Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Job 36:22

"Behold, God is exalted in His power; Who is a teacher like Him?
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Power;   Wisdom;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Power of God, the;  
Dictionaries:
Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Exaltation;   Holman Bible Dictionary - God;   Job, the Book of;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Job;   Providence;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Elihu;  
Encyclopedias:
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Exalt;  
Devotionals:
Daily Light on the Daily Path - Devotion for July 26;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

God exalteth by his power - He has brought thee low, but he can raise thee up. Thou art not yet out of the reach of his mercy. Thy affliction is a proof that he acts towards thee as a merciful Parent. He knows what is best to be done; he teaches thee how thou shouldst suffer and improve. Why sin against his kindness? Who can teach like him?

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Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Job 36:22". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/job-36.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Behold, God exalteth by his power - The object of Elihu is now to direct the attention of Job to God, and to show him that he has evinced such power and wisdom in his works, that we ought not to presume to arraign him, but should bow with submission to his will. He remarks, therefore, that God “exalts,” or rather that God is “exalted,” or “exalts himself” (ישׂגיב yaśagiyb ) by his power. In the exhibition of his power, he thus shows that he is great, and that people ought to be submissive to him. In support of this, he appeals, in the remainder of his discourse, to the “works” of God as furnishing extraordinary proofs of power, and full demonstration that God is exalted far above man.

Who teacheth like him? - The Septuagint renders this, δυνάστης dunastēs - “Who is so powerful as he?” Rosenmuller and Umbreit render it Lord: “Who is Lord like him?” But the Hebrew word (מורה môreh ) properly means “one who instructs,” and the idea is, that there is no one who is qualified to give so exalted conceptions of the government of God as he is himself. The object is to direct the mind to him as he is revealed in his works, in order to obtain elevated conceptions of his government.

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Job 36:22". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/job-36.html. 1870.

The Biblical Illustrator

Job 36:22

Who teacheth like Him?
--Like whom? you ask. Like Him who is the great Teacher and Enlightener of the Church--even God, the Holy Spirit. This question is a sort of challenge to us to point out any teacher equal to the Lord. In what points does the teaching of God the Holy Spirit exceed all other teaching? Consider

I. The nature of His instructions. There are many valuable things, no doubt, which man’s wisdom has to teach. But look--

1. At the amazing nature of the facts which the Spirit has revealed to us. This mystery, that God so loved the world as to send His Son to shed His blood for it; nothing is worthy of the name of wonderful and glorious compared with this mystery, that God was manifest in the flesh, and died for me upon the Cross.

2. Who is like this glorious Teacher in the holiness of His instructions? The Holy Bible is the Spirit’s lesson book. It is there that all His glorious precepts are embodied.

3. And the Holy Spirit’s lessons are indispensable. The instructions which man’s wisdom gives may be useful and important in their way. But we can get to heaven without them. The Spirit teaches us the only way that leads there.

II. The way in which He gives these instructions. Note the variety of instruments which He employs, and through which He gives instruction to the heart. His chief instrument is the Written Word. Here is doctrine, reproof, correction, instruction in righteousness. He teaches also by the living voices of His ministers; and, through them, what a multiplicity of arguments does He employ! And He teaches by His providence; by afflictions; by humbling providences; by mercies and loving kindnesses. Are they looking to the world for happiness and satisfaction? He makes that world so bitter to them by its crosses and vexations that they are forced to learn the lesson of its emptiness and vanity. He further enlightens the eyes of their understandings.

III. The results of His instructions. Let the Holy Spirit preach, and then the man’s faith, and the man’s practice, both are changed. They pray that God the Holy Ghost will vouchsafe to be your teacher and your guide, that He will illuminate the eyes of your understanding, and that He will reveal Christ unto your hearts. (A. Roberts, M. A.)

God’s teaching, our example

The God of the Bible is represented to us under different names and views peculiar to Himself. He is represented to us as the source and comprehension of all truth, goodness, happiness, and glory. When we try to reduce our conception of God to a finite form, the best conception we can form of Him is the highest combination of all the attributes that are good, pure, and glorious. We now view Him as our Divine Teacher.

I. The teaching character of the Divine order. The teaching intention is seen everywhere in the established economy of the whole arrangement of the constitution of the universe. It is not an arrangement to be noticed here and there, but a matter of law and universality, unchangeable and regular. The whole range and laws of nature, the whole animal economy--providence, revelation, Christianity, and the whole works of God as known to us--have a teaching commission. All have their science to make known to men; all have their influence in the moulding of human character. Everything has its message; everything is backed by Divine law and authority. This order is intended, in its teaching power, to lead and reunite us with the source and end of our life, and thus to realise the chief good of our being.

1. The supreme order of which we are subjects is one of universal relation and dependence. Illustration: relation of parent and child. One is made to teach, and the other to be taught.

2. As a teaching power, the order of which we are subjects is one of advancement. The whole is intended to advance. The order of God is ever forward.

3. The order under which we live is one of universal and unending obligation. A condition of dependence is one of obligation. To our obligation there is neither limit nor end. All we have are things to fulfil our obligation with, and the degree of our possession is the limit of our obligation.

4. The order in which we are established is one of useful purpose in its laws and provisions. The high design is to fit all its dependent creatures for the end of their being. The order of God intends to economise all its gifts and talents. No talent is to be buried, no power is to lie dormant, no plot uncultivated, and no opportunity unemployed. All are fitted for themselves, for one another, and all to show the praise of the great teacher Himself.

5. The teaching order of God has fit and sufficient resources to meet its requirements, and fulfil its designs. Everything is an educational link to some higher development. The order of God has everything in itself to make it complete. He requires no foreign element. All perfect order precludes the possibility of deficiency, or any goodness outside itself.

II. God’s teaching is our pattern to follow. All men require much teaching themselves before they are competent to teach others. Teaching is Divine.

1. God’s teaching is our pattern in the kindness of its execution. There is nothing harsh and oppressive in the teachings of God. He allures by promises, and leads on by the cords of tenderness and love; giving us a pattern how to teach those who are under our care and our charge.

2. The teaching of God is one of repeated application. God repeats His calls and applications. If one way and means are not effectual, He tries and uses others.

3. The Divine teaching is one of rule and order. Every period has its work, every work has its laws, and every act its certain and fit results. Constancy is one rule. Attention to small points is another. Earnest action is another. Every power must act its part.

4. The teaching of God is one of gradual advancement. Our wants and capacities, in the order of being, keep pace with each other. When one is small, the other is not great; and as one increases the other advances. God suits His teaching to our wants and powers.

5. God’s teaching contains in it hard lessons for us in our present state and condition.

6. God teaches, by suitable means, to accomplish the end He has in view.

III. The aim and end of Divine teaching. Wisdom is right in the end in view, and the means used to obtain it. One end is--to teach us self-insufficiency and trust in Him. Another, to teach us the evil of disobedience and sin. Another, to educate our nature in its highest powers, to its highest possible capacity. That we should understand the law of His order, and respect it. To fit us for the precise work intended to be done by us. To lead us to Himself, and to make us fit for all His will and purpose. Conclusion--The obligation on our part which the Divine administration of teaching involves. (T. Hughes.)

The being and agency of God

I. His being, as here presented. Elihu points our attention to three great facts concerning this Great Being.

1. He is mighty. “Behold, God exalteth by His power.”

2. He is independent. “Who hath enjoined Him His way?” He is amenable to no one beyond Himself.

3. He is righteous. “Who can say, Thou hast wrought iniquity?”

4. He is adorable. “Remember that thou magnify His work, which men behold.” Man is here called upon to adore Him in His works, which are visible to all.

5. He is incomprehensible.

II. His agency as here presented. His agency both in the mental and the material domains is here referred to.

1. His agency in the mental realm. He is a Teacher. “Who teacheth like Him?” He is an incomparable Teacher.

(a) By symbols. All the works of nature are the symbols, the hieroglyphics He employs. “The heavens declare Thy glory,” etc.

(b) By example. “He bowed the heavens and came down,” and He acted out His grand lessons in the life of a wonderful Man--the Man Christ Jesus.

2. His agency in the material realm. Four ideas are suggested here concerning His agency in nature. It is--

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Exell, Joseph S. "Commentary on "Job 36:22". The Biblical Illustrator. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tbi/job-36.html. 1905-1909. New York.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Behold, God exalteth by his power,.... He exalts himself, or causes himself to be exalted, and even above all the blessing and praise of his creatures; by his power, in the works of creation and providence, he makes such a display of his glorious perfections, as to set him on high, and out of the reach of the highest praises of men. He exalts his Son as Mediator, and has made him higher than the kings of the earth, 1 Timothy 2:5; he exalts him as a Prince and a Saviour, Acts 5:31, to give repentance and remission of sins to his people, and to be the Judge of quick and dead, Acts 10:42. He has exalted the human nature of Christ to the grace of union to the Son of God: and exalted him in this nature at his right hand, far above all principality and power, Ephesians 1:21, he exalts men in a civil sense, who are in a low estate, and raises them to a very high one; promotion is alone of him, he sets up and puts down at pleasure. In a spiritual sense, he exalts men when he brings them out of a state of nature into an open state of grace; brings them out of the horrible pit, and sets their feet upon the rock Christ Jesus; takes them as beggars from the dunghill, and places them among princes, even the princes of his people; admits them to communion with himself, puts and keeps them in his favour, as in a garrison; and at last causes them to inherit the throne of glory, 1 Samuel 2:8. He exalts men, when he sets the poor on high from affliction, and brings them out of adversity into prosperity; and which is what may be chiefly intended here; let a man he brought as low as may, God can by his power, if he will, raise him up again. And this may be said for the comfort and encouragement of Job, in his present circumstances: and so Aben Ezra interprets it,

"God will exalt thee;'

as he afterwards did. The Targum is,

"behold, God alone is strong in his might;'

see Psalm 21:13;

who teacheth like him? He teaches by his providences, adverse as well as prosperous; he teaches by his word and ordinances; he teaches by his Spirit and grace, and none teaches like him. Ministers of the word teach men both doctrine and duty, but not like him; they have their gifts for teaching, their wisdom and knowledge, their doctrine, and all the use they are of, from him; none teach so pleasantly, so profitably, so powerfully and effectually, as he does: the Targum adds,

"right things?'

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Job 36:22". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/job-36.html. 1999.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

Behold, God exalteth by his power: who teacheth like him?

Behold — God is omnipotent; and therefore can, either punish thee far worse, or deliver thee, if thou dost repent. He is also infinitely wise; and as none can work like him, so none can teach like him. Therefore do not presume to teach him how to govern the world. None teacheth with such authority and convincing evidence, with such condescension and compassion, with such power and efficacy as God doth, he teaches by the bible, and that is the best book; by his son, and he is the best master.

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Wesley, John. "Commentary on Job 36:22". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/job-36.html. 1765.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Job 36:22 Behold, God exalteth by his power: who teacheth like him?

Ver. 22. Behold, God exalteth by his power] Vulgate - God is high in his strength. He both exalteth himself and others whensoever he pleaseth. Beza reads it, Behold, God in his strength is above all; q.d. It is he that must restore thee, if ever thou beest restored.

Who teacheth like him?] Vulgate - None among the law givers is like unto him. But the word Moreh signifieth a doctor or a teacher; as Moreh Nebuchim, a teacher of perplexed things, an unriddler of riddles. He knows all things exactly, and does all things with singular skill and understanding. He hath many ways of teaching people, and making them to profit, Isaiah 48:17, and one is by afflictions, which Luther therefore fitly calleth Theologium Christianorum, the Christian system of divinity, as hath been before noted. Mr Ascham was a good school master, saith one, to Queen Elizabeth, but affliction was a better.

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on Job 36:22". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/job-36.html. 1865-1868.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

God exalteth; or, is high, or exalted; the active verb being taken intransitively; which is not unusual in the Hebrew tongue. This is a proper argument to force the foregoing counsels. God is omnipotent; and therefore can with great facility either punish thee far worse, if thou be obstinate and refractory; or deliver thee, if thou dost repent and return to him.

Who teacheth like him? he is also infinitely wise as well as powerful; and as none can work like him, so none can teach like him. Therefore do not presume to teach him how to govern the world, or to order thy affairs; but know that whatsoever he doth with thee, or with any other men, is best to be done. And therefore be willing to learn from him. Learn obedience by the things which thou sufferest from him; and do not follow thy own fancies or affections, but use the methods which God hath taught thee to get out of thy troubles, by submission, and prayer, and repentance. The words may be rendered, what lord is like him? For the word moreb in the Chaldee dialect signifies a lord. This translation suits with the former clause of this verse; but ours agrees well enough with that, and is confirmed by the following verse.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Job 36:22". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/job-36.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

Second division — THE PROVIDENCE OF GOD IN NATURE IS A PRAISEWORTHY DISCLOSURE OF DIVINE WISDOM AND POWER. Job 36:22 to Job 37:13.

Strophe a is transitional. The lofty working of the mighty God not only exalts him above all human blame, but calls uponJob to unite with all beings in a song of praise, Job 36:22-25.

22.Behold introduces each of the three following strophes, (22-25, Job 36:26-29, Job 36:30-33,) each of which contains four verses; which mode of division, together with the similarity in the structure of the verses, is thought to be argument for an original poetical division of the book into strophes.

God exalteth by his power — Better, God worketh loftily in his power. Elihu devotes the rest of his discourse to instances of God’s incomprehensible working in nature, that he may convince Job of a like utter ignorance of the divine working in Providence.

 

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Job 36:22". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/job-36.html. 1874-1909.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Lawgivers. Hebrew more, "a master." In Chaldean, "a sovereign." (Grotius) Septuagint, "what potentate is against him?" (Haydock) --- What art thou, to dare thus to resist him? (Calmet) --- St. Gregory (xxvii. 1.) explains this as a prediction of Christ, "or singular lawgiver." God is most able to punish transgressors, and willing to reward those who obey his laws. (Worthington)

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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Job 36:22". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/job-36.html. 1859.

Mark Dunagan Commentary on the Bible

God is exalted and acts majestically, He is also an unsurpassed Teacher, and "is an independent Sovereign, answerable to no one, and always does right, and therefore cannot be rightfully challenged by man" (p. 158).

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Dunagan, Mark. "Commentary on Job 36:22". "Mark Dunagan Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dun/job-36.html. 1999-2014.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(22) Behold, God exalteth by his power.—The rest of Elihu’s speech is splendidly eloquent. He dilates on the power and majesty of God, and appears to be speaking in contemplation of some magnificent natural phenomenon—as the tempest, or hurricane, or whirlwind—out of which the Lord ultimately spake (Job 38:1). It is probable that this storm was beginning to gather, and that it suggested the glorious imagery of Elihu’s speech. The points are that (1) God is the source of greatness; (2) that there is no teacher like Him (Job 36:22); (3) that He is absolute as well as almighty (Job 36:23); (4) that He is unsearchable and eternal (Job 36:26).

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Job 36:22". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/job-36.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Behold, God exalteth by his power: who teacheth like him?
God
1 Samuel 2:7,8; Psalms 75:7; Isaiah 14:5; Jeremiah 27:5-8; Daniel 4:25,32; 5:18; Luke 1:52; Romans 13:1
who
Psalms 94:10,12; Isaiah 48:17; 54:13; Jeremiah 31:38; John 6:45
Reciprocal: Job 33:12 - thou;  Psalm 25:5 - teach;  Psalm 119:135 - and teach;  Isaiah 40:13 - hath directed;  Romans 11:34 - General1 Peter 5:6 - that

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Job 36:22". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/job-36.html.