Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Job 33:27

"He will sing to men and say, ‘I have sinned and perverted what is right, And it is not proper for me.
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Afflictions and Adversities;   Agency;   Conviction;   God;   God Continued...;   Penitent;   Philosophy;   Repentance;   Wicked (People);   Thompson Chain Reference - Confession of Sin;   Profit and Loss;   Sin;   Unprofitable, Sin;   The Topic Concordance - Deliverance;   Enlightenment;   Grace;   Light;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Anger of God, the;   Confession of Sin;   Repentance;   Sin;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Job;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Proverbs, the Book of;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Job, the Book of;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Job;   Pit;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Advocate ;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Elihu;  
Encyclopedias:
The Jewish Encyclopedia - Confession of Sin;  
Devotionals:
Faith's Checkbook - Devotion for January 25;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

He looketh upon men - אנשים anashim, wretched, fallen men. He shines into them, to convince them of sin; and if any, under this convincing light of God, say, I have sinned against heaven and before thee, and perverted the right - abused the powers, faculties, mercies, and advantages, which thou didst give me, by seeking rest and happiness in the creature, and it profited me not - it was all vanity and vexation of spirit; לי שוה ולא velo shavah li, "and it was not equal to me," did not come up to my expectation, nor supply my wants: -

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Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Job 33:27". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/job-33.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

He looketh upon men - Margin, “or, he shall look upon men, and say, I have sinned.” Umbreit renders this, Nun singt er jubelnd zu den Menschen - “now he sings joyfully among men.” So Noyes, “He shall sing among men, and say.” Prof. Lee “He shall fully consider or pronounce right to men, so that one shall say, I have sinned.” Coverdale, “Such a respect hath he unto men. Therefore let a man confess and say, I have offended.” The Septuagint renders it, Εἷτα τὸτε άπιμέμψεται ἄνθρωπος άυτος ἑαυτῳ Eita tote apomempsetai anthrōpos autos heautō “then shall a man blame himself,” etc. These various renderings arise from the difference of signification attached to the Hebrew word ישׁר yāshor According to our interpretation, it is derived from שׁיר shı̂yr “to sing,” and then the meaning would be, “he sings before men,” and thus the reference would be to the sufferer, meaning that he would have occasion to rejoice among men. See Gesenius on the word. According to the other view, the word is derived from שׁור shûr “to look round”; “to care for, or regard”; and according to this, the reference is to God, meaning that he carefully and attentively observes people in such circumstances, and, if he sees evidence that there is true penitence, he has compassion and saves. This idea certainly accords better with the scope of the passage than the former, and it seems to me is to be regarded as correct.

And if any say, I have sinned - Hebrew “And says,” that is, if the sufferer, under the pressure of his afflictions, is willing to confess his faults, then God is ready to show him mercy. This accords with what Elihu purposed to state of the design of afflictions, that they were intended to bring people to reflection, and to be a means of wholesome discipline. There is no doubt that he meant that all this should be understood by Job as applicable to himself, for he manifestly means to be understood as saying that he had not seen in him the evidence of a penitent mind, such as he supposed afflictions were designed to produce.

And perverted that which was right - That is, in regard to operations and views of the divine government. He had held error, or had cherished wrong apprehensions of the divine character. Or it may mean, that he had dealt unjustly with people in his contact with them.

And it profited me not - The word used here (שׁוה shâvâh ) means properly to be even or level; then to be equal, or of like value; and here may mean, that he now saw that it was no advantage to him to have done wickedly, since it brought upon him such a punishment, or the benefit which he received from his life of wickedness was no equivalent for the pain which he had been called to suffer in consequence of it. This is the common interpretation. Rosenmuller, however, suggests another, which is, that he designs by this language to express his sense of the divine mercy, and that it means “my afflictions are in no sense equal to my deserts. I have not been punished as I might justly have been, for God has interposed to spare me.” It seems to me, however, that the former interpretation accords best with the meaning of the words and the scope of the passage. It would then be the reflection of a man on the bed of suffering, that the course of life which brought him there had been attended with no advantage, but had been the means of plunging him into deserved sorrows. from which he could be rescued only by the grace of God.

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Job 33:27". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/job-33.html. 1870.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

He looketh upon men,.... According to our version, and other interpreters, the sense is, God looks upon men as he does on all men in general, their ways and their works; and particularly he takes notice of men under affliction, and observes how they behave; if they are penitent and confess their sins, he restores them to health, and does them good both in body and soul. But most carry the sense another way, and interpret it of the sick man recovered, who looks upon his friends and relations about him, and any others that come within his reach; of he goes about them, as Aben Ezra explains the word; or will accompany with men, as Mr. Broughton; or sets them in rows, as Gersom, in order, as at a levee, that he may the better address them; or he shall direct himself to them, as the Targum; or shall sing over them or before them, so SchultensF20ישר על "cantabit super vel coram", Schultens. ; in a joyful manner, in an exulting strain, express himself, as follows; for the phrase,

and if any sayF21ויאסר "et dicat", V. L. Beza, Montanus, Mercerus, Michaelis, Schultens. , should be rendered, "and he shall say"; make the following confession of his acknowledgment of the goodness of God unto him;

I have sinned; against God and man, and that has been the cause of all my afflictions; I am now sensible of it, and ingenuously own it:

and perverted that which was right: have not done that which is right in the sight of God, nor what is just and right between man and man; have perverted the right ways of God, swerved from his commandments, and gone into crooked paths, with the workers of iniquity; and declined from, or perverted, justice and judgment among men;

and it profiteth me not; as sin does not in the issue; though it promises profit and advantage, it does not yield it; but, on the contrary, much harm and mischief come by it.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
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Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Job 33:27". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/job-33.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

He looketh upon men, and [if any] say, I have sinned, and s perverted [that which was] right, and it profited t me not;

(s) That is, done wickedly.

(t) But my sins have been the cause of God's wrath toward me.

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Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Job 33:27". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/job-33.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

he looketh — God. Rather, with Umbreit, “Now he (the restored penitent) singeth joyfully (answering to “joy,” Job 33:26; Psalm 51:12) before men, and saith,” etc. (Proverbs 25:20; Psalm 66:16; Psalm 116:14).

perverted — made the straight crooked: as Job had misrepresented God‘s character.

profited — literally, “was made even” to me; rather, “My punishment was not commensurate with my sin” (so Zophar, Job 11:6); the reverse of what Job heretofore said (Job 16:17; Psalm 103:10; Ezra 9:13).

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This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Job 33:27". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/job-33.html. 1871-8.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Job 33:27 He looketh upon men, and [if any] say, I have sinned, and perverted [that which was] right, and it profited me not;

Ver. 27. He looketh upon men] He looketh to see when any will repent and return unto him. Now Christ’s looks are often operative, and cause that which he looks after. A stroke from guilt broke Judas’s heart into despair; but a look from Christ broke Peter’s heart into tears.

And if any say, I have sinned] So he say it penitently, as David and the prodigal; and not feignedly, as Saul; or forcedly, as Pharaoh; or desperately, as Judas. In men’s courts, saith Quintilian, it is best to say Non feci, to plead not guilty; but in God’s court it is better to say Ego feci, Guilty, Lord; mercy, Lord; and not to put God to his proofs, as they did, Jeremiah 2:35; since he that hideth his sins shall not prosper, but he that confesseth and forsaketh them shall find mercy, Proverbs 28:13.

And perverted that which was right] Thus the true penitentiary layeth load upon himself, and aggravates his sins, whereof (saith Merlin) we have here a definition answerable to that of St John, 1 John 3:4, "Sin is the transgression of the law." I have writhed from the right, saith he in the text. I have turned aside to crooked ways, and so have deserved to he led forth with the workers of iniquity, Psalms 125:5; as cattle are to the slaughter, or malefactors to execution.

And it profited me not] Sin is an ill pay master, and sends home all her servants by weeping cross. The best that can come of it is shame, Romans 6:21, and godly sorrow, working repentance, 2 Corinthians 7:10, but usually the end of those things is death; this is the just hire of the least sin, Romans 6:23. It not only profiteth not (whatever it promiseth), but prejudiceth and proves pernicious. This penitent man thanks his sin for his late sickness, and yet thinks he hath escaped fair too; for so some render the text, Nec poenas condignas dedi, My punishment hath been less than my offence, Non aequale fuit. See Ezra 9:13, {See Trapp on "Ezra 9:13"}

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on Job 33:27". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/job-33.html. 1865-1868.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

He looketh upon men; either,

1. The sick man shall look upon and converse with mankind, his friends, or others, as he did before, and shall say, (as the following word is and may be rendered,)

I have sinned, & c., i.e. he shall confess to them that God was not to be blamed, but that he, by his own sin and folly, did bring that evil upon himself. And then he shall acknowledge God’s great goodness to him, and shall add what follows in the next verse, He hath delivered my soul, &c., and my life, &c., as they render it. Or rather,

2. God diligently observes all mankind, and their several carriages, especially in sickness and distress.

If any say, I have sinned; if there be any man that sincerely saith thus, God hears it, and will pardon and heal him, as it follows.

Perverted that which was right; either,

1. I have judged perversely of the just and right ways of God, censuring his proceedings against me as too severe and rigorous, whereas in truth I only was to be blamed. Or,

2. I have perverted God’s righteous law by bending it, and making it comply with my crooked ways; or, I have swerved from the right and good way of God’s commands; or, I have made crooked paths. So he repeats in other words what he said in the former branch of the verse, I have sinned. It profited me not; I got no good by so doing, as I vainly promised myself; but I got much hurt by it, even diseases, and griefs, and extreme dangers. This was the just fruit of my sins. It is a meiosis, whereby less is said, and more is understood, of which we have seen many examples before.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Job 33:27". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/job-33.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

27.And say And sing. The verb is of the same meaning as in the inscription of Psalms 7; Proverbs 25:20, etc.

It profited me not It was not requited to me. The Vulgate had the correct idea: “I did not receive according to my deserts.” Grace, instead of justice, is meted out to him. The reader may mark the resemblance between the confession of the penitent here and that of Job 42:6.

 

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Job 33:27". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/job-33.html. 1874-1909.

Mark Dunagan Commentary on the Bible

Here is repentance that is publicly proclaimed to others. The statement "And it is not proper for me": Could mean, "It did not agree with me". "The verb "agree" is literally "be even or level", and from that literal meaning comes the idea of being equal to or of the same value as. The thought here is that the restored sinner will realize that his sin did not give him any advantage and instead worked against him, for it brought him only sickness" (Zuck pp. 147-148).

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Dunagan, Mark. "Commentary on Job 33:27". "Mark Dunagan Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dun/job-33.html. 1999-2014.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

I have sinned. This is true wisdom. See note on Job 28:28. This is "the end of the Lord" (James 5:11), to which all was leading, and which is reached at length in Job 42:2-5.

sinned. Hebrew. chata. App-44.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Job 33:27". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/job-33.html. 1909-1922.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(27) He looketh upon men, and if any say.—Rather, He looketh upon men, and saith, I have sinned, &c.: that is the confession of the restored sinner. Some render it, He shall sing before men, but hardly so probably or appropriately.

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Job 33:27". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/job-33.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

He looketh upon men, and if any say, I have sinned, and perverted that which was right, and it profited me not;
looketh, etc
or, shall look upon men, and say, I have sinned, etc.
Genesis 16:13; 2 Chronicles 16:9; Psalms 11:4; 14:2; 139:1-4; Proverbs 5:21; 15:3; Jeremiah 23:24
I
7:20; Numbers 12:11; 2 Samuel 12:13; Proverbs 28:13; Jeremiah 3:13; 31:18,19; Luke 15:18-22; 18:13; 1 John 1:8-10
perverted
Ecclesiastes 5:8
right
Psalms 19:7,8; 119:128; Romans 7:12-14,16,22
it profited
34:9; Jeremiah 2:8; Matthew 16:26; Romans 6:21
Reciprocal: Genesis 6:12 - God;  Genesis 42:21 - they said;  Genesis 50:17 - they did;  Exodus 2:25 - looked;  Leviticus 5:5 - confess;  Leviticus 26:40 - confess;  Numbers 5:7 - confess;  Joshua 7:20 - Indeed;  Judges 10:15 - We have sinned;  1 Samuel 7:6 - We have sinned;  2 Samuel 24:10 - I have sinned;  1 Kings 8:47 - done perversely;  2 Kings 18:3 - right in the sight;  2 Chronicles 6:37 - We have sinned;  2 Chronicles 12:6 - the Lord;  Nehemiah 9:33 - but we;  Job 34:31 - GeneralPsalm 32:5 - acknowledged;  Psalm 38:18 - For;  Psalm 51:3 - For I;  Jeremiah 3:21 - for they have;  Jeremiah 8:6 - hearkened;  Jeremiah 14:20 - for;  Jeremiah 24:6 - For I will;  Lamentations 1:20 - for;  Lamentations 3:42 - transgressed;  Ezekiel 18:23 - not that;  Hosea 5:15 - till;  Hosea 14:8 - I have;  Jonah 3:10 - God saw;  Matthew 3:6 - confessing;  Luke 15:20 - But;  Luke 22:61 - looked;  Luke 23:43 - To day;  Acts 19:18 - confessed;  Romans 2:4 - goodness;  Romans 10:3 - submitted;  2 Corinthians 7:10 - repentance;  Ephesians 6:1 - for;  1 John 1:9 - we confess

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Job 33:27". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/job-33.html.