Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Job 40:1

Then the Lord said to Job,
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Afflictions and Adversities;   God;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Leviathan;   Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - God;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Animals;   Job, the Book of;  
Encyclopedias:
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Election;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

Moreover the Lord answered - That is, the Lord continued his discourse with Job. Answered does not refer to any thing said by Job, or any question asked. I think it very likely that this whole piece, from the beginning of this first verse to the end of the fourteenth, was originally the ending of the poem. Mr. Heath has noticed this, and I shall lay his words before the reader: "The former part of this chapter is evidently the conclusion of the poem; the latter part whereof seems to be in great disorder; whether it has happened from the carelessness of the transcriber, or, which appears most probable, from the skins of parchment composing the roll having by some accident changed their places. It is plain from the seventh verse of the forty-second chapter { Job 42:7;} that Jehovah is the last speaker in the poem. If, then, immediately after the end of the thirty-ninth chapter, we subjoin the fifteenth verse of the forty-second chapter, and place the fourteen first verses of the fortieth chapter immediately after the sixth verse of the forty-second chapter, and by that means make them the conclusion of the poem, all will be right; and this seventh verse of the forty-second chapter will be in its natural order. The action will be complete by the judgment of the Almighty; and the catastrophe of the poem will be grand and solemn." To these reasons of Mr. Heath, Dr. Kennicott has added others, which the reader may find at the end of the chapter. { Job 40:24;} Without taking any farther notice of the transposition in this place, I will continue the notes in the present order of the verses.

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Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Job 40:1". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/job-40.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Moreover, the Lord answered Job - The word “answered” is used here as it is often in the Scriptures, not to denote a reply to what had been immediately said, but to take up or continue an argument. What God said here was designed as a reply to the spirit which Job had so frequently manifested.

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Job 40:1". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/job-40.html. 1870.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

JOB 40

GOD CONCLUDES HIS SPEECH TO JOB (JOB 40-41)

"This concluding speech of God to Job falls into three parts: (1) Job is (ironically) invited to assume the throne of the universe (Job 40:7-14). (2) There is the description of Behemoth (Job 40:15-24), and (3) the description of Leviathan (Job 41:1-34)."[1]

In the Genesis account of Jacob's wrestling with `a man' until the breaking of day, some respected writers find a similar thing revealed in the Book of Job, Job `wrestling with God.' Kline, depending upon some of the ancient versions which support that analogy, noted that, "The `first fall' of the wrestling ordeal is about to be decided."[2]

Job 40:1-2

"Moreover Jehovah answered Job, and said,

Shall he that cavilleth contend with the Almighty?

He that argueth with God, let him answer it."

Kline interpreted this to mean, "Will the contender with the Almighty yield"?[3] There is evidence here of God's disapproval of things that Job has spoken; but it appears to be somewhat a mild disapproval. Certainly, God's Words to Job are far more contradictory of the arrogant over-confidence of Job's friends, "Who believed that they had arrived at a definition of God's righteousness on the basis of human experience."[4]

God's disapproval of Job's complaint appears to have centered, "In the spirit which Job had manifested, and especially for his presumption,"[5] in supposing that he could even carry his case before God Himself (Job 13:3,21,22). But now, having considered the immeasurable greatness and wonder of God's power as exhibited in the natural and sidereal creations, the contender with God is greatly subdued, but not yet repentant. "Actually (whether or not Job realized it), his many complaints were the equivalent of his `contending with God.'"[6]

Driver's paraphrase of these first two verses is, "Will Job still carry on the dispute? If so, he must answer the questions Jehovah has put to him, and explain the marvels of creation that God has brought before him; and if he cannot do so, he has no right to criticize and reprove."[7]

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Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
Bibliographical Information
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Job 40:1". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/job-40.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Moreover the Lord answered Job,.... The Lord having discoursed largely of the works of nature, in order to reconcile the mind of Job to his works of providence, stopped and made a pause for a little space, that Job might answer if he thought fit; but he being entirely silent, the Lord began again:

and said; as follows:

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Job 40:1". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/job-40.html. 1999.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

Job 40:1-24. God‘s second address.

He had paused for a reply, but Job was silent.

the LordHebrew, “Jehovah.”

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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Job 40:1". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/job-40.html. 1871-8.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

Moreover the LORD answered Job, and said,

Answered — Having made a little pause to try what Job could answer. This is not said to be spoken out of the whirlwind, and therefore some think God said it in a still, small voice, which wrought more upon Job, (as upon Elijah) than the whirlwind did. Tho' Job had not spoken any thing, yet God is said to answer him. For he knows mens thoughts, and can return a fit answer to their silence.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
Bibliographical Information
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Job 40:1". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/job-40.html. 1765.

James Nisbet's Church Pulpit Commentary

THE DIVINE ANSWER

‘The Lord answered Job.’

Job 40:1

I. Again Jehovah proceeds, and as at the commencement of the last, so now He charges Job to ‘gird up’ his ‘loins like a man.’—In each case there is in this introductory word the suggestion of God’s consciousness of man’s dignity. The things which He has been describing cannot hear or answer this Divine wisdom. Job can, and he is called upon to exercise these distinctive powers of his humanity. The present address of God deals with the one respect in which Job has manifested his folly. In the midst of all his suffering he has by inference flung blame upon the method of God. This God now challenges, not to explain it, but first to suggest to Job that he attempts to occupy God’s place in the universe. There is a fine and tender satire in Jehovah’s call to Job to assume the reins of government. Let him deck himself, and array himself, and exercise his power. Let him do it in the moral realm, in which his criticism has been at work. Let him abase and humble the proud and lofty, and evil and wicked ones. When Job can do this, then Jehovah will acknowledge that his own right hand can save him.

II. Having challenged Job to assume the government of the world, and that in the moral realm, Jehovah now suggests two experiments.—It has been objected by some that the descriptions of behemoth and leviathan are interpolations, as they do not seem to fit in with the general argument at this point. This surely, however, misses the real thought. Having, as we have seen, called upon Job to exercise government, and that in the moral realm, Jehovah brings before him two animals, non-moral; and, moreover, suggests that Job should exercise his authority and power over them. This is a much easier thing than governing men. The material always yields itself to man’s government with greater ease than the moral. If this man can be made to feel his absolute weakness in the lower sphere, he will naturally deduce therefrom his impotence in the higher. If he cannot govern these, how can he assume the functions of the One who made them, and perfectly governs them? The description of behemoth leaves very little room for doubt that the animal we know as the hippopotamus is intended. Let all the description be carefully noted, and correspondence will be discovered.

Illustration

‘The reasoning is from the less to the greater, and is, therefore, in this case conclusive. The lower animals exercise their instincts and find what is suited to their needs. And shall it not be so with man? Shall he, able to observe the signs of an all-embracing plan, not confess and trust the sublime justice it reveals? The slightness of human power is certainly contrasted with the omnipotence of God, and the ignorance of man with the omniscience of God; but always the Divine faithfulness, glowing behind, shines through the veil of nature, and it is this Job is called to recognise.’

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Bibliographical Information
Nisbet, James. "Commentary on Job 40:1". Church Pulpit Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cpc/job-40.html. 1876.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Job 40:1 Moreover the LORD answered Job, and said,

Ver. 1. Moreover the Lord answered Job, and said] Hic verisimile est aliquantisper Deum tacuisse, saith Mercer. Here it is likely that God held his peace awhile, and seeing that Job replied not, he added the following words, the more fully to convince and affect him. There is somewhat to do to reduce a sinner from the error of his way; yea, though he be in part regenerate, the flesh will play its part against the spirit. This must be considered, and all gentleness used to those that offend of infirmity, after God’s example here.

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Bibliographical Information
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Job 40:1". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/job-40.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

CHAP. XL.

Job humbleth himself before God; who further challengeth him by a display of the works of his power. A description of the Behemoth.

Before Christ 1645.

Job 40:1. Moreover the Lord answered Job, and said Houbigant subjoins the first five verses of this chapter to the 39th, after the Hebrew, and many of the versions. See the Polyglot.

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Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Job 40:1". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/job-40.html. 1801-1803.

Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary

CONTENTS

The Lord having, in the former chapter, thus answered Job, agreeably to his wish, in the opening of this chapter demands Job's reply. Job most humbly gives it: after which the Lord takes up the discourse again, and continues it to the close of this, and through the whole of the next chapter.

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Hawker, Robert, D.D. "Commentary on Job 40:1". "Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pmc/job-40.html. 1828.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

JOB CHAPTER 40

God’s reproof of Job, Job 40:1,2. He humbleth himself, Job 40:3-5. God again declareth his righteousness, majesty, and the power of his wrath to abase the proud, Job 40:6-14. A description of behemoth, Job 40:15-21.

Having made a little pause to try what Job could answer to his questions, and Job being it seems astonished with God’s rebukes, or expecting what God would further say, continued silent.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Job 40:1". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/job-40.html. 1685.

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

Job 40:1. Moreover the Lord answered Job — Having first made a little pause to try what Job had to allege in his own defence, or could answer to his questions; and he continuing silent, as being, it seems, astonished at God’s rebukes, or expecting what he would further say, the Lord proceeded with his questions and rebukes. What follows is not said to be spoken out of the whirlwind, and therefore some think God said it in a still, small voice, which wrought more upon Job (as upon Elijah) than the whirlwind did. Though Job had not spoken any thing, yet God is said to answer him: for he knows men’s thoughts, and can return a fit answer to their silence.

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Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on Job 40:1". Joseph Benson's Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/job-40.html. 1857.

Mark Dunagan Commentary on the Bible

God"s first speech that began with a rebuke and a challenge () also concludes with the same.

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Dunagan, Mark. "Commentary on Job 40:1". "Mark Dunagan Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dun/job-40.html. 1999-2014.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

the LORD. Hebrew. Jehovah. App-4.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Job 40:1". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/job-40.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

Moreover the LORD answered Job, and said,

Job 40:1-24. He had paused for a reply, but Job was silent.

The Lord - Hebrew, Yahweh (Hebrew #3068).

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Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Job 40:1". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/job-40.html. 1871-8.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Moreover the LORD answered Job, and said,
6; 38:1
Reciprocal: Job 11:5 - GeneralJob 16:21 - plead;  Job 23:3 - Oh that

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Job 40:1". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/job-40.html.