Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Job 33:8

"Surely you have spoken in my hearing, And I have heard the sound of your words:
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Self-Righteousness;  
Dictionaries:
Holman Bible Dictionary - Job, the Book of;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Pit;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Elihu;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

Surely thou hast spoken - What Elihu speaks here, and in the three following verses, contains, in general, simple quotations from Job's own words, or the obvious sense of them, as the reader may see by referring to Job 13:27; (note); Job 14:16; (note), and Job 31:4; (note), and also to the notes on those passages.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Bibliographical Information
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Job 33:8". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/job-33.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Surely thou hast spoken in mine hearing - Margin, as in Hebrew “ears.” This shows that Elihu had been present during the debate, and had attentively listened to what had been said. He now takes up the main point on which he supposed that Job had erred - the attempt to justify himself. He professes to adduce the very words which he had used, and disclaims all design of judging from mere hearsay.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Bibliographical Information
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Job 33:8". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/job-33.html. 1870.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

ELIHU'S FALSE INTERPRETATION OF JOB'S COMPLAINT "Surely thou hast spoken in my hearing,

And I have heard the voice of thy words, saying,

I am clean, without transgression;

I am innocent, neither is there iniquity in me.

Behold, he findeth occasions against me,

He counteth me for his enemy;

He putteth my feet in the stocks,

He marketh all my paths.

Behold, I will answer thee, in this thou art not just;

For God is greater than man."

"In this, Elihu had not grasped the essential point, as Job had expressed it; therefore it was easy for him to give his answer, `Job, you are wrong' (Job 33:12)."[5]

"Thou art not just, for God is greater than man" (Job 33:12). Several versions (the New English Bible, the Easy-to-Read Version, the Good News Bible, etc.) render Elihu's words here as, "Job, you are wrong." It should be noted that the mere fact of God's being greater than man does not necessarily prove that any man is either right or wrong. This reminds us of many other things Elihu said.

Copyright Statement
Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
Bibliographical Information
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Job 33:8". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/job-33.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Surely thou hast spoken in mine hearing,.... After the above preface, Elihu proceeds to the point in hand, and enters a charge against Job; which he took up, not upon suspicion and surmisings, nor upon report, nor upon accusations received from others, but what he had heard with his own ears, unless he was greatly mistaken indeed, which he thought he was not:

and I have heard the voice of thy words; the sound of them, clearly and distinctly, and took in the sense of them, as he really believed:

saying; as follows.

Copyright Statement
The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Job 33:8". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/job-33.html. 1999.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

thy words — (Job 10:7; Job 16:17; Job 23:11, Job 23:12; Job 27:5, Job 27:6; Job 29:14). In Job 9:30; Job 13:23, Job had acknowledged sin; but the general spirit of his words was to maintain himself to be “clean,” and to charge God with injustice. He went too far on the opposite side in opposing the friends‘ false charge of hypocrisy. Even the godly, though willing to confess themselves sinners in general, often dislike sin in particular to be brought as a charge against them. Affliction is therefore needed to bring them to feel that sin in them deserves even worse than they suffer and that God does them no injustice. Then at last humbled under God they find, affliction is for their real good, and so at last it is taken away either here, or at least at death. To teach this is Elihu‘s mission.

Copyright Statement
These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Job 33:8". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/job-33.html. 1871-8.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Job 33:8 Surely thou hast spoken in mine hearing, and I have heard the voice of [thy] words, [saying],

Ver. 8. Surely thou hast spoken in my hearing] Here beginneth the charge, and it is for words; Quae leviter volant, non leviter violant. Nihil tam volucre quam maledictum, nihil facilius emittitur saith Cicero, pro Plancio, Nothing is so swift as an evil word, nothing is more easily uttered. But should a man set his mouth against heaven and utter error against the Lord? Isaiah 32:6. Should he toss that reverend name of God to and fro, with such impiety and profaneness, as if his speech could have no grace, but his disgrace? as if Augustus Caesar were dealing with some god Neptune, or the three sons trying their archery at their father’s heart, to see who can shoot the nearest? Surely, as God is the avenger of all such; so Elihu cannot hear it, and not be kindled. Good blood will not belie itself. Psalms 139:20-21, "They speak against thee wickedly, and thine enemies take thy name in vain. Do not I hate them, O Lord, that hate thee? I hate them with a perfect hatred," &c. The very Turks have the Christian’s blaspheming of Christ in execration; and punish it in their prisoners, when through impatience or desperateness they break out in this kind, What a shame is it, then, that our ranters (that last brood of Beelzebub) should, till of late, be suffered to affirm that Christ is a carnal or fleshly thing; and to contemn him by the notion of the man dying at Jerusalem? &c. Can we hear these hellish blasphemies without ears tingling, hearts trembling? &c. When Servetus condemned Zuinglius for his harshness, he answereth, In aliis mansuetus ero, in blasphemiis in Christum, non ita, In other things I can bear as much as another, but when I hear Christ blasphemed I am altogether impatient; for what reason? in this case patience would be blockishness, moderation mopishness, toleration cowardice. Madness here is better than meekness.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Job 33:8". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/job-33.html. 1865-1868.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

I shall not charge thee with hypocrisy, as thy friends do, which God only can discern; but with those words which I have heard from thee.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Job 33:8". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/job-33.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

8.In mine hearing — With the Hebrew, to “speak in the ear” was to speak openly, not secretly, which might give rise to misconstructions. Elihu was so astonished that he could scarcely believe his ears when he heard Job in the first place declare his innocence, and, secondly, charge God with cruelty.

 

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Job 33:8". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/job-33.html. 1874-1909.

Mark Dunagan Commentary on the Bible

He has clearly heard and understood Job"s claims of innocence, in these verses Elihu will summarize what he had heard Job say. This is a very smart move, for Elihu is not ignoring Job or talking over him, but rather he is saying, "I have heard you, and I understand what you are saying".

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Dunagan, Mark. "Commentary on Job 33:8". "Mark Dunagan Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dun/job-33.html. 1999-2014.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

thy words. Compare Job 9:17; Job 10:7; Job 11:4; Job 16:17; Job 23:10, Job 23:11; Job 27:5; Job 29:14.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Job 33:8". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/job-33.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

Surely thou hast spoken in mine hearing, and I have heard the voice of thy words, saying,

Thy words - (Job 10:7; Job 16:17; Job 23:11-12; Job 27:5-6; Job 29:14). In Job 9:30; Job 13:23, Job had acknowledged sin; but the general spirit of his words was to maintain himself to be "clean," and to charge with injustice. He went too far on the opposite side in opposing the friends' false charge of hypocrisy. Even the godly, though willing to confess themselves sinners in general, often dislike sin in particular to be brought as a charge against them. Affliction is therefore needed to bring them to feel that sin in them deserves even worse than they suffer, and that God does them no injustice. Then at length, humbled under God, they find affliction is for their real good; and so at last it is taken away either here, or at least at death. To teach this is Elihu's mission.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Job 33:8". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/job-33.html. 1871-8.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Surely thou hast spoken in mine hearing, and I have heard the voice of thy words, saying,
hearing
Heb. ears.
Deuteronomy 13:14; Jeremiah 29:23
Reciprocal: Job 6:30 - iniquity;  Job 9:20 - it shall;  Job 15:6 - thine own;  Job 35:16 - General

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Job 33:8". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/job-33.html.