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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

John 1:26

John answered them saying, "I baptize in water, but among you stands One whom you do not know.

Adam Clarke Commentary

I baptize with water - See on Mark 1:8; (note). I use the common form, though I direct the baptized to a different end, viz. that they shall repent of their sins, and believe in the Messiah.

There standeth one among you - That is, the person whose forerunner I am is now dwelling in the land of Judea, and will shortly make his appearance among you. Christ was not present when John spoke thus, as may be seen from John 1:29.


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Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on John 1:26". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/john-1.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

I baptize - He did not deny it; nor did he condescend to state his authority. That he had given. He “admitted” that he had introduced an important “change” in the rites of religion, and he goes on to tell them that this was not all. Greater and more important changes would soon take place without their authority. The Messiah was about to come, and the “power” was about to depart from “their” hands.

There standeth one - There is one.

Among you - In the midst of you. He is undistinguished among the multitude. The Messiah had already come, and was about to be manifested to the people. It was not until the next day John 1:29 that Jesus was manifested or proclaimed as the Messiah; but it is not improbable that he was then among the people that were assembled near the Jordan, and mingled with them, though he was undistinguished. He had gone there, probably, with the multitudes that had been drawn thither by the fame of John, and had gone without attracting attention, though his real object was go receive baptism in this public manner, and to be exhibited and proclaimed as the Messiah.

Whom ye know not - Jesus was not yet declared publicly to be the Christ. Though it is probable that he was then among the multitude, yet he was not known as the Messiah. We may hence learn:

1.That there is often great excellency in the world that is obscure, undistinguished, and unknown. Jesus was near to all that people, but they were not conscious of his presence, for he was retired and obscure. Though the greatest personage ever in the world, yet he was not externally distinguished from others.

2.Jesus may be near to men of the world, and yet they know him not. He is everywhere by his Spirit, yet few know it, and few are desirous of knowing it.


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Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on John 1:26". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/john-1.html. 1870.

The Biblical Illustrator

John 1:26

I baptize with water

The baptism of John

If the rite, which the Forerunner of our Lord administered, is not to be considered as a Christian institute, to what dispensation are we to assign it, since it is manifestly no part of the economy of Moses?
The reply is that it was the symbol of a peculiar dispensation, which was neither entirely legal nor Evangelical, but occupied an intermediate station, possessing something of the character and attributes of both; a kind of twilight, equally removed from the obscurity of the first, and the splendour of the last and perfect economy of religion. The light which he emitted, though it greatly surpassed every preceding illumination, was of short duration, being soon eclipsed and extinguished by that ineffable effulgence, before which nothing can retain its splendour
. (Robert Hall.)
.

One among you

Christ among us

1. As to His human nature, as one of yourselves, as He took upon Him the form of man and became the servant of men, and is among you as once He sat in the midst of the doctors in the Temple.

2. As to the Divine nature He is amongst you, for He filleth all in all, and is very nigh to every one.

3. He is among you as the Light which lighteth every man, and as the Word of Wisdom in the heart of all His people.

4. Among you as the Mediator between man and God, and seeking to draw all men to God.

5. Not as the Baptist in the desert, but in the midst of the cities of men.

6. Among you all, for the benefit of all, as the true tree of life in the midst of the garden of this world for the life and for the healing of all. (W. Denton, M. A.)

The unknown presence

We can imagine the Master visiting various spheres in the modern world with the same result.

I. BUSINESS.

II. PLEASURE.

III. THE CHURCH.

IV. AFFLICTION. (H. J. W. Buxton, M. A.)

Christ near yet unperceived

I. THE WORLD’S CREATOR A STRANGER IN HIS OWN DOMINIONS.

1. In part arising from the intentional obscurity that veiled His appearance among man for purposes of their own earthly sovereigns often travel in disguise; but the world has never witnessed so strange an incognito as this. The King of Glory laid aside His robes of light, and in the simple garb of a suffering man, “hid” Himself from the wise and prudent that He might reveal Himself to the lowly and the meek. From His own disciples at times He purposely veiled His identity (John 20:14; Joh_21:4; Luke 24:16; Luk_24:31).

2. Too largely owing to the blinding effect of sin. The other and gentler John affirms the same mysterious but humbling fact, and enumerates the accumulating evidence of its truth. For ages the true Light shined in promise, prophecy, holy law and inward conscience, yet the darkness discovered it not (verse 5). In the fulness of time the Creator came to visit this province of His empire, and was unrecognized upon His own estate (verse 10). More humbling still, when He came to His own possessions His own people received Him not (verse 11). Even those to whom He made Himself known were but imperfectly acquainted with Him.

II. THE IGNORANCE OF MAN CONCERNING THAT WHICH THEY MOST NEED TO KNOW. Ignorance baneful, knowledge beneficial; yet vast numbers are strangers to the source, centre and sum of all wisdom.

1. With some the knowledge of Christ is only indirect; the evidence of vague rumours or the acceptance of testimony; a secondhand knowledge.

2. Personal knowledge exists in varying degrees. Some are only on terms of distant acquaintance; others have occasional communications; others have intimate friendship; with the most loyal and loving Christ sustains confidential relations.

3. To be ignorant of Him is the worst privation man can suffer (2 Corinthians 4:8; 2Co_4:4).

4. When He is known He is admired, loved, trusted and obeyed (chap. 4:10).

III. THE SAVIOUR’S KINDNESS AND COMPASSION IN REVEALING HIMSELF TO THEM THAT SEEK HIM.

1. He has no wish to be unrecognized. He stands, waits, knocks Revelation 3:20).

2. He awaits our entreaty to remove His disguise (Jeremiah 14:5).

3. Once admitted to His friendship we shall grow in intimacy with Him.

4. In His own home hereafter He will show us more and more of His hidden glory. (R. Lewis.)

Christ unrecognized

I. A STARTLING WONDER. Christ unknown.

1. Not from want of evidence then or previously.

2. Not from want of evidence now. In addition to all the above,

II. A STERN NECESSITY. In the knowledge of Him, and in that alone standeth our eternal life. That knowledge is the beginning, the middle and the end of Christianity.

1. The beginning. Christ’s first invitation echoed by His first convert was “Come and see.” Isaiah saw His glory, and was cleansed for service. When Paul saw Christ he became a new man.

2. The continuance. The development of Christian life depends on growing knowledge of Him (2 Peter 3:18; Philip 3:10; Hebrews 12:2; cf. Heb_3:1).

3. Its consummation is in heaven, where we shall see His face, and be like Him, because we shall see Him as He is.

III. A BLESSED OPPORTUNITY. “There standeth.”

1. How?

2. What as?

IV. A FEARFUL ALTERNATIVE.

1. To know Christ is to be known of Him. Christ knows His sheep. He recognizes us when our friends have ceased to do so; when it is difficult to do so; in poverty and obloquy; at the last day.

2. Not to know Christ is to be disowned by Him. “I never knew you.” (J. W. Burn.)

He it is, who, coming after me, is preferred before me

The magnanimity of the Baptist

The world recognizes jealousy as the chief weakness of popular leaders and preachers. Such men are spiritual athletes, who cannot bear a rival. The greatest of popular preachers, the darling of Antioch and Constantinople, admits that he who can overcome this is almost like the disembodied spirits, whose lives, pure as the crystal stream, can never be darkened by any shadow of envy or vainglory. But the leader of a great party in a nation; the founder of a sect, which has vitality enough to live on for years; who was regarded by some as probably the Messiah--that he should have bowed down in prostrate humiliation before a younger successor, this is original indeed. (Bp. Alexander.)

The best servant the most humble

As the lark that soars the highest, builds her nest the lowest; the nightingale that sings the sweetest, sings in the shade when all things rest; the branches that are most laden with ripe fruit, bend lowest; the valleys are fruitful in their lowliness; and the ship most laden sinks deepest in the water, so the holiest Christians are the humblest. (J. Mason.)

Humility not contemptible

Humility did not make John the Baptist contemptible; but when he refused the name of a prophet, Christ said that he was more than a prophet. Humility did not make Moses contemptible; but as he was the mildest man upon earth, so he was the greatest upon earth. Humility did not make David contemptible; but when he humbled himself, he said unto Michal, “I will be more humble yet, and lowly in mine own sight, yet thou and thy maids shall honour me.” As Christ ceased not to be a king because He was like a servant, nor to be a lion because He was a lamb, nor to be a judge because He was judged; so man doth not lose his honour by humility; but he shall be honoured for his humility, as the son was honoured when he was humbled (Luke 15:18-25). Thus humility hath found that which pride sought; like little David, which was least accounted of, and yet got the victory, yea, when no man durst encounter with the giant (1 Samuel 17:28). (Henry Smith.)


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Bibliography
Exell, Joseph S. "Commentary on "John 1:26". The Biblical Illustrator. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tbi/john-1.html. 1905-1909. New York.

Coffman's Commentaries on the Bible

John answered them saying, I baptize in water: in the midst of you standeth one whom ye know not, even he that cometh after me, the latchet of whose shoes I am unworthy to loose.

Hendriksen's comment on this is:

Why does he baptize? He answers that while he administers the sign (water), he does not claim to be able to bestow the thing signified (the Holy Spirit). That is Messiah's high prerogative, and that glorious One has even now arrived upon the scene of Israel's history, though they have not recognized him.[38]

Such a comment misses the point. John was answering the question of why he was baptizing; but, if Hendriksen's comment is what John meant, he did not answer the question at all. The thought that "Well, my baptism is only a sign" is no reason at all for baptizing, but is rather a good reason for not baptizing! It will be noted that there is no reference to the Holy Spirit in this passage.

I baptize in water ... Note that it was IN, not WITH, water that John baptized, indicating immersion as the action which constituted baptism. John repeated the fact already mentioned by his questioners that he was baptizing people, and then he told them why he was baptizing. Why was it? The Messiah had already arrived but had not yet been publicly revealed. Hence, it was appropriate that the herald should be about the business of cleansing the nation through repentance and baptism, that being God's way of making ready a people prepared to receive the Messiah. The concise answer of why John was baptizing is in the last clause of this verse, "In the midst of you standeth one whom ye know not."

ENDNOTE:

[38] William Hendriksen, op. cit., p. 97.


Copyright Statement
James Burton Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.

Bibliography
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on John 1:26". "Coffman Commentaries on the Old and New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/john-1.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

John answered them, saying, I baptize with water,.... Or in water, so the Vulgate Latin, and all the Oriental versions render it. The sense of the answer is, that he indeed baptized persons in water, which was all that he could do, or pretended to do; and he owned, that this was a new rite, and that he was the administrator of a new ordinance; but he suggests, as may be supplied from Matthew 3:11 that there was one at hand, and even now among them, that should baptize, and so it is read in one of Stephens's copies here, in the Holy Ghost, and in fire; and it was by his authority, by a commission he had received from him, that he baptized in water; and that his speedy manifestation and appearance as the Messiah, which would be confirmed by his power of baptizing in the Holy Ghost, and by his ministry and miracles, would be a sufficient vindication of his conduct, and support him in his administration of water baptism:

but there standeth one among you; or "hath stood", as the Vulgate Latin version renders it; referring, not to his being among them at twelve years of age, but a few days ago when he came to John to be baptized, and was baptized by him; for from John 1:29 it is plain he was not now, or "today", as Nounus expresses it, standing in the midst of them. The Ethiopic version renders it, there is one about to stand among you, as he did the next day: though the meaning of the phrase may only be, that he was then in being, and dwelt somewhere among them, and not that he was personally present at that time:

whom ye know not; neither from whence he is, nor who he is, or what is his work and office; neither the dignity of his person, nor the end of his coming into the world, nor the nature of his business in it.


Copyright Statement
The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on John 1:26". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/john-1.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

John answered them, saying, I baptize with water: but there standeth one m among you, whom ye know not;

(m) Whom all the world sees, and sees even amongst you.

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Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on John 1:26". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/john-1.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

there standeth — This must have been spoken after the baptism of Christ, and possibly just after His temptation (see on John 1:29).


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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on John 1:26". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/john-1.html. 1871-8.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

In the midst of you standeth (μεσος υμων στηκειmesos humōn stēkei). Adjective as in John 19:18, not εν μεσωι υμωνen mesōi humōn Present active indicative of late verb στηκωstēkō from perfect stem εστηκαhestēka John had already baptized Jesus and recognized him as the Messiah.

Whom ye know not (ον υμεις ουκ οιδατεhon humeis ouk oidate). This was the tragedy of the situation (John 1:11). Apparently this startling declaration excited no further inquiry from the committee.


Copyright Statement
The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)

Bibliography
Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on John 1:26". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/john-1.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Vincent's Word Studies

I baptize with water: but there standeth

The best texts omit but; so that the two clauses illustrate John's characteristic parallelism, and bring out the sharp contrast between the Baptist and his successor.

Among you ( μέσος ὑμῶν )

The Greek idiom is a mid one in respect of you. Ἑγὼ , I, and μέσος , a mid one, stand respectively at the head of the parallel clauses, thus emphasizing the two contrasted parties.

Standeth ( ἕστηκεν )

The best texts read στήκει , a verb which is kindred to ἕστηκεν , but with the added sense of firm, persistent standing. Thus, stand fast (1 Corinthians 16:13; Galatians 5:1: Philemon 1:27). The verb emphasizes the firm, dignified attitude of Christ.

Ye know not ( ὑμεῖς )

Emphatic.


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The text of this work is public domain.

Bibliography
Vincent, Marvin R. DD. "Commentary on John 1:26". "Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/vnt/john-1.html. Charles Schribner's Sons. New York, USA. 1887.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

John answered them, saying, I baptize with water: but there standeth one among you, whom ye know not;

John answered, I baptize — To prepare for the Messiah; and indeed to show that Jews, as well as Gentiles, must be proselytes to Christ, and that these as well as those stand in need of being washed from their sins.


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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.

Bibliography
Wesley, John. "Commentary on John 1:26". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/john-1.html. 1765.

The Fourfold Gospel

And they asked him, and said unto him, Why then baptizest thou, if thou art not the Christ, neither Elijah1, neither the prophet?

  1. Why then baptizest thou, if thou art not the Christ, neither Elijah,
  2. neither the prophet? If you are no more important personage, who do you presume to introduce any other ordinance than those provided for by the law of Moses? The question shows that to them John's baptism was a new rite. Even if proselyte baptism then existed at this time (of which there is certainly no sufficient evidence), it differed in two marked ways from John's baptism: (1) John baptized his converts, while proselytes baptized themselves; (2) John baptized Jews and not Gentiles.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website. These files were made available by Mr. Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.

Bibliography
J. W. McGarvey and Philip Y. Pendleton. "Commentary on John 1:26". "The Fourfold Gospel". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tfg/john-1.html. Standard Publishing Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 1914.

Abbott's Illustrated New Testament

There standeth one among you; that is, there is one now living among you.


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Bibliography
Abbott, John S. C. & Abbott, Jacob. "Commentary on John 1:26". "Abbott's Illustrated New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ain/john-1.html. 1878.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

26.I baptize with water. This ought to have been abundantly sufficient for the correction of their mistake, but a reproof otherwise clear is of no advantage to the deaf; for, when he sends them to Christ, and declares that Christ is present, this is a clear proof not only that he was divinely appointed to be a minister of Christ, but that he is the true Elijah, who is sent to testify that the time is come (36) for the renovation of the Church. There is a contrast here which is not fully stated; for the spiritual baptism of Christ is not expressly contrasted with the external baptism of John, but that latter clause about the baptism of the Spirit might easily be supplied, and shortly afterwards both are set down by the Evangelist.

This answer may be reduced to two heads: first, that John claims nothing for himself but what he has a right to claim, because he has Christ for the Author of his baptism, in which consists the truth of the sign; and, secondly, that he has nothing but the administration of the outward sign, while the whole power and efficacy is in the hands of Christ alone. Thus he defends his baptism so far as its truth depends on anything else; but, at the same time, by declaring that he has not the power of the Spirit, he exalts the dignity of Christ, that the eyes of men may be fixed on him alone. This is the highest and best regulated moderation, when a minister borrows from Christ whatever authority he claims for himself, in such a manner as to trace it to him, ascribing to him alone all that he possesses.

It is a foolish mistake, however, into which some people have been led, of supposing that John’s baptism was different from ours; for John does not argue here about the advantage and usefulness of his baptism, but merely compares his own person with the person of Christ. In like manner, if we were inquiring, at the present day, what part belongs to us, and what belongs to Christ, in baptism, we must acknowledge that Christ alone performs what baptism figuratively represents, and that we have nothing beyond the bare administration of the sign. There is a twofold way of speaking in Scripture about the sacraments; for sometimes it tells us that they are the laver of regeneration, (Titus 3:5;) that by them our sins are washed away, (1 Peter 3:21;) that we

are in-grafted into the body of Christ, that our old man is crucified, and that we rise again to newness of life, (Romans 6:4;)

and, in those cases, Scripture joins the power of Christ with the ministry of man; as, indeed, man is nothing else than the hand of Christ. Such modes of expression show, not what man can of himself accomplish, but what Christ performs by man, and by the sign, as his instruments. But as there is a strong tendency to fall into superstition, and as men, through the pride which is natural to them, take from God the honor due to him, and basely appropriate it to themselves; so Scripture, in order to restrain this blasphemous arrogance, sometimes distinguishes ministers from Christ, as in this passage, that we may learn that ministers are nothing and can do nothing.

One standeth in the midst of you. He indirectly charges them with stupidity, in not knowing Christ, to whom their minds ought to have been earnestly directed; and he always insists earnestly on this point, that nothing can be known about his ministry, until men have come to him who is the Author of it. When he says that Christ standeth in the midst of, them, it is that he may excite their desire and their exertion to know him. The amount of what he says is, that he wishes to place himself as low as possible, lest any degree of honor improperly bestowed on him might obscure the excellence of Christ. It is probable that he had these sentences frequently in his mouth, when he saw himself immoderately extolled by the perverse opinions of men.


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Bibliography
Calvin, John. "Commentary on John 1:26". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/john-1.html. 1840-57.

James Nisbet's Church Pulpit Commentary

THE UNKNOWN CHRIST

‘There standeth One among you, Whom ye know not.… The same is He that baptizeth with the Holy Ghost.’

John 1:26; John 1:33

Is the charge still true. Is Christ still unknown in His special prerogative as He that baptizeth with the Holy Ghost?

I. Christ is not an absent force.—He is unseen. His bodily presence is removed from us for a time, but He is still in our midst the Captain of our Salvation, the Leader and Commander of His people. But just as among the crowd that gathered on the banks of Jordan the Carpenter of Nazareth was unrecognised, and few realised the new and immense spiritual leverage that was for them in Jesus Christ, so it is still very often in the present day. Historically He is better known, we worship Him as the Christ, the Messiah of God. Theologically we know Him and acknowledge His Godhead, His mediatorial work, His sacrificial death, His glorious Resurrection and Ascension. But practically He stands is the midst unrecognised, unknown, unsought.

II. With the outside world we are not surprised to find it so.—They have left no room for Christ in their counsels. It would interfere with their gambling and money-making. It suits them better to pretend that Christianity is a spent force, that the teaching of Christ is old-fashioned, a beautiful ideal, but quite impossible under present circumstances.

III. But what about the Christian Churches?—Surely they know that the living Christ is among them waiting to baptize with the Holy Ghost and with fire? The Apostles, in the Holy War they waged against sin and heathenism and corrupt Judaism, only knew two remedies for human depravity, the Blood of the Lamb and the Fire of the Holy Ghost. But the Church of the twentieth century is getting ashamed of the blood and fire of the Gospel of Christ; her confidence is being placed in intellectual attainments, and so, though there never was so much Christian enterprise as in the present day, it is too much on the human level; there is so little of the supernatural, so little of the power of the Holy Ghost, in it, and even our Christian workers seem to forget the Christ Who stands among us waiting to baptize with the Holy Ghost.

IV. There is often the same lack in the daily life and experience of God’s children.—Their present life is full of weakness and failure, of sadness and complaint. And yet Christ is among them, able to save to the uttermost, waiting to baptize with the Holy Ghost. But, alas! they see Him not.

—Rev. F. S. Webster.


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Bibliography
Nisbet, James. "Commentary on John 1:26". Church Pulpit Commentary. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cpc/john-1.html. 1876.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

26 John answered them, saying, I baptize with water: but there standeth one among you, whom ye know not;

Ver. 26. I baptize with water] The Baptist here meaneth the same that St Paul doth, 1 Corinthians 3:6-7. {See Trapp on "Matthew 3:11"} Christ rains down righteousness upon all his baptized; to whom it is not only a sign, but also a seal, as circumcision is called, not only by St Paul, Romans 4:11, but also by a Jewish doctor, more ancient than their Talmud. Of Wilfride, first Bishop of Chichester, A.D. 700, it is reported that he converted to the faith many pagans in those parts. And a day being appointed for their baptism, they had no sooner received the same, but immediately it rained plentifully, the want whereof had caused a dearth for three years before; so that many died daily for hunger, and serveral joining hand-in-hand (forty or fifty in a company) threw themselves headlong into the sea.


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Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on John 1:26". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/john-1.html. 1865-1868.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

John 1:26. ΄έσος(30)) ὑμῶν, in the midst of you) especially at the time of His baptism.— ἕστηκεν) Hath taken His stand [statuit sese].— οὐκ οἴδατε, ye know not) He addresses the inhabitants of Jerusalem, who had not been present at the baptism of Jesus: and he whets their desires, that they may be anxious to become acquainted with Him.


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Bibliography
Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on John 1:26". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/john-1.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

This was no strict answer to their question, which was not, how, but why he baptized? But proper replies are often called answers in Scripture, though not apposite to the question.

I baptize with water; I baptize you with mere water:

but there standeth one among you, whom ye know not; but there hath stood one amongst you, esthken, or (by a usual putting of one tense for another) there standeth one; Christ had been there with the crowd, Luke 3:15,21, and possibly was amongst them still when John spake these words; whom you know not, not so much as ore tenus, by face.


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Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on John 1:26". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/john-1.html. 1685.

Justin Edwards' Family Bible New Testament

With water; in distinction from the baptism of the Holy Ghost, which Christ shall bestow. See Matthew 3:11.


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Bibliography
Edwards, Justin. "Commentary on John 1:26". "Family Bible New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/fam/john-1.html. American Tract Society. 1851.

Cambridge Greek Testament for Schools and Colleges

26. The Baptist’s words seem scarcely a reply to the question. Perhaps the connexion is—‘You ask for my credentials; and all the while He who is far more than credentials to me is among you.’

ἐν ὕδατι. In water: note the preposition here and John 1:26; John 1:33.


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Bibliography
"Commentary on John 1:26". "Cambridge Greek Testament for Schools and Colleges". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cgt/john-1.html. 1896.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

26. I baptize with water—John’s answer is very pertinent. My baptism is the symbol and precursor of a real baptism by the great Baptizer.

Standeth one among you—Not necessary that he was at that moment there standing; but that he was then living and being among the people, to them unknown.


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Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on John 1:26". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/john-1.html. 1874-1909.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Hath stood. St. John the Baptist, by these words, which he spoke to the priests and Levites, sent to him by the Pharisees, did not mean to tell them, that Jesus was either at the present time standing amongst them, or that he had ever been in the presence of the self same people; but they may be understood two different ways, either with regard to his divinity; an din that sense, Jesus was always by his divine presence amongst them; or in regard to his humanity; either that he lived in the same country, and among their countrymen, or, that he stood actually amongst them, because Jesus was accustomed yearly to go up to Jerusalem on the festival of the Pasch. (Denis the Carthusian)


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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on John 1:26". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/john-1.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

baptize with. App-115.

know. Greek. oida. App-132. A characteristic

word of this Gospel. See p. 1511.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on John 1:26". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/john-1.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

John answered them, saying, I baptize with water: but there standeth one among you, whom ye know not;

John answered them, saying, I baptize with water - with water only; the higher, internal, baptism with the Holy Spirit being the exclusive prerogative of his Master. (See the note at Matthew 3:11.)

But there standeth one among you, whom ye know not. This must have been spoken after Christ's Baptism, and probably almost immediately after it.


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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on John 1:26". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/john-1.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(26) I baptize with water.—The passage of Ezekiel is probably present to the mind, with its contrast between water and spirit.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
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Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on John 1:26". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/john-1.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

John answered them, saying, I baptize with water: but there standeth one among you, whom ye know not;
I
Matthew 3:11; Mark 1:8; Luke 3:16; Acts 1:5; 11:16
whom
10,11; 8:19; 16:3; 17:3,25; Malachi 3:1,2; 1 John 3:1

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on John 1:26". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/john-1.html.

Lectionary Calendar
Wednesday, October 16th, 2019
the Week of Proper 23 / Ordinary 28
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