Psalm 103:5.

Copyright Statement
The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Job 33:25". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/job-33.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

His flesh shall be q fresher than a child's: he shall return to the days of his youth:

(q) He will feel God's favour and rejoice; declaring by this in which stands the true joy of the faithful, and that God will restore him to health, which is a token of his blessing.
Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Job 33:25". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/job-33.html. 1599-1645.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Job 33:25 His flesh shall be fresher than a child’s: he shall return to the days of his youth:

Ver. 25. His flesh shall be fresher than a child’s] Tender and smooth, full of good blood and fresh spirits, he shall be battle and blithe like a suckling. See a like hyperbole concerning Naaman the Syrian restored to health, 2 Kings 5:14, implying that his disease was thoroughly cured, and his flesh in better case than ever. There is a memorable story in the Acts and Monuments of the Church, which here may not unfitly be inserted, to show the sweet fruits of remission of sins by the free mercy of God. In the dungeon with Petrus Bergerius at Lyons, in France, was a certain thief and malefactor, who had lain in the dungeon for seven or eight months. This thief, for pain and torment, cried out for God, and cursed his parents that begat him, being almost eaten up with lice, miserably handled, and fed with such bread as dogs and horses had refused to eat. So it pleased the goodness of the Almighty, that through the teaching and prayer of this Bergerius, he was brought to repentance and the knowledge of God, learning much comfort and patience by the word of the gospel preached unto him. Touching his conversion, himself wrote a sweet letter to some friends, declaring therein that the next day after he had taken hold of the gospel, and framed himself to patience according to the same, his lice (which he could pluck out before by twenty at once between his fingers) now were so gone from him, that he had not one; his rotten flesh (the Vulgate translateth this text thus, Consumpta est eius caro a suppliciis) was recruited, and the alms of good people so extended toward him, that he was fed with white bread, and that which was very good. His name was John Chambone.

He shall return to the days of his youth] Reiuvenescet, He shall grow young again, and renew his youth, like the eagle’s, Psalms 103:5. He shall be vigorous and active, as Isaiah 40:31.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Job 33:25". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/job-33.html. 1865-1868.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Fresher than a child’s, i.e. more sound and tender. These joyful tidings delivered to him by God’s messenger shall revive his spirit, and by degrees restore his former health and vigour.

To the days of his youth, i. e. to the same healthful and strong constitution of body which he had in his youth.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Job 33:25". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/job-33.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

25.Fresher than a child’s His flesh swells with the vigour of youth, (Delitzsch,) or, more than in his youth, (Hitzig,) according as is regarded as causal or comparative. The word ratphash appears in the Arabic with letters transposed, tarphasha, and signifies to “become fresh or convalescent,” or to “grow green.” The figure is taken from plants long withered, but restored to more than pristine vigour under the life-giving power of copious showers of rain. The change Elihu speaks of is like that which took place in Naaman when delivered from leprosy, the type of sin. In the view of Elihu the perfect health of the body sets forth in emblem the work wrought in the soul. Thus Christ spoke the outward healing, and at the same time healed the soul. “If any man be in Christ he is a new creature.” In the old economy temporal blessings were brought into greater prominence than in the new.

 

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Job 33:25". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/job-33.html. 1874-1909.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Consumed. Hebrew, "fresher than a child's," (Haydock) as was the case of Naaman, 4 Kings v. 14.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Job 33:25". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/job-33.html. 1859.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

His flesh shall be fresher than a child's: he shall return to the days of his youth:
His flesh
2 Kings 5:14
a child's
Heb. childhood. return.
42:16; Deuteronomy 34:7; Joshua 14:10,11; Psalms 103:5; Hosea 2:15
Reciprocal: Genesis 31:24 - dream;  Mark 5:29 - straightway

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Job 33:25". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/job-33.html.