Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

John 14:11

Believe Me that I am in the Father and the Father is in Me; otherwise believe because of the works themselves.
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Commandments;   Doubting;   Faith;   God;   Jesus Continued;   Philip;   Scofield Reference Index - World-System;   Thompson Chain Reference - Future, the;   Heaven;   Heavenly;   Home;   Wonderful;   Works;   The Topic Concordance - Belief;   Giving and Gifts;   Holy Spirit;   Jesus Christ;   Love;   Obedience;   Prayer;   Understanding;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Conduct, Christian;   Unity of God;  
Dictionaries:
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - John, gospel of;   Miracles;   Philip;   Work;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Jesus Christ;   Union with Christ;   Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Holy Ghost;   Pre-Existence of Jesus Christ;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Jesus Christ;   Philip the Apostle;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Gospel;   Time, Meaning of;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Children (Sons) of God;   Faith;   God;   Holy Spirit;   John, Theology of;   Logos;   Miracles;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Authority of Christ;   Children of God;   Coming Again;   Communion (2);   Consciousness;   Creator (Christ as);   Faith ;   Force;   God;   Humanity of Christ;   Ignorance (2);   Immanence ;   Influence;   Justification;   Manuscripts;   Mediator;   Miracles (2);   Mission;   Peace (2);   Silence;   Son of God;   Trinity (2);   Witness (2);   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Works;   The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Fruit;   Pentecost;   Samuel;  
Encyclopedias:
Condensed Biblical Cyclopedia - Jesus of Nazareth;   International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Very;  
Devotionals:
Every Day Light - Devotion for October 6;  

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Believe me … - Believe my declarations that I am in the Father, etc. There were two grounds on which they might believe; one was his own testimony, the other was his works.

Or else - If credit is not given to my words, let there be to my miracles.

For the very works‘ sake - On account of the works; or, be convinced by the miracles themselves. Either his own testimony was sufficient to convince them, or the many miracles which he had performed in healing the sick, raising the dead, etc.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Bibliographical Information
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on John 14:11". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/john-14.html. 1870.

The Biblical Illustrator

John 14:11

Believe Me … for the very works’ sake

The miracles

I.
SHOULD WE BELIEVE THE MIRACLES?

1. Are miracles possible? Hume, Spinosa, and others say, “No: reason pronounces them impossible.” But whose reason? Theirs? Then that contradicts the all but universal reason, which affirms that with God all things are possible.

2. Are miracles improbable and incredible? Yes, say the same authorities. But did they live when they are alleged to have been performed? One ground of disbelief is, that it is impossible to believe what contradicts experience. But what remains to be proved is, Did miracles contradict the experience of the professed witnesses? The denizens of the equator never saw ice. Their experience contradicts that of the Greenlanders. But which shall we accept? Another ground is that it is unlikely that the Creator would disturb the beneficent order of events. Granted, except for the best and wisest purposes, and in such a way as not to derange the order of the universe. This is what is claimed for Christ; and, indeed, on behalf of the freedom and beneficence of the Creator. The anti-miraculous position is the dethronement of God in favour of natural law.

3. Have we satisfactory ground to believe that Christ performed miracles? There is the same evidence for them as that Caesar entered Gaul and

Britain. Upon this evidence the Christian Church is built; the witnesses died to support their testimony. The fabrication of this testimony would be more miraculous than what it records.

II. SHOULD WE BE INDUCED BY THEM TO ADMIT CHRIST’S DIVINE CLAIMS? Yes, for

1. They are the acts of a Creator. We recognize the same Voice saying, “Let there be light!” that said, “Lazarus, come forth!” We believe Him “for the works’ sake.”

2. Christ is the efficient Agent in all miracles. He promised, and gave to, the apostles their supernatural power; and they referred the effects of it back to Him, and exerted it to produce faith in Him.

3. Christ performed miracles by His own power and in His own name, which the apostles never did.

Conclusion:

1. The blessedness of belief in Christ.

2. The peril of disbelief. (E. N. Kirk, D. D.)

The reasonableness of the evidence of miracles, and its impotence alone

It is quite consistent with God’s wisdom to reveal Himself to the senses,as well as to the soul; and if the gospel were utterly deficient in this latter kind of proof, one great evidence that it is from God would be wanted--an evidence that we are fortified in expecting from the analogies of nature. God has written His glory--e.g., in the heart--at the same time, He has so constructed the visible universe, that “the heavens declare the glory of God.” And when the eternal Word is manifested into the world, we naturally expect that Divine power shall be shown, as well as Divine beneficence. Miracles, therefore, are exactly what we should expect; and I acknowledge a great corroboration and verification of His claims to Sonship. Besides, they startled and aroused many to His claims who otherwise would never have attended to them. Still the great truth remains untouched, that they, appealing only to the natural man, cannot convey the spiritual certainty of truth which the spiritual man alone apprehends. However, as the natural and spiritual in us are both from God, why should God not have spoken to both, and why should not Christ appeal to natural works, subordinate always to the spiritual self-evidence of Truth itself? (F. W. Robertson, M. A.)

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Exell, Joseph S. "Commentary on "John 14:11". The Biblical Illustrator. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tbi/john-14.html. 1905-1909. New York.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

Believe me that I am in the Father, and the Father in me: or else believe me for the very works' sake.

Exactly the same teaching had been given previously. See John 5:36 and John 10:37,38.

Copyright Statement
Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
Bibliographical Information
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on John 14:11". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/john-14.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Believe me that I am in the Father, and the Father in me,.... Take my word for the truth of this; you may assure yourselves that nothing is more certain; but if you will not believe upon my saying so, either believe for the sake of the doctrines I have preached unto you, which are such as never any mere man spoke, and which have been delivered in such a manner, and with such authority, as never were by man. Some copies read, by way of interrogation, and so the Ethiopic version; and the Vulgate Latin version reads, "believe ye not?"

or else believe me for the very work's sake: meaning his miraculous works, such as raising the dead, cleansing the lepers, causing the deaf to hear, and giving sight to the blind; and which were such as none but a divine person could ever perform.

Copyright Statement
The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on John 14:11". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/john-14.html. 1999.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

Believe me (πιστευετε μοιpisteuete moi). Repeated appeal (present active imperative of πιστευωpisteuō) as in John 14:1 to his disciples and as he had done with the hostile Jews to be influenced by his “works” at any rate (John 10:38).

Copyright Statement
The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)
Bibliographical Information
Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on John 14:11". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/john-14.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Vincent's Word Studies

Believe me ( πιστεύετέ μοι )

The plural of the imperative: “believe ye me.” Compare believest thou, John 14:10. These words are addressed to the disciples collectively, whose thought Philip had voiced.

Or else ( εἰ δὲ μὴ )

Literally, but if not. If you do not believe on the authority of my personal statement.

For the very works' sake ( διὰ τὰ ἔργα αὐτὰ )

Literally, on account of the works themselves, irrespective of my oral testimony.

Copyright Statement
The text of this work is public domain.
Bibliographical Information
Vincent, Marvin R. DD. "Commentary on John 14:11". "Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/vnt/john-14.html. Charles Schribner's Sons. New York, USA. 1887.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

Believe me that I am in the Father, and the Father in me: or else believe me for the very works' sake.

Believe me — On my own word, because I am God.

The works — This respects not merely the miracles themselves, but his sovereign, Godlike way of performing them.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
Bibliographical Information
Wesley, John. "Commentary on John 14:11". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/john-14.html. 1765.

The Fourfold Gospel

Believe me that I am in the Father, and the Father in me1: or else believe me for the very works' sake2.

  1. Believe me that I am in the Father, and the Father in me. To ask Jesus to reveal the indwelling Father was much the same as to ask a man to reveal his own soul. Therefore Jesus asks Philip to take his word for the great fact, or, if that were not deemed sufficient,

  2. Or else believe me for the very works' sake. To believe it because of the works which Jesus wrought. Divine works testify to the presence of a divine spirit and power.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website. These files were made available by Mr. Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.
Bibliographical Information
J. W. McGarvey and Philip Y. Pendleton. "Commentary on John 14:11". "The Fourfold Gospel". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tfg/john-14.html. Standard Publishing Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 1914.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

Верьте Мне. Христос сначала требует от учеников, чтобы они верили Его свидетельству, о том, что Он – Сын Божий. Поскольку же до сих пор они были весьма нерадивы, Он косвенно попрекает их леность. Если Мои слова не вызывают у вас веры, если вы так мало их цените, и не хотите им верить, по крайней мере, признайте Мою силу, зримый образ присутствия во Мне Бога. Весьма абсурдно – не полагаться на слова Христовы. Ведь надлежит принимать без колебаний, что бы Он ни сказал. Но здесь Христос попрекает учеников в другом. Он столько раз учил их одному и тому же, а они так мало в этом преуспели. Он не учит их, какова природа веры, но говорит: у них есть то, что достаточно для убеждения даже неверующих. Повторение слов: «Я в Отце, и Отец во Мне», далеко не излишне. Мы на собственном опыте знаем, как часто наша природа подталкивает нас к пустому любопытству. Вне Христа у нас будут лишь вымышленные нами же идолы. А во Христе есть только одно божественное, удерживающее нас в Боге.

 

 

 

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Bibliographical Information
Calvin, John. "Commentary on John 14:11". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/john-14.html. 1840-57.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

11 Believe me that I am in the Father, and the Father in me: or else believe me for the very works’ sake.

Ver. 11. Believe me that I am, &c.] Take my bare word without any further pawn or proof. This is an honour due to Christ only, that he is αυτοπιστος, He is Amen, "the faithful and true witness," Revelation 3:14.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Trapp, John. "Commentary on John 14:11". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/john-14.html. 1865-1868.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

John 14:11. πιστεύετέ μοι) Non creditis is the reading of the Lat. Vulg. arising from alliteration [the transcriber’s eye catching the similar letters and word] at the preceding verse, which also had, Non credis quia. Thence the Latin transcriber also has omitted mihi(347) also at the end of the verse. Believe, Believe: an instance of Epanalepsis [See Append., “When the same word is in the beginning of the preceding member, and in the end of the following member of the sentence”].— ὅτι) because [but Engl. Vers. that]: with which comp. the διά, for the sake of presently after. Believe Me for the sake of, My very affirmation, which is sufficient ground for believers to rest on. This is the first motive to faith; one which Christ alone could have proposed: a second is afforded by the miracles, on account of which the apostles also could have been believed [could claim their hearers’ faith] concerning Christ.— ἔργα, the works) which ye have heretofore seen, and which ye are about to see: John 14:12, etc., “Greater works than these shall he do.” [For these could not have been of any other, save Divine origination. Psalms 72:18, “The Lord God—who only doeth wondrous things;” Psalms 136:4, “To Him, who alone doeth great wonders.” The footing on which false miracles rest is altogether distinct: 2 Thessalonians 2:9, “The working of Satan, with all power, and signs, and lying wonders.”—V. g.]— πιστεύετέ μοι, believe Me) εἰς ἐμέ, on Me, in the foll. verse. He who believes Christ, when speaking concerning Himself, believes on Christ: whereas, he who believes Peter, when speaking concerning Christ, believes not on Peter, but on Christ.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on John 14:11". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/john-14.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Believe my words (for that is your duty); but yet if you will not believe my words, declaring to you my union with my Father, yet when you see me doing such works as none but God can do, believe me for their sake. It is true, that both the prophets and the apostles spake God’s words, not their own, to the people, and also did many great and mighty works; but still their doctrine led unto another, that was Christ; and their miracles were not wrought in their own names, but in the name of Christ. Elijah raised the Shunammite’s dead child to life by prayer to God that he would do it; and the apostles bid the lame man arise and walk, in the name of the Lord Jesus Christ. Christ’s doctrine terminated in himself; he called men to believe in him, and he wrought miracles by his own power, and by a virtue proceeding out of and from himself, though by the power of his Father also, because he and his Father were one in essence.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on John 14:11". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/john-14.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

11.Believe me’ or’ for the very works’ sake—That is, believe me from my own self-evident nature as you see me before you; or believe me for the sake of the very miracles I perform. The living character of Jesus was its own evidence, speaking for itself, and worthy to inspire faith of the highest kind in the higher order of mind. Even at the present day the person and character of Jesus, as mirrored in the Gospels, is a unique and powerful proof of its own divinity. But if Philip’s mind could not appreciate this proof, let him look at the divine works of Jesus, and acknowledge that he who possesses so supernatural a power in his deeds must possess a supernatural power in his words.

 

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on John 14:11". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/john-14.html. 1874-1909.

Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible

“Believe me that I am in the Father, and the Father in me, or else believe me for the very works’ sake.”

Jesus now repeats what He has said in John 10:38. He longs that they may look at Him and consider His life and recognise His uniqueness as the One Who is the abode of the Father, recognise that He fully and actually represents the Father distinctively and completely, and that because They are in such unity that when One acts the Other is acting. But if the disciples are not quite there yet, let them rather contemplate His works and let His works speak for Him. For while that is not finally sufficient, it is a beginning. What is important is that they should step over the line from saying, ‘Master’, to saying ‘My Lord and My God’ (John 20:28).

It is quite evident that by ‘the Father in me and I in the Father’ He was here intending to indicate His own unique Oneness with the Father (compare John 10:30; John 10:38), for the whole context demands it. No one else could have said these words with this significance, nor can. It is true that later He can say that the Father is in His disciples (John 14:23), and that we can claim to be ‘in Him’, but it is obvious from the context that what He says here is in a different sense from that. He never suggests that when people see the disciples they actually see the Father. His disciples may become the dwelling place of the Father through the activity of Jesus and His Spirit, (and thus spiritually), and as a result reveal something of the Father, but in the case of Jesus the oneness is such a permanent and essential reality that to see Him is to see the fullness of God, something revealed by His works which only God could do.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Pett, Peter. "Commentary on John 14:11". "Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible ". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pet/john-14.html. 2013.

Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable

Jesus cited another proof of His union with the Father beside His words, namely, His works (Gr. erga). Specifically He meant His miracles (cf. John 5:36; John 10:25; John 10:37-38; John 11:47; John 12:37; John 20:30-31). Jesus" miracles were signs that signified His divine identity (cf. John 2:11). What we regard as a miracle was nothing more than a normal work for Jesus. [Note: For a discussion of Jesus" "works," see Morris, pp607-13.]

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Constable, Thomas. DD. "Commentary on John 14:11". "Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dcc/john-14.html. 2012.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

John 14:11. Believe me that I am in the Father, and the Father in me: or else believe for his works’ sake. Jesus has established the proposition by which He would show Philip the impropriety of his request. He now calls upon him, and upon the other disciples through him, to receive it. First, they ought to do this upon the authority of His own statement, the statement of One who is in the Father; but, if that be not enough, then upon the authority of the Father’s works in Him. By these last we are certainly not to understand miracles alone. Miracles are, no doubt, included, although not simply as works of supernatural power. All the works of the Father in the Son are meant, all bearing on them those tokens of the Father which appeal to the heart, and ought to satisfy men that, in doing them, Jesus reveals not Himself but the Father. The second part of the reply follows in

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on John 14:11". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/john-14.html. 1879-90.

The Expositor's Greek Testament

John 14:11. . “Believe me,” i.e., my assertion, not my manifestation, “or if you find that difficult, believe on account of the works themselves”. The mention of His works and the evidence they afford that He is in the Father suggests to Him a ground of comfort for His disciples in view of His departure. And from this point onwards in this chapter it is to the comforting of the disciples our Lord addresses Himself. First, in John 14:12-14; second, in John 14:15-17; third, in John 14:18-21. The mention of the Paraclete in connection with this third item of encouragement gives rise to a fourth interruption, this time by Judas, John 14:22-24; and at John 14:25. Jesus resumes His explanation of the Paraclete’s function, and closes with several considerations calculated to remove their fears.

 

 

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Nicol, W. Robertson, M.A., L.L.D. "Commentary on John 14:11". The Expositor's Greek Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/john-14.html. 1897-1910.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

Believe Me that, &c. App-150.

believe Me. App-150.

for . . . sake = On account of. Greek. dia. App-104. John 14:2.

very works = works themselves.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on John 14:11". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/john-14.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

Believe me that I am in the Father, and the Father in me: or else believe me for the very works' sake.

Believe me that I am in the Father, and the Father in me: or else believe me for the very works' sake: -

q.d., 'By all your faith in Me, Believe this on My simple word: but if so high a claim is more than your feeble faith can yet reach, let the works I have done tell their own tale, and it will need no more.' Can anything more clearly show that Christ claimed for His miracles a higher character than those of prophets or apostles? And yet this higher character lay not in the works themselves, but in His manner of doing them. (See the notes at Mark 6:30-56, Remark 1 at the close of that section, page 163.)

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on John 14:11". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/john-14.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(11) Believe me that I am in the Father.—He passes now from Philip, and addresses Himself to the whole body of the apostles. He claims from them a personal trust in Himself, which should accept His statement that He and the Father were immanent in each other.

Or else believe me for the very works’ sake.—If they cannot receive the truth on the testimony of His word, He will take lower ground with them. He will place before them the evidence He had placed before the Jews. Let them, if they will not hear Him, believe on account of the very works which He had done. (Comp. Note on John 5:19-20; John 10:37-38.)

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on John 14:11". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/john-14.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Believe me that I am in the Father, and the Father in me: or else believe me for the very works' sake.
or
5:36; 10:25,32,38; 12:38-40; Matthew 11:4,5; Luke 7:21-23; Acts 2:22; Hebrews 2:4
Reciprocal: Numbers 16:28 - Hereby;  John 8:29 - he that sent;  John 9:3 - but;  John 9:16 - This man;  John 11:15 - to;  John 16:32 - yet;  2 Corinthians 5:19 - God;  2 Peter 1:17 - God

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on John 14:11". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/john-14.html.

Ernst Hengstenberg on John, Revelation, Ecclesiastes, Ezekiel & Psalms

Ver. 11. "Believe Me that I am in the Father, and the Father in Me: or else believe Me for the very works' sake."

Heumann: "O how would the disciples be humbled by this address, in which our Lord spoke in such a manner as if He doubted as to their faith in Himself!" With this we must compare ch. John 10:38. His disciples ought first of all to believe Christ's utterance as to His relation to the Father, as it was delivered by the impression of His whole personality. But if they were in circumstances which would not allow of this, they should at least believe on account of the works. In connection with these might, as in ver. 10, the words have been named, the whole sum of His spirit-breathing, life-breathing discourses, in contradistinction to the mere utterance concerning His being one with the Father. But the Lord falls back upon the works alone, because these furnished the most palpable evidence. The works themselves: this points to the fact that these alone were sufficient for demonstration. Luther: "This is the style in which St John and St Paul, before others, teach in this matter, firmly uniting together Christ and the Father, in order that we may learn not to think anything about God apart from Christ, and to hide and wrap ourselves in His Christ.

Here is a beautiful word and sermon for the Apostle Philip, in which not only is he answered, but the fluctuating thoughts of all men; for the whole world and thyself are here told by the Lord: Wherefore wilt thou seek God otherwise than in Me, or desire to see and hear any other word and work than that which I speak and do?"

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Hengstenberg, Ernst. "Commentary on John 14:11". Ernst Hengstenberg on John, Revelation, Ecclesiastes, Ezekiel & Psalms. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/heg/john-14.html.