Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Job 39:7

"He scorns the tumult of the city, The shoutings of the driver he does not hear.
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - God;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Ass, the Wild;   Beasts;  
Dictionaries:
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Animals;   Easton Bible Dictionary - Ass;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Arabia;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Exactor;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Knowledge;   Nature;   World;   Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Ass;  
Encyclopedias:
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Cry, Crying;   Scorn;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

He scorneth the multitude - He is so swift that he cannot be run or hunted down. See the description in Job 39:5; (note).

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Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Job 39:7". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/job-39.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

He scorneth the multitude of the city - That is, he sets all this at defiance; he is not intimidated by it. He finds his home far away from the city in the wild freedom of the wilderness.

Neither regardeth he the crying of the driver - Margin, “exacter.” The Hebrew word properly means a collector of taxes or revenue, and hence, an oppressor, and a driver of cattle. The allusion here is to a driver, and the meaning is, that he is not subject to restraint, but enjoys the most unlimited freedom.

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Job 39:7". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/job-39.html. 1870.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

He scorneth the multitude of the city,.... Choosing rather to be alone in the wilderness and free than to be among a multitude of men in a city, and be a slave as the tame ass; or it despises and defies a multitude of men, that may come out of cities to take it, Leo Africanus saysF18Ut supra. (Descriptio Africae, l. 9. p. 752.) it yields to none for swiftness but Barbary horses: according to XenophonF19Ut supra. (De Expedition. Cyril, l. 1.) , it exceeds the horse in swiftness; and when pursued by horsemen, it will outrun them, and stand still and rest till they come near it, and then start again; so that there is no taking it, unless many are employed. AristotleF20Hist. Animal. l. 6. c. 36. says it excels in swiftness; and, according to BochartF21Hierozoic. par. 1. l. 1. c. 9. Colossians 63. , it has its name in Hebrew from the Chaldee word פדא, "to run". Or it may be rendered, "the noise of the city", so Cocceius; the stir and bustle in it, through a multiplicity of men in business;

neither regardeth he the crying of the driver; or "hears"F23לא ישמע "non audiet", Pagninus, Montanus. : he neither feels his blows, nor hears his words; urging him to move faster and make quicker dispatch, as the tame ass does; he being neither ridden nor driven, nor drawing in a cart or plough.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Job 39:7". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/job-39.html. 1999.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

multitude — rather, “din”; he sets it at defiance, being far away from it in the freedom of the wilderness.

driver — who urges on the tame ass to work. The wild ass is the symbol of uncontrolled freedom in the East; even kings have, therefore, added its name to them.

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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Job 39:7". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/job-39.html. 1871-8.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

He scorneth the multitude of the city, neither regardeth he the crying of the driver.

Scorneth — He feareth them not when they pursue him, because he is swift, and can easily escape them.

Driver — He will not be brought to receive his yoke, nor to do his drudgery.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
Bibliographical Information
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Job 39:7". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/job-39.html. 1765.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Job 39:7 He scorneth the multitude of the city, neither regardeth he the crying of the driver.

Ver. 7. He scorneth the multitude of the city] Heb. He laugheth. Insignis metaphora. He would scorn to be set to work, as the tame ass is. Asinum oneramus et non curat, quia asinus est, saith Bernard, We load the ass, and he taketh it well for worth, because he is an ass. But the wild ass will not take so; he is not a beast born to bear burdens as the other. He is not tardum et pigrum animal as the other, a dull and slow creature; for which cause also, saith Bellarmine, God would none of him, Exodus 13:13; Exodus 34:20. Christ so far hateth dulness, that he bade Judas the traitor what he did do quickly. The wild ass is very swift, and fed by God’s providence in the wilderness; scorning the multitude, or the hurrying noises of the city.

Neither regardeth he the crying of the driver] Heb. of the exactor, who rateth and rageth against the tame ass with words and blows, to hasten him to his work, and to bring him this way and that way. Oppressive princes do the like to their poor subjects (the king of France is called, Rex asinorum), which sometimes maketh them turn wild, and shake off subjection; as the Jews did that to the Romans, choosing rather to suffer the most exquisite torments than to be enslaved (Joseph. l. xviii. c. 2). But what a mad conceit was that of Martin Stembach, a Dutch sectary, A. D. 1566, who would needs correct the Lord’s Prayer, Stultam et inefficacem asserens orationem in qua interiectione o uteremur; non secus enim hac exclamandi formula divinam gratiam impediri, quam asinarii, asinorum impetum hoc adverbio? (Lonicer. ex Theatre Vitro).

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Bibliographical Information
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Job 39:7". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/job-39.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Job 39:7. The multitude of the city Or, The thronged city.

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Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Job 39:7". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/job-39.html. 1801-1803.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

He scorneth; either,

1. He feareth them not when they pursue him, because he is swift, and can easily escape them. Or,

2. He values them not, nor any provisions or advantages which he may have from them, but prefers a vagrant and solitary life in the wilderness before them. Or,

3. He disdains to submit himself to them, and resolutely maintains his own freedom.

The multitude of the city: he mentions the city rather than the country, partly because there is the greatest multitude of people to pursue, and overtake, and subject him; and partly because there is the greatest plenty of all things to invite him; the fruits of the country being laid up in cities in greatest abundance.

Neither regardeth, Heb. heareth, i.e. obeyeth. Of the driver, Heb. of the taskmaster, or exactor of labour, i.e. he will not be brought to receive his yoke, nor to do his drudgery, nor to answer to his cries or commands, as tame asses are forced to do.

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Bibliographical Information
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Job 39:7". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/job-39.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

7.Multitude — Better, tumult.

 

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Bibliographical Information
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Job 39:7". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/job-39.html. 1874-1909.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

He scorneth the multitude of the city, neither regardeth he the crying of the driver.

Multitude - rather, din: he sets it at defiance, being far away from it in the freedom of the wilderness.

Driver - who urges on the tame donkey to work. The wild donkey is the symbol of uncontrolled freedom in the East; even kings in Persia have, therefore, added its name to them.

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Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Job 39:7". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/job-39.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(7) The crying of the driver.—Or, the shoutings of the taskmaster. The word is the same as is applied to the taskmasters of Egypt, and this suggests the question whether or not there may be a reminiscence of that bondage here.

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Job 39:7". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/job-39.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

He scorneth the multitude of the city, neither regardeth he the crying of the driver.
scorneth
18; 3:18; Isaiah 31:4
driver
Heb. exactor.
Exodus 5:13-16,18; Isaiah 58:3
Reciprocal: Job 39:10 - GeneralJob 41:28 - slingstones

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Job 39:7". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/job-39.html.