Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

John 13:33

Little children, I am with you a little while longer. You will seek Me; and as I said to the Jews, now I also say to you, ‘Where I am going, you cannot come.'
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Jesus Continued;   Thompson Chain Reference - Christ;   Departure Foretold;   Divinity;   Divinity-Humanity;   Foreknowledge;   The Topic Concordance - Commandment;   Disciples/apostles;   Examples;   Love;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Titles and Names of Saints;  
Dictionaries:
Fausset Bible Dictionary - John, the Gospel According to;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Foot;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Announcements of Death;   Ascension (2);   Children;   Coming to Christ;   Foresight;   Gentleness (2);   Little Ones;   Son of God;   Time (2);   Upper Room (2);   The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Judas;   Passover;  
Encyclopedias:
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Child;   Comfortless;  
Devotionals:
Every Day Light - Devotion for November 17;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

Little children - Or, rather, beloved children. Τεκνια, a word frequently used by this apostle in his epistles. It is an expression which implies great tenderness and affection, and such as a fond mother uses to her most beloved babes. Now that Judas was gone out, he could use this epithet without any restriction of meaning.

Yet a little while - The end of my life is at hand; Judas is gone to consummate his treason; I have but a few hours to be with you, and you shall be by and by scattered.

Ye shall seek me - For a few days ye shall feel great distress because of my absence.

Whither I go, ye cannot come - Your time is not up. The Jews shall die in their sins, martyrs to their infidelity; but ye shall die in the truth, martyrs for your Lord.

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Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on John 13:33". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/john-13.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Little children - An expression of great tenderness, denoting his deep interest in their welfare. As he was about to leave them, he endeavors to mitigate their grief by the most tender expressions of attachment, showing that he felt for them the deep interest in their welfare which a parent feels for his children. The word “children” is often given to Christians as implying:

1.that God is their Father, and that they sustain toward him that endearing relation, Romans 8:14-15.

2.as denoting their need of teaching and guidance, as children need the aid and counsel of a father. See the corresponding term “babes” used in 1 Corinthians 3:1; 1 Peter 2:2.

3.It is used, as it is here, as an expression of tenderness and affection. See Galatians 4:19; 1 John 2:1, 1 John 2:12, 1 John 2:28; 1 John 3:7, 1 John 3:18; 1 John 4:4; 1 John 5:21.

Yet a little while I am with you - He did not conceal the fact that he was soon to leave them. There is something exceedingly tender in this address. It shows that he loved them to the end; that as their friend and guide, as a man, he felt deeply at the thoughts of parting from them, and leaving them to a cold and unfeeling world. A parting scene at death is always one of tenderness; and it is well when, like this, there is the presence of the Savior to break the agony of the parting pang, and to console us with the words of his grace.

As I said unto the Jews - See John 7:34.

So now I say to you - That is, they could not follow him then, John 13:36; John 14:2. He was about to die and return to God, and for a time they must be willing to be separated from him. But he consoled them John 13:36 with the assurance that the separation would be only temporary, and that they should afterward follow him.

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on John 13:33". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/john-13.html. 1870.

The Biblical Illustrator

John 13:33

(See Dr. Maclaren’s sermon on John 7:33-34).

Little Children.--

Needing

I. CARE.

II. INSTRUCTION.

III. GUIDANCE.

IV. PROTECTION. (S. S. Times.)

Whither I go, ye cannot come … now.--

I. A picture of THE CHRISTIAN’S PRESENT CONDITION.

II. A promise of THE CHRISTIAN’S FUTURE DEVELOPMENT. (S. S. Times.)

The conditions of being with Christ

Just as these friends of Christ, though they loved Him very truly, and understood Him a little, were a long way from being ready to follow Him, and needed the schooling of the Cross, and Olivet, and Pentecost, as well as the discipline of life and toil, before they were fully ripe for the harvest, so we, for the most part, have to pass through analogous training before we are prepared for the place which Christ has prepared for us. Certainly, so soon as a heart has trusted Christ, it is capable of entering where He is, and the real reason why the disciples could not come where He went was that they did not yet clearly know Him as the Divine Sacrifice for theirs and the world’s sins, and, however much they believed in Him as Messiah, had not yet, nor could have, the knowledge on which they could found their trust in Him as their Saviour. But, while that is true, it is also true that each advance in the grace and knowledge of our Lord and Saviour will bring with it capacity to advance further into the heart of the far-off land, and to see more of the King in His beauty. So, as long as His friends were wrapped in such dark clouds of misconception and error, as long as their Christian characters were so imperfect and incomplete as they were at the time of my text being spoken, they could not go thither and follow Him. But it was a diminishing impossibility, and day by day they approximated more and more to His likeness, because they understood Him more, and trusted Him more, and loved Him more, and grew towards Him, and, therefore, day by day became more and more able to enter into that kingdom. (A. Maclaren,, D. D.)

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Exell, Joseph S. "Commentary on "John 13:33". The Biblical Illustrator. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tbi/john-13.html. 1905-1909. New York.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

Little children, yet a little while I am with you. Ye shall seek me: and as I said unto the Jews, Whither I go ye cannot come; so now I say unto you.

Little children ... is found nowhere else in the Gospels and was used here, perhaps, for the first time by the Lord. This tender address and the circumstances under which it was used endeared the words to John who made them a permanent part of his vocabulary (1 John 2:1,12,18,28 etc.).

As I said unto the Jews ... See John 7:34 and John 8:21,22. In those instances, Jesus referred to the eternal impossibility of wicked men having fellowship with himself; but here he referred to the temporary separation of the Lord from the disciples by reason of his approaching death and departure to the heavenly world. As Hovey noted:

In going to his Father through the dreadful pathway of death, he would enter upon a life distinct from the present, and inaccessible to his own in their earthly state. In view of this impending separation, he proceeded to enjoin them to love one another.[9]

ENDNOTE:

[9] Alvah Hovey, Commentary on John (Philadelphia: American Baptist Publication Society, 1885), p. 277.

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Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
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Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on John 13:33". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/john-13.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Little children, yet a little while I am with you,.... Christ having removed the scandal of his death, by observing, that both he and his Father would be glorified by it, begins more freely to open his mind to his disciples, and acquaint them with it; whom he addresses in the most kind, tender, and affectionate manner, "little children", expressing the relation which subsisted between them, of which he was not unmindful; his great affection for them, his consideration of their weakness, and sympathy with them on that account; who were very ill able to bear his departure, which he now thought high time to acquaint them with, that it would be very shortly: it was but a little while he was to be with them, a few days more; the time of his departure was at hand, his hour was as it were come, and the last sands were dropping:

ye shall seek me; as persons in distress, under great concern, not knowing what to do, or where to go:

and as I said unto the Jews, John 7:33;

whither I go ye cannot come, so now I say unto you; but with this difference, whereas the unbelieving Jews, who died in their sins, could never come whither he went, these his disciples, though they could not come now, yet they should hereafter, all of them, as well as Peter, John 13:36.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on John 13:33". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/john-13.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

4 Little children, yet a little while I am with you. Ye shall seek me: and as I said unto the Jews, Whither I go, ye cannot come; so now I say to you.

(4) The eternal glory will flow little by little from the head into the members. But meanwhile, we must take good heed that we run the race of this life in brotherly love.
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Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on John 13:33". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/john-13.html. 1599-1645.

John Lightfoot's Commentary on the Gospels

33. Little children, yet a little while I am with you. Ye shall seek me: and as I said unto the Jews, Whither I go, ye cannot come; so now I say to you.

[Little children.] "'Behold, I and the children whom the Lord hath given me,' Isaiah 8:18. Were they indeed his sons, or were they not rather his disciples? Hence you may learn that any one's disciple is called his son." Nor is it unlikely but that Christ in calling his disciples here My little children might have an eye to that place in Isaiah: for when the traitor, the son of perdition, had removed himself from them, he could then properly enough say, "Behold, I and the children which thou hast given me."

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Lightfoot, John. "Commentary on John 13:33". "John Lightfoot Commentary on the Gospels". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jlc/john-13.html. 1675.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

Little children (τεκνιαteknia). Diminutive of τεκναtekna and affectionate address as Jesus turns to the effect of his going on these disciples. Only here in this Gospel, but common in 1John (1 John 2:1, etc.), and nowhere else in N.T.

Yet a little while (ετι μικρονeti mikron). Accusative of extent of time. See also John 7:33; John 8:21 (to which Jesus here refers); John 16:16-19.

So now I say unto you
(και υμιν λεγω αρτιkai humin legō arti). This juncture point (αρτιarti) of time relatively to the past and the future (John 9:25; John 16:12, John 16:31).

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The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)
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Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on John 13:33". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/john-13.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Vincent's Word Studies

Little children ( τεκνία )

Diminutive, occurring only here in the Gospel, but repeatedly in the First Epistle. Nowhere else in the New Testament.

Now ( ἄρτι )

In John 13:31, now is νῦν , which marks the point of time absolutely. Ἄρτι marks the point of time as related to the past or to the future. Thus, “from the days of John the Baptist until now ” ( ἄρτι , Matthew 11:12). “Thinkest thou that I cannot now ( ἄρτι ) pray to my Father?” though succor has been delayed all along till now (Matthew 26:53). Here the word implies that the sorrowful announcement of Jesus' departure from His disciples had been withheld until the present. The time was now come.

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Vincent, Marvin R. DD. "Commentary on John 13:33". "Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/vnt/john-13.html. Charles Schribner's Sons. New York, USA. 1887.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

Little children, yet a little while I am with you. Ye shall seek me: and as I said unto the Jews, Whither I go, ye cannot come; so now I say to you.

Ye cannot come — Not yet; being not yet ripe for it. John 7:34.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
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Wesley, John. "Commentary on John 13:33". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/john-13.html. 1765.

The Fourfold Gospel

Little children1, yet a little while I am with you. Ye shall seek me2: and as I said unto the Jews, Whither I go, ye cannot come; so now I say unto you.
    John 13:33-35

  1. Little children. In the term of tenderness with which Jesus opens this paragraph, we see one of the marks of love referred to by John (John 13:1). It is found nowhere else in the Gospels. In the light of his near separation Jesus looked upon his apostles as about to be made orphan children.

  2. Ye shall seek me, etc. See John 13:1.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website. These files were made available by Mr. Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.
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J. W. McGarvey and Philip Y. Pendleton. "Commentary on John 13:33". "The Fourfold Gospel". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tfg/john-13.html. Standard Publishing Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 1914.

Abbott's Illustrated New Testament

As I said unto the Jews; John 7:33,34,8:21.

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Abbott, John S. C. & Abbott, Jacob. "Commentary on John 13:33". "Abbott's Illustrated New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ain/john-13.html. 1878.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

Дети! недолго уже быть. Уход Учителя не мог не опечалить Его учеников. Поэтому Христос заранее говорит, что не будет с ними долго, и одновременно призывает к терпению. Наконец, чтобы унять их неуместный пыл, Он подчеркивает: они не смогут сразу же последовать за Ним. Называя их «детьми», Он как бы учит этим ласковым словом: Я не потому ухожу от вас, что не забочусь о вашем спасении; напротив, Я нежнейшим образом вас люблю. Христос облекся в нашу плоть, чтобы стать нашим братом, но в этом другом Его имени еще больше выражается пламенность любви. То же, что Христос повторил ученикам ранее сказанное Иудеям, верно в отношении слов, но не в отношении смысла. Он отрицает, что они могут последовать за Ним, дабы научить их спокойно сносить Его временное отсутствие. Он словно налагает на них узду, дабы они довольствовались своим положением, доколе не завершат пребывание в этом мире. Итак, Христос не навечно отлучает их от Царства Божия, как Иудеев, но лишь повелевает спокойно ожидать, доколе не возьмет их с Собой в небесную обитель.

 

 

 

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Calvin, John. "Commentary on John 13:33". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/john-13.html. 1840-57.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

33 Little children, yet a little while I am with you. Ye shall seek me: and as I said unto the Jews, Whither I go, ye cannot come; so now I say to you.

Ver. 33. Little children, yet a little while] Here our Saviour useth the self-same words to his apostles, which before he had used to the Jews, with whom he was angry; so to cut off all hope from them of his corporeal presence. The fiction of the ubiquity began about the time of Berengarius; was fostered and furthered by Gerson, Chancellor of Paris, who first taught the real communication of properties, by means whereof the human nature of Christ received this prerogative, said he, that at his supper (and then only) it might be in many places at once, wheresoever the supper was celebrated. But in the year of Christ 1524 Jacobus Faber Staupulensis taught at Paris, that by the same reason Christ might be as well corporally present in all places at once, as he was at the supper. For which doctrine of the ubiquity he was opposed the year following by one Natalis Beda, and by the Sorbonists banished out of France. This is the nativity of that famous ubiquity, which being cast out of France, Luther brought back into the Churches of Germany; Brentius furbished it over, and Smidelinus obtruded it upon many places and persons, whether they would or not; whence he is surnamed, Ubiquitatis Apostolus, Omnipresent Apostle. How much better that good woman in the Book of Martyrs, that being asked by the bishops, "Dost thou believe that the body of Christ is in the sacrament really and substantially?" "I believe," said she, "that that is a real lie, and a substantial lie." Domitius Calderinus, the Italian, who flourished in the year 1442, when he was called by his friends to go to mass, was wont to say (as Vives tells us), Eamus ad communem errorem, Let us go to the common error.

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on John 13:33". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/john-13.html. 1865-1868.

Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament

Observe here, An endearing compellation, a sweet title given by Christ to his disciples, Little Children; intimating that tender affection which he bears unto them, though now upon the point of departing from them.

Learn thence, That whatever Christ's dealings are, or may be with his people, in respect to his removing or withdrawing from them, yet he still retains the relation of a Father to them, and will in his absence from them, exercise such a care over them, as parents have of their young and tender children; so much doth the title of little children imply and import.

Observe farther, The plain intimation which our Saviour gives to his disciples of his death's being very nigh, (for it was the very next day) he tells them he is going to heaven; and whither he went, they could not come: that is, not presently; they should follow him their forerunner, afterwards; but at present he had a great deal of work for them to do, though his own work was done; and till they had finished their work, whither he went they could not come.

Learn hence, That though it be rest which the saints may lawfully desire, an everlasting rest with Christ in glory, yet must they not refuse to labour, whilst their Lord will have it so. Till their work be done, whither Christ is gone they cannot come: Ye shall seek me; but whither I go, at present, ye cannot come.

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Burkitt, William. "Commentary on John 13:33". Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wbc/john-13.html. 1700-1703.

Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary

33.] τεκνίαhere only used by Christ—affectingly expresses His not only brotherly, but fatherly love (Isaiah 9:6) for His own, and at the same time their immature and weak state, now about to be left without Him.

καθὼς εἶπ.] “Noluit discipulis citius hoc dicere: infidelibus dixit citius.” Bengel. But naturally the two clauses, ‘Ye shall seek Me and not find Me, and shall die in your sins,’ also spoken to the Jews (ch. John 7:33; John 8:21), are here omitted: and by this omission the connexion with John 13:34 is supplied;—‘Ye shall be left here: but, unlike the Jews, ye shall seek Me and shall find Me, and the way is that of Love,—to Me, and to one another (so Stier, ver. 140 ff. edn. 2)—forming (John 13:35) an united Body, the Church, in which all shall recognize My presence among you as My disciples.’

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Alford, Henry. "Commentary on John 13:33". Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hac/john-13.html. 1863-1878.

Heinrich Meyer's Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament

John 13:33. The εὐθύς changes—when He glances at His loved ones, whom He is to leave behind

His mood, which but now was that of victory, again into one of softness and emotion. Here, in the first place, the tender τεκνία (comp. John 21:5) with all the intensity of departing love.

μικρόν] Accusat. neut. Comp. John 14:16, John 16:19; Hebrews 10:37; LXX. Job 36:2; Sap. John 15:8, et al.

ζητήσετε] the seeking of faith and love in distress, in temptation, etc.

καὶ καθὼς, κ. τ. λ.] and as I have said, … say I now also to you.(133)

τ. ἰουδ.] to these, however, with a penal reference, John 7:34, John 8:21; John 8:24, and with the threatening addition, κ. οὐχ εὑρήσετε. And for the disciples the οὐ δύνασθε ἐλθεῖν is intended only of the temporal impossibility. See John 14:2-3.

ἄρτι] emphatically at the end, as in John 13:7; John 13:37; John 16:12. He could no longer spare them the announcement.

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Meyer, Heinrich. "Commentary on John 13:33". Heinrich Meyer's Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hmc/john-13.html. 1832.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

John 13:33. τέκνια, little children) In this passage, when putting forward the precept of love, He for the first time so calls them. Comp. ch. John 21:5.(339)τοῖς ἰουδαίοις, unto the Jews) In this one passage alone, when speaking with the disciples, He calls them Jews, never on any other occasion, except to the Samaritan woman, to Caiaphas, and to Pilate, once only to each of these persons; ch. John 4:22; John 18:20; John 18:36. Also in chapters 14–17. He never uses the appellation, Jews or Israel.— ζητήσετέ με, ye shall seek Me) He does not add, ye shall not find Me [as He did to the Jews].— οὐ δύνασθε, ye cannot) They were not as yet matured enough for that: John 13:36, “Whither I go, thou canst not follow Me now; but thou shalt follow Me afterwards.”— ἄρτι, now) He was unwilling to say this to the disciples sooner: whereas to unbelievers He said it sooner [at an earlier period].

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Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on John 13:33". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/john-13.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Our Saviour’s time of death being very nigh, (for it was the next day), he begins to speak of it to his disciples more freely and plainly, and to let them know that he, though now dying, bare a fatherly tender affection to them: he calls them little children. Parents have a natural affection to their children; a more tender affection to their children when little, because in their tender age they are more ignorant, and unable to provide for themselves. We find this compellation used by Christ’s apostles, Galatians 4:19 1 John 2:1,28. And he tells them, that he had but now a little time to be with them before his death, and not long after his resurrection; in which, too, his converse was not such with them as it hitherto had been.

Whither I go, ye cannot come; he told this to the Jews in John 7:31, and now he tells them the same, that they would miss him when he was gone, and should seek him; but even the disciples at present could not follow him to heaven, whither he was going. The unbelieving Jews should never follow him thither, but even those who were his disciples, who were born again, and whom he loved as little children are beloved by their parents, should not yet follow him; his work in the world was done, but they had yet a great deal of work in it to do.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on John 13:33". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/john-13.html. 1685.

Justin Edwards' Family Bible New Testament

As I said; chap John 7:34.

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Edwards, Justin. "Commentary on John 13:33". "Family Bible New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/fam/john-13.html. American Tract Society. 1851.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

33.Little children—In presence of the stupendous events now transpiring they were indeed as little children, very infants. And as they were to be left by him, whose parent-like protection had thus far been over them, it is with exquisite tenderness that he applies to them this title; a title which John, as if impressed by the memory, repeats in his epistles.

A little while—For the work was to be accomplished, as said in the last verse, straightway; in the course of a few hours.

Unto the JewsJohn 7:34. This he had said to the Jews in wrath, but to these in love.

 

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on John 13:33". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/john-13.html. 1874-1909.

Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable

Glorification for Jesus involved temporary separation from His believing disciples. Jesus used a tender term for His disciples that showed His strong affection for them as members of His family. "Little children" (Gr. teknia, dear children) occurs only here in the fourth Gospel, but John used it seven times in1John mirroring Jesus" compassionate spirit ( 1 John 2:1; 1 John 2:12; 1 John 2:28; 1 John 3:7; 1 John 3:18; 1 John 4:4; 1 John 5:21; cf. Galatians 4:19). Death and ascension to heaven would separate Jesus from them.

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Constable, Thomas. DD. "Commentary on John 13:33". "Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dcc/john-13.html. 2012.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

John 13:33. Little children, yet a little while I am with you. For them there is separation from Him, and the thought of its nearness lends more than ordinary tenderness to the words of Jesus. He calls them ‘little children,’ a term found nowhere in the New Testament, except here and in the First Epistle of John (chap. 1 John 2:1; 1 John 2:12; 1 John 2:28, 1 John 3:7; 1 John 3:18, 1 John 4:4, 1 John 5:21); for the more probable reading of Galatians 4:19 is simply ‘children.’

Ye shall seek me: and even as I said onto the Jews, Whither I go away, ye cannot come; so now I say to you. These words had been spoken to the Jews at chaps. John 7:34, John 8:21. It is remarkable that, formerly addressed to determined enemies, they should now be addressed to beloved disciples. Yet we are probably to seek for no other basis of the common thought than this, that the ‘going away’ of Jesus involved His separation from the community of human life, from friends therefore no less than foes. The desolate state in which the disciples would thus be left, and, not less than this, the greater responsibility that would then rest upon them to carry out the work of Jesus, prepare the way for the words that follow.

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Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on John 13:33". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/john-13.html. 1879-90.

The Expositor's Greek Testament

John 13:33. This result was to be forthwith achieved: , which at once is interpreted to the discipies in the explicit statement , . is frequent in 1 John; here only in the Gospel. Lightfoot (p. 1098) says: “Discipulus cujusvis vocatur ejus filius”; but here there is a tenderness in the expression not so accounted for. , “yet a little,” i.e., it is only for a little longer; cf.John 7:33. This announcement, formerly made to the Jews (John 7:33, John 8:21; John 8:24), He now, , makes to the disciples; arousing their attention to what follows, as His last injunctions. In view of the temper they had that evening displayed and the necessity for united action and unanimous testimony He first lays upon them the commandment to love one another.

 

 

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Nicol, W. Robertson, M.A., L.L.D. "Commentary on John 13:33". The Expositor's Greek Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/john-13.html. 1897-1910.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

Little children. Greek teknion. App-108. Only occurance here, Galatians 1:4, Galatians 1:19 (where the reading is doubtful), and in John"s first Epistle.

a little while. Compare John 7:33, John 7:34; John 14:19; John 16:16-19.

as = even as.

the Jews. The Lord uses this expression only here, John 4:22; John 18:20; John 18:36.

cannot come = are not (Greek. ou. App-105) able to come. The third time He said these words. Compare John 7:34; John 8:21.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on John 13:33". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/john-13.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

Little children, yet a little while I am with you. Ye shall seek me: and as I said unto the Jews, Whither I go, ye cannot come; so now I say to you.

Little children, [ teknia (Greek #5040)]. From the height of His own glory He now descends, with sweet pity, to His "little children," all now His own. This term of endearment, nowhere else used in the Gospels, and once only employed by Paul (Galatians 4:19), is appropriated by the beloved disciple himself, who no fewer than seven times employs it in his first Epistle.

Yet a little while I am with you. Ye shall seek me - shall feel the want of Me.

And as I said unto the Jews (John 7:34; John 8:21). A remarkable word this here - "the Jews." The Eleven were all themselves Jews. But now that He and they were on a higher footing, He leaves the name to those who were Jews, and nothing but Jews.

Whither I go, ye cannot come; so now I say to you. But, O, in what a different sense!

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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on John 13:33". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/john-13.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(33) Little children, yet a little while I am with you.—The thought of His own glory brings with it the thought of their state of orphanage when He shall have departed from them, and He addresses them as “Little children,” with a word of tenderness spoken only here by Him. The word impressed itself upon the mind of St. John, and it occurs elsewhere in the New Testament only in his First Epistle (1 John 2:1; 1 John 2:12; 1 John 2:28; 1 John 3:7; 1 John 3:18; 1 John 4:4; 1 John 5:21), and in an uncertain reading in the striking words of St. Paul, “My little children, of whom I travail in birth again until Christ be formed in you.” (See Note on Galatians 4:19, and comp. Introduction, p. 371.)

For the remainder of the verse, see Notes on John 7:33-34; John 8:21.

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on John 13:33". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/john-13.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Little children, yet a little while I am with you. Ye shall seek me: and as I said unto the Jews, Whither I go, ye cannot come; so now I say to you.
Little
Galatians 4:19; 1 John 2:1; 4:4; 5:21
yet
12:35,36; 14:19; 16:16-22
Ye
7:33; 8:21-24; 14:4-6
Reciprocal: Psalm 34:11 - Come;  Matthew 26:11 - but;  Mark 2:20 - be taken;  Mark 10:24 - Children;  Mark 14:7 - but;  Luke 5:35 - when;  Luke 13:24 - for;  Luke 17:22 - when;  John 7:34 - GeneralJohn 12:8 - but;  John 13:36 - whither;  John 14:2 - I go;  John 16:19 - A little

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on John 13:33". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/john-13.html.

Ernst Hengstenberg on John, Revelation, Ecclesiastes, Ezekiel & Psalms

Ver. 33. "Little children, yet a little while I am with you. Ye shall seek Me: and as I said unto the Jews, Whither I go, ye cannot come; so now I say to you."

From the contemplation of His glory, Jesus again descends to His disciples. That which He here tells them, forms the foundation for the solemn exhortation of vers. 34, 35. He would, by allusion to the impending separation, render their minds tender and susceptible, that they might receive the exhortation, and shut it up in their heart. That which, when leaving them, He had so emphatically laid on their hearts as His last request, they would never dismiss from their thoughts." This exhortation brings the holy supper to its conclusion. It began with uncharitable contention; it ends in the exhortation to love.

It was appropriate that our Lord, when He would exhort His disciples to love, should use the most affectionate address, τεκνία, never elsewhere occurring in all the Evangelists ( τέκνα only once, Mark 10:24 : comp. Matthew 9:2; Mark 2:5 : comp. παιδία, ch. John 21:5), but which finds a kind of echo in the First Epistle of John. And it was all the more appropriate, as our Lord lays down as the foundation of His precept of love—as I have loved you.—"Ye shall seek Me:" especially in the times of trial and tribulation. This word, as parallel with what Jesus had spoken to the Jews (comp. John 7:33-34, John 8:21), points to the fact that even for the disciples, and for the faithful members of the Church, the ceasing of the bodily presence of Christ would be grievous and hard to be borne. Christ would be unapproachable to the Jews; and so He would be, in a certain sense, to His disciples, until they were received one by one into the heavenly glory, and He should return in visible form: comp. Acts 1:11. Assuredly, Jesus did not leave His disciples orphans; He came to them by the Paraclete; He is still and ever with them, present in the midst wherever two or three are gathered together in His name. But all this is not full compensation for His personal presence; does not hinder Christ from appearing as one who has gone away, ἀποδημῶν, Matthew 25:14; does not prevent His disciples from desiring, during the interval until His return, to see one of the days of the Son of man, Luke 17:22; and does not cause that, during this whole season, the fundamental tone of Christendom should not be sorrow. But it was profitable for them that it was so. Wrestling faith was thereby excited (comp. ch. John 20:29), and thus the best preparation secured for seeing Him in person.

Jesus says, "Yet a little while am I with you." This is to be referred to the short space until His imprisonment. The intercourse of the risen Lord with His disciples was essentially different from all His former intercourse, and led the way to that entirely spiritual communion which began after the Lord's ascension,

This is the only passage in which Jesus spoke to His disciples concerning the Jews. Elsewhere He uses the designation only in the conversation with the Samaritan woman, with Caiaphas, with Pilate. We have here the germ of the Johannaean phraseology: comp. on ch. John 1:19. Just here, after the institution of the sacrament of the new covenant, before the mention of the new commandment, and where there is a sharp distinction made between the disciples and the enemies of Jesus, the designation is quite in place. How carefully John distinguishes between his own words and the words of Jesus, may be gathered from the fact that the Jews are never mentioned save here, without the Evangelist himself coming forward in his own person to use the name.

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Hengstenberg, Ernst. "Commentary on John 13:33". Ernst Hengstenberg on John, Revelation, Ecclesiastes, Ezekiel & Psalms. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/heg/john-13.html.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

33.Little children, yet a little while am I with you. As it was impossible that the disciples should not be deeply grieved at their Master’s departure, so he gives them early warning that he will no longer be with them, and, at the same time, exhorts them to patience. Lastly, to remove unseasonable eagerness of desire, he declares that they cannot immediately follow him. In calling them little children, he shows, by that gentle appellation, that his reason for departing from them is not that he cares little about their welfare, for he loves them very tenderly. True, the object which he had in view in clothing himself with our flesh was, that he might be our brother, but by that other name he expresses more strongly the ardor of his love.

As I said to the Jews. When he says, that he repeats to them what he had formerly said to the Jews, this is true as to the words, but there is a wide difference in the meaning; for he declares that they cannot follow him, in order that they may endure patiently his temporary absence, and — so to speak — bridles them in, that; they may remain in their office, till they have finished their warfare on earth; so that he does not perpetually exclude them, as Jews, from the kingdom of God, but only bids them wait patiently, till he bring them, along with himself, into the heavenly kingdom.

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Calvin, John. "Commentary on John 13:33". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/john-13.html. 1840-57.