Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Job 36:5

"Behold, God is mighty but does not despise any; He is mighty in strength of understanding.
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - God Continued...;   The Topic Concordance - Death;   Deliverance;   Despisement;   Disobedience;   Exaltation;   God;   Government;   Hearing;   Life;   Obedience;   Perishing;   Poverty;   Preservation;   Prosperity;   Righteousness;   Service;   Strength;   Throne;   Wickedness;   Wisdom;   Wrath;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Wisdom of God, the;  
Dictionaries:
Holman Bible Dictionary - Job, the Book of;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Elihu;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

God is mighty and despiseth not any - He reproaches no man for his want of knowledge. If any man lack wisdom, he may come to God, who giveth liberally, and upbraideth not. I prefer this to the passive sense, will not be despised.

He is mighty - Literally, "He is mighty in strength of heart;" he can never be terrified nor alarmed.

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Bibliographical Information
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Job 36:5". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/job-36.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Behold, God is Mighty - This is the first consideration which Elihu urges, and the purpose seems to be to affirm that God is so great that he has no occasion to modify his treatment of any class of people from a reference to himself. He is wholly independent of all, and can therefore be impartial in his dealings. If it were otherwise; if he were dependent upon human beings for any share of his happiness, he might be tempted to show special favor to the great and to the rich; to spare the mighty who are wicked, though he cut off the poor. But he has no such inducement, as he is wholly independent; and it is to be presumed, therefore, that he treats all impartially; see the notes at Job 35:5-8.

And despiseth not any - None who are poor and humble. He does not pass them by with cold neglect because they are poor and power. less, and turn his attention to the great and mighty because he is dependent on them.

He is mighty in wisdom - Margin, “heart.” The word “heart” in Hebrew is often used to denote the intellectual powers; and the idea here is, that God has perfect wisdom in the management of his affairs. He is acquainted with all the circumstances of his creatures, and passes by none from a defect of knowledge, or frown a lack of wisdom to know how to adopt his dealings to their condition.

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Job 36:5". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/job-36.html. 1870.

The Biblical Illustrator

Job 36:5

Behold, God is mighty and despiseth not any.

The law of reverence

Contempt, whether of men or of things, is a feeling that is alien to God. With Him there is no littleness; He neither spurns, nor slights, nor disregards. And the reason is that He is so mighty.

I. God is great in intelligence and despiseth not. How great that intelligence is, in its reach, in its grasp, in its certainty, the Scriptures keep continually before us. He whom we worship is the “Only Wise.” God sees things not only in themselves, but in their connections, sources, and results; sees them with all those secret accompaniments that make matters that are apparently trivial really significant and momentous. Therefore, though man may be careless, he cares; what man holds lightly, he esteems. We argue from the inerrancy of the Divine judgment. We found on the comprehensiveness of the Divine mind. God is great in knowledge and despiseth not, depreciating neither person nor tiring.

II. God is great in holiness and despiseth not. He is so pure and exalted a moral Being Himself, He must needs hold everything of importance into which the moral element enters. Take the minutest moral deflection. He cannot think lightly of that. Sin is sin, whatsoever its scale. He cannot think lightly of the least moral aspiration. The feeblest of our longings, the stretching of a hand, the breathing of a sigh, the dropping of a tear, are matters of interest and importance to Him whose kingdom is a kingdom of uprightness, and who longs for that kingdom to come in the hearts and lives of men. The righteous Lord loveth righteousness. His very purity is a sure guarantee that the yearnings and the strivings of a sin-weary heart will always be precious in His sight. Then beware of contempt. Do not belittle the moral realities. Do not belittle sin. Too often we meet goodness with a spirit of levity.

III. God is great in His love and despiseth not.

1. The greatness of God’s love is a pledge that He will not despise the least or the lowliest disciples. He is not the God of the strong merely, He is the God of the weak.

2. The greatness of God’s love is a pledge that He does not despise the least or the lowliest needs.

3. The greatness of God’s love is a pledge that He will not despise the least and lowliest services. Whatsoever love offers, love will value, love will store up, and love will reward. Two practical lessons.

“He despiseth not any”

It is a poor result of vast wealth or great learning, or cultivated taste, when a man affects superiority and despises others. True wisdom should make us humble, not haughty. God is mighty. Yet His power is the omnipotence of right, and truth, and love. God’s infinite might has co-existent with it, infinite right and infinite love. This wonderful combination in the Divine character is now before us.

1. Behold this combination in the lower orders of creation. The minutest insects are as well provided for as the cattle on a thousand hills. Compared with man, what are they? Yet God despiseth them not.

2. In the revelation of His Word. All language does but poorly express the great thoughts of God. Yet He condescends to all degrees of thought, The old philosophers concealed their thoughts from common people.

3. In the subjects of the Divine regard. Men are in danger of despising each other. God despiseth not any.

4. In the incarnate life of Christ, how near He seems to come to men! It would not be difficult to survey Hebrew society, and pick out the despised classes--lepers, lost women, publicans. Jesus came very near to the weak and weary, the reviled and persecuted, and they found recovery and rest in Him.

5. In the agencies He employs, God does not pass by His own best materials among men; but He uses the humble prayer of a desolate widow, or the effort of some silent worker, who speaks a word for the Master in quiet places of the city. In the moral world there is no need to despise the day of small things.

6. In the sacrificial atonement of Christ. The magnet of the Cross meets all conditions of men, all types of character, all degrees of education, all depths of ignorance, all forces of rebellion and self-will.

7. In the great gathering of the redeemed. There the rich and the poor, the master and the servant, meet together. Jesus is Lord and brother of men. Deity is linked with humanity in the marks and memories of the manger, the carpenter’s home, and the Cross. Many who have had scant mercy from man, will enjoy there the triumphs of the mercy of God in Christ. (W. M. Statham.)

None overlooked

You can buy complete sets of all the flowers of the Alpine district at the hotel near the foot of the Rosenlaui glacier, very neatly pressed and enclosed in cases. Some of the flowers are very common, but they must be included, or the fauna would not be completely represented. The botanist is as careful to see that the common ones are there, as he is to note that the rarer specimens are not excluded. Our blessed Lord will be sure to make a perfect collection of all the flowers of His field, and even the ordinary believer, the everyday worker, the common convert, will not be forgotten. To Jesus’ eye, there is beauty in all His plants, and each one is needed to perfect the fauna of paradise. May I be found among His flowers, if only as one Out of myriad daisies, who with sweet simplicity shall look up and wonder at His love forever. (C. H. Spurgeon.)

God’s reverence for man

No one renders a better service to his fellows than he who leads them to a true conception of the character and purpose of God. No one has been so grievously misunderstood, caricatured, and aspersed as God. Men have looked at Him with sceptical eyes, melancholy eyes, sin-damaged eyes, tear-filled eyes, and many of their readings have been grotesque, unsatisfactory, and mischievous. How much misery has resulted froth the thought that God is impersonal--that the throne of the universe is without a King, that we are in the hands of a remorseless fate, that blind forces are evermore giving us shape, that we are accountable to no authority beyond ourselves! How much misery has resulted from the thought that God is cruel! Some have imagined God a merciless monster, an infinite detective, a harsh taskmaster, a vindictive gaoler. How much evil has been caused by the thought that God is exclusive--that only a select number are His children, that for the rest He has no love, no care, no blessing! How much evil has been caused by the thought that God is indifferent, that He dwells in splendid isolation, too self-absorbed to heed man’s anguish, to ease his woes, redress his wrongs! Here, then, is our thought--God has a profound reverence for man; and this is so because of His unequalled greatness. This we know runs counter to our general way of thinking. We think of greatness as isolating, separating, and not as uniting men. We think contempt a proper sort of thing, and not often do we see greatness and gentleness going together. Our great teacher John Ruskin says “One of the signs of high breeding in men generally will be their kindness and mercifulness.” And Shakespeare says: “Mockery is the fume of little hearts.” Now, whatever we may find in men, we see that the greatness of God is not aloofness, not high disdain, not proud contempt, but infinite love, eternal compassion, omnipotent tenderness, absolute devotion to man’s interests. Behold, God is mighty--so mighty that we are awed as we think of Him. But He despiseth not, for in Him might and mercy are combined. This is an oft-recurring note of the Bible. “I will sing of Thy power,” says the Psalmist, but he adds, “Yea, I will sing aloud of Thy mercy.” And again, “He telleth the number of the stars, He calleth them all by their names.” But what says the context: “He healeth the broken in heart; He bindeth all their wounds.” Oh, beautiful juxtaposition of power and tenderness, knowledge and grace. God does not despise any person. No human soul is valueless in the eye of God; it is more than all else to Him--the jewel of priceless value, the gem of peerless worth. Disparagement of man has been a note of all times, and not least of our own. Man’s contempt for man finds luxuriant expression, and all its signs are ugly. Sometimes we see men despising others because of their poverty. Not for this reason does God despise men. Among the indigent He has found His princeliest souls, His most faithful servants. The ban of poverty is nothing to Him. Sometimes we see men despising others because they are commonplace. The world swarms with the colourless, the insignificant, the inept, the failing. Not so does God regard men. The colourless are full of suggestions to Him; the commonplace all have a place in His great heart. He does not measure men superficially, but radically. He takes note, not of the accidental, but of the essential. God is willing to take in hand the inept, the unbrilliant, the unpromising, and to bring their lives to an undreamt-of glory and greatness. Sometimes we see men despising their fellows because of their sinfulness. Man never appears so mean and worthless as when his sin is obvious. He, to whom sin is most offensive; He, whom it has cost more than anyone, despiseth not any sinner. He loves the sinner in spite of his sin, for love sees what nothing else can see. It is in Jesus Christ we see this truth best illustrated. He went straight to the worst. He touched the outcast, and he became a denizen of God’s Kingdom. More than comforting is the precious truth that no soul is God-despised. He who despiseth not any person does not despise our desires. How often we despise ourselves because of the paucity of our good desires, or else on account of their feebleness. Well, we may sit in stern judgment on ourselves, and it is well, perhaps, we do so, but God despiseth not any desire. And God does not despise any service. Sometimes we disparage our services. We think them slight, imperfect, obscure. God never overlooks the quiet, obscure workers. Do not despise yourself. Are you poor? So have been earth’s noblest children, so have been the peers of piety. Are you sinful? Thank God for the consciousness of your sin; it is a stepping-stone to salvation. Remember, the Church is made up of transmuted failures. God gives to men a second chance, and He delighteth in mercy. Do not despise your fellows. Moreover, it is ours to make it as easy as possible for every prodigal son of our Father to come home. Do not despise God. The adjuration is not unnecessary. Alas! this is the fatal fault of men; they disesteem their Maker, Redeemer, Friend. The Apostle asks: “Despisest thou the riches of His goodness and forbearance and long-suffering, not knowing that the goodness of God leadeth thee to repentance?” (J. Pearce.)

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Bibliographical Information
Exell, Joseph S. "Commentary on "Job 36:5". The Biblical Illustrator. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tbi/job-36.html. 1905-1909. New York.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

GOD'S PURPOSE SEEN IN SUFFERING

"Behold, God is mighty, and despiseth not any:

He is mighty in strength of understanding.

He preserveth not the life of the wicked,

But giveth to the afflicted their right.

He withdraweth not his eyes from the righteous:

But with kings upon the throne

He setteth them forever, and they are exalted.

And if they be bound in fetters,

And be taken in the cords of affliction;

Then he showeth them their work,

And their transgression, that they have behaved themselves proudly.

He openeth also their ear to instruction,

And commandeth that they return from iniquity.

If they hearken and serve him,

They shall spend their days in prosperity,

And their years in pleasure.

But if they hearken not, they shall perish by the sword,

And they shall die without knowledge.

But they that are godless in heart lay up anger:

They cry not for help when he bindeth them.

They die in youth,

And their life perisheth among the unclean."

Many of the scholars are complimentary toward what Elihu says here, pointing out that his approach is a little different from that of the three friends who had spoken earlier. The alleged difference is that Elihu views Job's sufferings and misfortunes as disciplinary, rather than punitive. That is a distinction without a difference. Elihu clearly states and often implies that Job's pride is the cause of God's punishment. The strategy of the devil is here slightly changed. Having given up altogether on his allegation that Job is a carnal reprobate and a grossly wicked man, the new approach is to make him guilty of such a thing as pride - anything, absolutely anything, to induce him to renounce his integrity. Note what Elihu promises here, IF Job will admit his sins. He will spend his days in prosperity and pleasure (Job 36:11); but if not, he will perish.

Throughout this chapter, Elihu's logic is false. In the first part of it, he would prove God is just because he is powerful; "But power does not necessarily go with justice";[7] and then in the latter part of this chapter and throughout Job 37, he appeals to nature. But how does the natural world support any conception whatever either of mercy or justice? "Nature is red in tooth, and fang and claw." "One cannot prove from nature that God is either just, or loving or merciful."[8] It is only by divine revelation that such things concerning God may be known.

"He preserveth not the life of the wicked" (Job 36:6). "This is the same old position advocated by the three friends."[9]

"Then he showeth them their work and their transgression, that they have behaved themselves proudly" (Job 36:9). The lying persuasion of this is that Elihu, pretending to be inspired of God, promising mercy, prosperity and pleasure if Job will admit his sins, lays down the proposition here that Elihu himself, as God's representative, is present to help Job remember those sins he surely has committed but which he may have forgotten. This was Satan's trump card; and when Job refused to believe it, ignored and rejected it, God's judgment of Job was gloriously vindicated.

"He openeth their ear to instruction, and commandeth them that they return from iniquity" (Job 36:10). It is amazing that Rawlinson, while admitting that what Elihu said in these verses, "Is not exactly the truth,"[10] he still finds merit in Elihu's theory of suffering as disciplinary and restorative, rather than punitive. Every word of this verse is a subtle, skillful and lying inducement for Job to renounce his integrity.

"If they hearken and serve him" (Job 36:11). In context, Elihu means, Job, if you will listen to what I say, confess your sins, repent, and turn to God, "You will receive prosperity; if you do not listen, you will perish."[11]

"They die in youth, and their life perisheth among the unclean" (Job 36:14). The word unclean here is the rendition of a word that actually means sodomites, as indicated in the American Standard Version margin. Pope rendered the passage, "Their soul dies in youth, their life among the sodomites."[12] James Moffatt's Translation of the Bible (1929) rendered it, "They die in youth like men debased by vice." Driver made it, "Their soul dieth in youth, and their life among the temple prostitutes."[13] This is of interest, because it indicates the customary brevity of life among the cult prostitutes of the old Canaanite fertility worship.

Elihu no doubt mentioned this because it fitted his theory that God punishes wickedness in this present life; and of course, it many instances he does, as was the case with the cult-prostitutes; but that in no manner bolstered their evil theory that all misfortunes were directly due to the sins of the unfortunate.

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Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
Bibliographical Information
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Job 36:5". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/job-36.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Behold, God is mighty,.... This is a clear plain truth, easy to be discerned, and worthy of notice, and therefore introduced with a "behold"; that God is mighty, the most mighty, the Almighty, as appears from his works of nature and providence; making all things out of nothing, upholding them by the word of his power, and governing and overruling all things in the world, and doing in it whatever he pleases: and from the works of redemption and grace; ransoming his people out of the hands of them that are stronger than they; converting them by the power of his grace; assisting them to do all they do in a spiritual way; supporting them under all their troubles; protecting and defending them from all their enemies; supplying all their wants, and preserving them safe to his kingdom and glory;

and despises not any; not the meanest of his creatures, clothing the grass of the field, feeding the fowls of the air, and preserving man and beast; and particularly he despises not any of the sons of men: not the mighty through fear of them, nor envy at them, whose power and grandeur are from him, which he gives and can take away at his pleasure; nor the mean and miserable the poor and the afflicted, to whom he has a merciful regard; much less the innocent and harmless, as the Septuagint; or the just and righteous man, as the Targum: he does not despise his own people, whom he has loved and chosen, redeemed and called; nor any, as Aben Ezra observes, without a cause; for though there are some whose image he will despise, it is because of their own sins and transgressions; and since, therefore, though he is mighty, yet despises not any of his creatures, he cannot do any unrighteous thing; he does not and cannot use or abuse his power to the in jury of any of his creatures;

he is mighty in strength and wisdom, as there is a pleonasm, a redundancy in the expression, "mighty in strength", it denotes the abundance of his strength, that he is exceeding strong, superlatively and all expression so; and also strong in wisdom, his strength is tempered with wisdom, so that he cannot employ it to any bad purpose, or be guilty of any unrighteousness. Some men have strength, but not wisdom to make a right use of it; but God abounds as much in wisdom as in strength; he is the only wise and the all wise God, and therefore can do no injustice; and thus Elihu, as he promised, ascribes righteousness to his almighty Maker.

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Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Job 36:5". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/job-36.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

Behold, God [is] mighty, and despiseth not [any: he is] c mighty in strength [and] wisdom.

(c) Strong and constant, and of understanding: for these are the gifts of God, and he loves them in man: but as much as God punished Job now, it is a sign that these are not in him.
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Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Job 36:5". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/job-36.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

Rather, “strength of understanding” (heart) the force of the repetition of “mighty”; as “mighty” as God is, none is too low to be “despised” by Him; for His “might” lies especially in “His strength of understanding,” whereby He searches out the most minute things, so as to give to each his right. Elihu confirms his exhortation (Job 35:14).

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This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Job 36:5". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/job-36.html. 1871-8.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

Behold, God is mighty, and despiseth not any: he is mighty in strength and wisdom.

Despiseth — His greatness doth not make him (as it doth men) despise, or oppress the meanest.

Wisdom — His strength is guided by wisdom, and therefore cannot do any thing unbecoming God, or unjust to his creatures.

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Wesley, John. "Commentary on Job 36:5". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/job-36.html. 1765.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Job 36:5 Behold, God [is] mighty, and despiseth not [any: he is] mighty in strength [and] wisdom.

Ver. 5. Behold, God is mighty, and despiseth not any] Much less oppresseth he any one in a good cause, or tyrannically abuseth his power to the crushing of an innocent. He is equally good as great; neither was Job well advised in seeming to sunder these two excellencies in God, the one from the other; since whatsoever is in God is God; neither ought we to think of him otherwise than of one not to be thought of; as of one whose wisdom is his justice, whose justice is his power, whose power is his mercy, and all himself.

He is mighty in strength and wisdom] Or, He is mighty, the strength of the heart, Validus est, virtus animi (Tram.). He was so to David: Psalms 138:3, "In the day when I cried thou answeredst me, and strengthenest me with strength in my soul." At the sack of Ziklag, in the fail of all outward comforts, David encouraged himself in the Lord his God, 1 Samuel 30:6. A Christian is never without his cordial.

Una est in trepida mihi re medicina, Iehovae

Cor patrium, os verax, omnipotensque manus.

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on Job 36:5". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/job-36.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Job 36:5. Despiseth not any Will not yield to any. Heath.

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Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Job 36:5". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/job-36.html. 1801-1803.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

His greatness doth not make him (as it doth men) to scorn, or despise, or oppress the meanest. Though he may do what he pleaseth, and none can hinder him, yet he will not use it to do any man wrong, as Job seemed to insinuate, Job 10:3 19:7 23:13. His strength is guided by wisdom, and therefore cannot be employed to do any thing unbecoming God, or unjust to his creatures; for either of these is folly. Or,

in strength, or virtue of heart; for the and is not in the Hebrew. So the sense is, He is truly magnanimous, of a great and generous mind or heart, and therefore not unrighteous; for all injustice proceeds from littleness or weakness of heart. Truly great souls scorn unjust actions.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Job 36:5". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/job-36.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

α. THE SUBJECT CONSIDERED ABSTRACTLY, Job 36:5-15.

Strophe a Elihu proceeds to lay down some general principles involved in the distribution of the allotments of men; first, denying that God is the promoter of the interests of the wicked; on the contrary, he has committed himself to the final and eternal promotion of the righteous, Job 36:5-7.

5.Despiseth not any — The small and the great are alike to God. He despises not the cause of the lowliest; they also are the work of his hand. God cannot be otherwise than just. Grace, justice, and condescending love are no less the attributes of God than omnipotence and sovereignty. Mohammedanism, in almost unceasing doxology, extols the one attribute of God, “God is great;” the religion of Christ, extols the attributes of grace and love. “All the attributes unite in most blessed harmony,” as Dachsel happily remarks; “since they are all rays of the same sun, they cannot be arrayed against each other.”

Strength and wisdom — Literally, force of heart; heart power, which finally culminated in the cross. God is mighty, not only in power of arm, but power of heart. To allow leb its legitimate meaning, heart, (though it often means understanding,) would accord with the scope of this chapter. The man of God worships a being of heart, not of cold understanding merely, but of warm throbbings toward all whom he has redeemed.

 

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Job 36:5". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/job-36.html. 1874-1909.

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

Job 36:5. God is mighty, and despiseth not any — His greatness doth not cause him (as the greatness of men causeth them) to despise or oppress such as are mean. He is mighty in strength and wisdom — His strength is guided by wisdom, and therefore cannot be employed to do any thing unbecoming him, or unjust toward his creatures, either of which would be an instance of folly.

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Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on Job 36:5". Joseph Benson's Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/job-36.html. 1857.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

God. Septuagint, "Know that the Lord will not cast away the innocent." Theodotion continues to ver. 12: "The mighty, in strength of heart, (Wisdom vi.) will not make the impious live, and will render judgment to the poor." (Haydock) --- They seem to have read Thom, which is now wanting in Hebrew. (Calmet) --- "Behold God is mighty, and despiseth not any: mighty in strength and wisdom." (Protestants) (Haydock) --- Eliu begins to prove that God administers justice to all equally. (Calmet)

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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Job 36:5". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/job-36.html. 1859.

Mark Dunagan Commentary on the Bible

"God is mighty but does not despise any": God is mighty, yet God does not lack mercy. God is mighty in strength and "understanding", that is, literally, in heart.

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Dunagan, Mark. "Commentary on Job 36:5". "Mark Dunagan Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dun/job-36.html. 1999-2014.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

Behold. Figure of speech Asterismos. App-6.

GOD. Hebrew El. App-4.

is mighty. This is the text of Elihu"s discourses, leading up to God"s own addresses to Job. Compare Job 36:26, and Job 33:12.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Job 36:5". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/job-36.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

Behold, God is mighty, and despiseth not any: he is mighty in strength and wisdom.

Strength and wisdom - rather, strength of understanding (heart): the force of the repetition of "mighty" is, "mighty" as God is, none is too low to be "despised" by Him; because His 'might' lies especially in 'His strength of understanding,' whereby He searches out the most minute things, so as to give to each his right. Elihu confirms his exhortation (Job 35:14).

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Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Job 36:5". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/job-36.html. 1871-8.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Behold, God is mighty, and despiseth not any: he is mighty in strength and wisdom.
despiseth
10:3; 31:13; Psalms 22:24; 138:6
mighty
9:14,19; 12:13-16; 26:12-14; 37:23; Psalms 99:4; 147:5; Jeremiah 10:12; 32:19; 1 Corinthians 1:24-28
wisdom
Heb. heart.
Reciprocal: Genesis 18:14 - Is;  Job 9:4 - wise in heart;  Job 33:12 - God;  Romans 12:16 - condescend to men of low estate

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Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Job 36:5". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/job-36.html.