Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

John 14:19

After a little while the world will no longer see Me, but you will see Me; because I live, you will live also.
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - God;   Immortality;   Jesus, the Christ;   Jesus Continued;   Resurrection;   Righteous;   Scofield Reference Index - World-System;   Thompson Chain Reference - Blindness-Vision;   Future, the;   Heaven;   Heavenly;   Holy Spirit;   Home;   Spirit;   Vision;   The Topic Concordance - Holy Spirit;   Jesus Christ;   Life;   Truth;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Firstfruits;   Life;   Resurrection of the Dead;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Comfort;   Counselor;   Faith;   Feasts and Festivals of Israel;   Follow, Follower;   Sanctification;   Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Holy Ghost;   Easton Bible Dictionary - Faith;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Atonement, Day of;   Resurrection;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Ascension;   Children (Sons) of God;   Ethics;   God;   Holy Spirit;   John, Theology of;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Brotherhood (2);   Comfort (2);   Coming Again;   Communion (2);   Creator (Christ as);   Death of Christ;   Foresight;   John, Gospel of (Ii. Contents);   Kenosis;   Man (2);   Manuscripts;   Regeneration;   Substance ;   Touch;   Unity (2);   The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Church;   Fruit;   Holy ghost;   Nail;   Pentecost;   Saints;   Samuel;   Sanctification;   Wilson's Dictionary of Bible Types - Branch;  
Encyclopedias:
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Eschatology of the New Testament;   Eternal;   Immortal;   Johannine Theology, the;   Trinity;  
Devotionals:
Daily Light on the Daily Path - Devotion for June 28;   Every Day Light - Devotion for March 9;   Faith's Checkbook - Devotion for October 16;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

Because I live - As surely as I shall rise from the dead, so shall ye. My resurrection shall be the proof and pledge of yours. And because I live a life of intercession for you at the right hand of God, ye shall live a life of grace and peace here, and a life of glory hereafter.

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Bibliographical Information
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on John 14:19". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/john-14.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

A little while - This was the day before his death.

Seeth me no more - No more until the day of judgment. The men of the world would not see him visibly, and they had not the eye of faith to discern him.

But ye see me - Ye shall continue to see me by faith, even when the world cannot. You will continue to see me by the eye of faith as still your gracious Saviour and Friend.

Because I live - Though the Saviour was about to die, yet was he also about to be raised from the dead. He was to continue to live, and though absent from them, yet he would feel the same interest in their welfare as when he was with them on earth. This expression does not refer “particularly” to his “resurrection,” but his “continuing to live.” He had a nature which could not die. As Mediator also he would be raised and continue to live: and he would have both power and inclination to give them also life, to defend them, and bring them with him.

Ye shall live also - This doubtless refers to their future life. And we learn from this:

1.That the life of the Christian depends on that of Christ. They are united; and if they were separated, the Christian could neither enjoy spiritual life here nor eternal joy hereafter.

2.The fact that Jesus lives is a pledge that all who believe in him shall he saved. He has power over all our spiritual foes, and he can deliver us from the hands of our enemies, and from all temptations and trials.

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Bibliographical Information
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on John 14:19". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/john-14.html. 1870.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

Yet a little while, and the world beholdeth me no more; but ye behold me: because I live, ye shall live also.

Because I live ... is a prophetic reference to the resurrection, because Jesus was clearly speaking of a time when the world should no longer see him. This is a second "because," like that in John 14:12, and shows the necessity of Jesus' return to the Father. The divine plan of establishing a worldwide spiritual kingdom could only have been hindered by the continued physical presence of Jesus on earth. Advocates of a literal return of Christ to a literal throne should take this into account.

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Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
Bibliographical Information
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on John 14:19". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/john-14.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Yet a little while, and the world seeth me no more,.... The men of the world now see me with their bodily eyes, which is all the sight they have of me; and this they will be deprived of in a very little time; they will see me no more until the time that I shall come in the clouds of heaven to judge the world; and then every eye shall see me:

but ye see me; ye see me now, and shall see me after my resurrection, as they did; for then he appeared alive and conversed with them for forty days; and when he ascended into heaven, and sat down at the right hand of God, they saw him by faith crowned with glory and honour; and will see him as he is when he comes a second time to take them to himself in glory.

Because I live, ye shall believe also: Christ lives as God, as man, and as Mediator: as God, he lives the same life his Father does, partaking of the same nature, and possessing the same perfections; so he lived from everlasting, and will live to everlasting; as man, he lived first a private, and then a public life, attended with meanness, reproaches, sorrows, and sufferings; a life which was filled up with acts of devotion and piety to God, and with doing good to the bodies and souls of men; he lived in all obedience to the law of God, and at last endured the penalty of that law, in the room and stead of his people; when his life was taken away for a while, and then taken up by him again; and now, as man, he lives, and lives for evermore. As Mediator, he has his life from the Father, which is dependent upon him, by whom he was set up in an office capacity from everlasting; and as such will live to everlasting, to see the travail of his soul, the fruit of his sufferings, to make intercession for his people, and to rule until all enemies are made his footstool. And his people "live also", which is to be understood, not of the preservation of his disciples from dying with him, when he died; for then it should rather have been said, "because I die, ye shall live": nor of the continuance of their natural life in this world; for the saints are not to live always here; nor do they desire it, nor is it proper they should; death is for their advantage; it is a blessing to them. Though these words may be understood of a corporeal life, which they shall live after the resurrection; for though they die, they shall live again, and never die more; they shall not only live and reign with Christ a thousand years, but to all eternity. They also live a spiritual life now; a life of grace and holiness from Christ; a life of faith on him, and sometimes of communion with him, and desire to live to his honour and glory; and shall hereafter live an eternal life of perfection and pleasure, with Father, Son, and Spirit, for evermore. Now between these two lives, the life of Christ, and his people, there is a close connection; the one is dependent on the other, and secured by the other: "because I live, ye shall live also"; the spiritual life of a believer is from Christ, and is maintained by him; the same which is in the head, is in the members; yea, it is not so much they that live, as Christ that lives in them, and therefore their life can never be lost; it is bound up in the bundle of life with Christ, and is hid safe and secure with him in God, and so out of the reach both of men and devils. The corporeal life of the saints after death, in the resurrection morn, springs from, and is secured by the life of Christ: his resurrection from the dead is the pattern and pledge of theirs; he undertook to raise them from the dead, and will do it; as sure as his dead body is raised and lives, so sure shall theirs; their bodies, as well as their souls, are united to Christ; and by virtue of this union, which death does not, and cannot dissolve, they shall be raised and live again. They are in Christ whilst they are dead; and because they are "the dead in Christ", they shall "rise first". Their eternal life is in the hands of Christ, and when he, who is the true God, and their eternal life, shall appear, they shall appear with him in glory.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on John 14:19". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/john-14.html. 1999.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

world seeth — beholdeth.

me no more, but ye see — behold.

me — His bodily presence, being all the sight of Him which “the world” ever had, or was capable of, it “beheld Him no more” after His departure to the Father; but by the coming of the Spirit, the presence of Christ was not only continued to His spiritually enlightened disciples, but rendered far more efficacious and blissful than His bodily presence had been before the Spirit‘s coming.

because I live — not “shall live,” only when raised from the dead; for it is His unextinguishable, divine life of which He speaks, in view of which His death and resurrection were but as shadows passing over the sun‘s glorious disk. (Compare Luke 24:5; Revelation 1:18, “the Living One”). And this grand saying Jesus uttered with death immediately in view. What a brightness does this throw over the next clause, “ye shall live also!” “Knowest thou not,” said Luther to the King of Terrors, “that thou didst devour the Lord Christ, but wert obliged to give Him back, and wert devoured of Him? So thou must leave me undevoured because I abide in Him, and live and suffer for His name‘s sake. Men may hunt me out of the world - that I care not for - but I shall not on that account abide in death. I shall live with my Lord Christ, since I know and believe that He liveth!” (quoted in Stier).

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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on John 14:19". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/john-14.html. 1871-8.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

But ye behold me (υμεις δε τεωρειτε μεhumeis de theōreite me). Emphatic position of υμειςhumeis (ye) in contrast to the blind, unseeing world. Cf. John 13:33; John 16:10, John 16:16.

Because I live, ye shall live also (οτι εγω ζω και υμεις ζησετεhoti egō zō kai humeis zēsete). This is our blessed guarantee of immortal, eternal life, the continued living of Jesus. He is the surety of a better covenant (Hebrews 7:22), the Risen Christ Jesus. He had said it before (John 6:57).

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The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)
Bibliographical Information
Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on John 14:19". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/john-14.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Vincent's Word Studies

Ye shall live also ( καὶ ὑμεῖς ζήσεσθε )

This may also be rendered, and ye shall live, explaining the former statement, ye behold me. So Rev., in margin. This is better. John is not arguing for the dependence of their life on Christ's, but for fellowship with Christ as the ground of spiritual vision.

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Vincent, Marvin R. DD. "Commentary on John 14:19". "Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/vnt/john-14.html. Charles Schribner's Sons. New York, USA. 1887.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

Yet a little while, and the world seeth me no more; but ye see me: because I live, ye shall live also.

But ye see me — That is, ye shall certainly see me.

Because I live, ye shall live also — Because I am the living One in my Divine nature, and shall rise again in my human nature, and live for ever in heaven: therefore ye shall live the life of faith and love on earth, and hereafter the life of glory.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
Bibliographical Information
Wesley, John. "Commentary on John 14:19". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/john-14.html. 1765.

The Fourfold Gospel

Yet a little while, and the world beholdeth me no more1; but ye behold me2: because I live, ye shall live also.

  1. Yet a little while, and the world beholdeth me no more. The next day the world crucified him and sealed him in the tomb, and since then has seen him no more.

  2. But ye behold me. The present tense here indicates a continued vision; it cannot therefore refer to the appearances of Christ after the resurrection, for the terminated at the end of forty days.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website. These files were made available by Mr. Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.
Bibliographical Information
J. W. McGarvey and Philip Y. Pendleton. "Commentary on John 14:19". "The Fourfold Gospel". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tfg/john-14.html. Standard Publishing Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 1914.

Abbott's Illustrated New Testament

Ye see me; ye shall see me.--Shall live; shall be preserved and protected.

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Abbott, John S. C. & Abbott, Jacob. "Commentary on John 14:19". "Abbott's Illustrated New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ain/john-14.html. 1878.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

Еще немного. Христос продолжает хвалить особую благодать, достаточную для облегчения и даже полного устранения скорби учеников. Когда Я, – говорит Христос, – удалюсь с глаз мира сего, Я, тем не менее, останусь среди вас. Кроме того, чтобы наслаждаться этим тайным лицезрением Христа, не надо смотреть на Его телесное присутствие или отсутствие. Нам надлежит лишь созерцать Его силу очами веры. Посему верующие всегда видят Христа присутствующим Своим Духом, хотя телом и далеко от Него отстоят.

Ибо Я живу. Смысл может быть двояким. Или это предложение есть подтверждение предыдущего, или его надо читать отдельно: верующие потому победят мир, что Христос продолжает жить. Я охотнее приму первый смысл, из которого, однако, выводится и второй: жизнь Христова есть причина нашей жизни. Вначале Христос говорит об основании такого различия. Почему Свои будут Его видеть, а мир – нет? Потому что Христа можно видеть только через духовную жизнь, которой мир лишен. Мир не видит Христа, и в этом нет ничего удивительного. Ибо смерть одновременно есть причина слепоты. Однако как только кто-то начинает жить Духом, он тут же получает глаза, которыми можно видеть Христа. Это происходит потому, что с жизнью Христовой соединена и наша жизнь, проистекая из нее будто из своего источника. Ведь сами по себе мы мертвые, и жизнь, которой мы хвалимся, – наихудшая смерть. Итак, когда идет речь об обретении жизни, следует обратить взор ко Христу, и Его жизнь должна передаться нам, дабы совесть наша твердо уверилась: доколе живет Христос, мы также не подвержены гибели. Ибо незыблемым остается положение: Христос не может жить, когда мертвы Его члены.

 

 

 

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Calvin, John. "Commentary on John 14:19". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/john-14.html. 1840-57.

Scofield's Reference Notes

world

kosmos = world-system. John 15:18; John 15:19; John 7:7. (See Scofield "Revelation 13:8").

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These files are considered public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available in the Online Bible Software Library.
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Scofield, C. I. "Scofield Reference Notes on John 14:19". "Scofield Reference Notes (1917 Edition)". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/srn/john-14.html. 1917.

James Nisbet's Church Pulpit Commentary

LIFE THROUGH CHRIST

‘Because I live, ye shall live also.’

John 14:19

There is only one law of life, and that law uniform, whatever the manifestation. Let us note three of the essentials of life.

I. Life has never been seen.—Living matter we have; but the minutest examination failed to give a glimpse of life itself. We detect life by its operations. ‘Because I live, ye shall live also’ meant a new localisation for new ends, an extension of powers through the existing power of a life triumphant over death.

II. Life is the cause, never the effect of organisation.—By baptism the living soul is lifted into higher life, made part of an organism. Matter is lifeless until taken up into union with quickened forms. We who conform to the law of the higher life are in Christ by a unifying process. In the organic life of His Body we find fullness of expression.

III. Life must be reproductive.—Non-productive life is practically non-existent. The question of the risen Christ is not ‘Are you saved?’ but ‘Are you saving?’ The man who is not saving others has not yet entered into the fullness of Christ’s life.

Illustration

‘O soul of man, called to this wonderful existence, so gifted, yet so rigidly bounded; made for such great things, yet turned aside by such poor ones; so promising, yet so transient; the breath of a day between the two eternities, yet rich with power, and thought, and beauty, rich in capacities of grace and goodness, ever unfolding, ever growing; conscious of such needs and such evils, longing for such firm reality and truth, responding to such calls, and then going hence as if never having been—where is to be thy part? What wilt thou do with what is given thee, with that great and fearful thing which we call life? Wilt thou rest in the portion of the first Adam, great, lovely as it often is, merely to live, to see, to be glad in the sky above and God’s blessing on the earth, in our home, in our work? It is enough if we had no more. It is enough to be thankful for if our view closed here. But the first man is of the earth earthy, and there is the Second Man, the Lord from Heaven.… He only

“Holds for us the keys of either home,

Earth and the world to come.”

O soul of man, inheritor of the first Adam, new born to the Second, which wilt thou choose?’

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Bibliographical Information
Nisbet, James. "Commentary on John 14:19". Church Pulpit Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cpc/john-14.html. 1876.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

19 Yet a little while, and the world seeth me no more; but ye see me: because I live, ye shall live also.

Ver. 19. But ye see me] The spiritual man hath "the mind of Christ," 1 Corinthians 2:16, and those things revealed unto him that natural eye never saw, carnal ear never heard, neither hath it entered into the heart of man the things which God hath prepared for them that love him; neither prepared only, but imparted to his beforehand, even in this life. For he reserves not all for the life to come, but gives a grape of Canaan in this wilderness, such as the world never tasted of.

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Bibliographical Information
Trapp, John. "Commentary on John 14:19". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/john-14.html. 1865-1868.

Sermon Bible Commentary

John 14:19

I. Christ lives. In Him was life. He was the Prince, the Author of life. He submitted to die for the sin of the world. But it was impossible that He should be holden of death. He has resumed the body of His humanity, but it is now a glorified body, a body freed from the laws to which He before submitted it, of space and motion; no longer the body of our vileness, but the body of His glory.

II. He liveth; and now what does our text announce to us from His own lips as the consequences of that His life? "Because I live, ye shall live also." Immense consequences shall result from this resumption of His Body, and reunion of it in its resurrection form to His Godhead and His glorified humanity. (1) "In Christ shall all be made alive," In this lowest, but evident sense, because He lives, we shall live also. Every body of man shall one day be re-animated; known as his body was known, by its distinguishing marks and features; built up again by Him who built it up at first, and reunited to the human soul, which has been waiting in the abode of the departed the fulness of the Father's time. (2) All are united to Christ in the flesh. His body was our body; and the unbeliever, as well as the believer, is one flesh with Christ. All have the same animal and intellectual soul which Christ took upon Him; all, unbeliever as well as believer, are sharers in the immortality which He conferred on our nature by His resurrection, as far as this is concerned in it. All have the same immortal spirit; but here comes in the difference. The man who has degraded that Spirit by which he should have reached out after God, who has never sprinkled it with Christ's atoning blood, nor had God's Spirit dwelling in it, he shall live for ever in one sense—but how live for ever? In no spiritual life or enjoyment of God, in no apprehension of Him; for he has rejected the Son of God; and thus for him is reserved a final state of banishment from the presence of God and disappointment of all the high ends of his being. But in the opposite case of the spiritually minded, of those who have learned to look above the world and its animal enjoyment, and its intellectual power and pride, and to seek after the Father of their Spirits by believing on the Son of His love,—they are united to Christ not only in the flesh, not only in the animal and intellectual soul, but in the Spirit also. When Christ, who is their life shall appear, then shall they also appear with Him in glory.

H. Alford, Quebec Chapel Sermons, vol. i., p. 251.


Life in Christ

I. What we all want, and most of us feel that we want, is to live lovingly. Most persons have a consciousness that they are not living up to the intention of their being, and this sense of the interval which there is between the life we live and the life we might live, is perhaps the chief cause of that general undefined feeling of dissatisfaction and uncomfortableness by which so many of us are continually oppressed. So long as there is an interval between what a man might live, and what he ought to live, and what he does live, there will never be any real rest, and the greater the distance, the greater the restlessness. Seeing that we are constituted as we are, no man can have the true enjoyment of the sense of life until there is something of eternity in his living. It is an element which God has made to be a part of our spiritualised nature. And there will always be a void until it is in the mind, and we can say of anything we feel, think, or do, "This is for eternity."

II. Now, it is of this life of a man, in his body, soul, and spirit—it is of this life in a man, as forming a part of his immortality, that Christ is speaking, when He makes this comfortable promise concerning His resurrection and ascension, "Because I live, ye shall live also." See how the life of every Christian, i.e., of everyone who really lives, owes itself to the life of Jesus Christ. We live because the death of Christ upon the Cross redeemed us from a state of death; the dying of Jesus being in substitution for our dying, released us from the necessity of dying for ever. And having thus made us capable of living, the death of Christ placed us under those processes by which a certain new inward life is formed and perfected in us.

III. As water is ever seeking the level from which it flows, so the Christian life is always rising towards the standard of that life of Christ in which its own hidden fountain lies. It is a self-evident truth that if we live by Christ and on Christ, we must also live in Christ and to Christ. Our being, true to its great prototype, of which indeed it is only a part, is passing, for a short appointed period, through a risen spiritual life, preparatory to its glorified condition, of which it is always standing upon the eve, when, like Jesus, it will ascend and be taken up to its perfected consummation, and rise to life indeed for ever and ever.

J. Vaughan, Fifty Sermons, 5th series, p. 44.


The Natural Immortality of the Human Soul

I. Note some considerations which go to establish the radical unlikeness between spiritual and material beings. (1) The spirit of man knows itself to be capable of continuous improvement and development. (2) The spirit or mind of man is conscious of, and it values, its own existence. (3) Unless a spiritual being is immortal such a being does count for less in the universe than mere inert matter, for matter has a kind of immortality of its own.

II. How does Christ communicate life when He is out of reach of the senses? (1) By His spirit; (2) by the Christian sacraments.

H. P. Liddon, Penny Pulpit, No. 945.

Consider some aspects in which our Lord's words light up for us our life. I propose to show how the risen Saviour dispels the darkness in which we walk, fills the vacancy which we dread, gives us the victory over death.

I. The resurrection of Christ is emphatically the accomplishment of our redemption. Apart from that there is no hope for us as sinners in the sight of God. If Jesus Christ had only died, the perfect man would have appeared, but the perfect man would have gone down into the abyss of darkness like the rest. There would have been no proof that the Sacrifice was pleasing to God, no evidence that the Father had accepted Him. But now is Christ risen from the dead, and therein is our salvation sure.

II. But, again, the resurrection of Christ is our victory over death. The life which He has purchased He has given to us, and that life scorns death. He is so One with us that His victory is ours. And so He Himself declares that if we believe in Him we shall never die. Not only death cannot terrify Christ's children, death has no power over them; death is not death, it is a sleep, or rather it is a birth—a birth into a new and glorious life. It is a deliverance, it is a joy. Do not call it death; there is no real death but separation from God; that is death, death of body and death of soul, death temporal and death eternal. The believer who is one with Christ can say, "O death, where is thy sting?"

III. But the text is true in another sense. The resurrection is the pledge of the resurrection of our bodies. Because He lives, we also shall live, not only as disembodied spirits, but with new bodies, clothed upon with our house which is from heaven.

IV. The resurrection of Christ implies that we are now, even in this world, risen with Him. St. Paul's great object, he tells us, was to know Christ and the power of His resurrection. It was his aim and endeavour, it was his constant prayer, to be conformed to the image of his risen Saviour. It was to this that he exhorted his converts, "Our conversation is in heaven." "If ye then be risen with Christ, seek those things which are above, where Christ sitteth on the right hand of God."

J. J. S. Perowne, Sermons, p. 274.


References: John 14:19.—Spurgeon, Sermons, vol. xvii., No. 968; Preacher's Monthly, vol. x., p. 18; J. Vaughan, Three Hundred Outlines on the New Testament, p. 91; T. T. Munger, The Freedom Faith, p. 257.

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Nicoll, William R. "Commentary on John 14:19". "Sermon Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/sbc/john-14.html.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

John 14:19. Yet a little while, A little while indeed, for he was crucified the next day: and he more particularly declares, that he would not appear to the Jewish nation in general after his resurrection, but only to his disciples. He adds, "Because I live, by rising from the dead, ye shall live also,—by rising from the dead; and also now by means of those divine influences which you shall derive from me, to cherish the workings of grace in your hearts, and to train you up to a growing meetness for sharing with me in eternal life." Comp. 2 Corinthians 4:10-11.

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Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on John 14:19". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/john-14.html. 1801-1803.

Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament

Here our Saviour foretells his approaching death, that within a little time the men of the world should see him no more; for though he rose again, the world saw him no more after his death; for we read of no appearance of him after his resurrection to any, but to his disciples only. Indeed his resurrection to any, but to his disciples only. Indeed the hour is coming when the world shall see him again: namely, at the day of judgment, when every eye shall behold him with terror and amazement.

Observe farther, The consolation given to his disciples, Ye shall see me; and because I live, ye shall live also. Because I am raised from the grave, I will quicken your dead bodies in the grave, and ye shall live also: and as I live by my ascension into heaven, so shall you my disciples live a life of grace here, and a life of glory with myself hereafter.

Learn hence, That a believer's spiritual life is derived from Christ, who, by his spirit, communicates a quickening virtue to all his members; Because he lives, they shall live also. See how Christ binds up their life together with his own! As if he had said, "Whilst there is vital sap in the root, you that are branches in me shall not wither and die."

Observe lastly, A farther privilege insured to believers after Christ's ascension, and the spirit's mission; they should more perfectly understand the essential union betwixt Christ and his members!

At that day ye shall know that I am in my Father, &c. The knowledge which the saints now have of the mysterious and mystical union, is but dark and imperfect; but in heaven they shall understand these things clearly; then and there the essential union of Christ and his Father, and the mystical union between Christ and believers, will be more clearly understood, than we are capable to understand them in this our imperfect state.

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Burkitt, William. "Commentary on John 14:19". Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wbc/john-14.html. 1700-1703.

Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary

19.] The immediate reference of this θεωρεῖτε is to the forty days (see Acts 10:41)—but only as leading on to its wider and deeper reference to the spiritual life.

ζῶ, not ζήσω—the principle of Life being immanent in Him.

ζήσετε, in all its fulness, including the most blessed sense of ζωή,—the Life of the Spirit,—here and hereafter. See Meyer’s note.

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Alford, Henry. "Commentary on John 14:19". Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hac/john-14.html. 1863-1878.

Charles Simeon's Horae Homileticae

DISCOURSE: 1688

OUR LIFE DEPENDENT ON THE LIFE OF CHRIST

John 14:19. Because I live, ye shall live also.

AMONGST the various sources of consolation which our Lord opened to his Disciples, to support them under the disappointment that would be occasioned by his death, a very principal one seems to have been, that they themselves would be greatly benefited by his departure: for that he would send to them his Spirit, who should more than supply the want of his bodily presence; and that he himself would more effectually advance their eternal interests than he could do if he were to continue upon earth. He assures them, that though dead as to the body, he would still live; and that, “because he lived, they should live also.”

From this declaration of his we shall make two inquiries;

I. What connexion has the life of Christ with his people’s life—

Those who are not altogether ignorant of Christ are yet more apt to think of him as a dying, than as a risen Saviour; whereas his life is not at all less connected with our salvation than his death.

His life is the ground and confirmation of all our hopes—

[What do we most wish to be assured of, in reference to Christ? We wish to know that he was indeed the Son of God, and not a common man—that he was sent of God on purpose to redeem a ruined world—and that what he did and suffered for us has been accepted in our behalf. These are points of infinite importance, and that lie at the foundation of all our hopes. But by the resurrection of Christ they are all clearly and satisfactorily ascertained: “By that he was declared to be the Son of God with power [Note: Romans 1:4.]:” by that was the sign, which above all others he himself appealed to in proof of his divine mission, fulfilled [Note: Matthew 12:38; Matthew 12:40.]: and by that is the acceptance of his sacrifice made known, since the release of our Surety is an undeniable evidence that our debt is paid [Note: Romans 4:25.].

Hence the testimony borne by the Apostles to the resurrection of Christ, was considered as a complete and sufficient proof of every thing that they asserted respecting him.”]

It is also a pledge and earnest of all our joys—

[Do we feel happiness in the thought of our being made partakers of eternal life, and in the prospect of a speedy possession of it? Behold him risen, him ascended, him seated at the right hand of God: in what capacity enjoys he all this exaltation? As a mere individual? No: but as the Head and Representative of all his people: in his resurrection, he is “the first-fruits” of which there remains a whole harvest to be gathered [Note: 1 Corinthians 15:20.]: in his ascension, he is gone as “our Forerunner,” “to prepare a place for us [Note: Hebrews 6:20. John 14:2.]:” and even enthroned as he is at the right hand of the Majesty on high, he sits not there alone; for we, though personally on earth, are mystically “made at this very hour, to sit with him in heavenly places in Christ Jesus [Note: Ephesians 2:6.].”

What then is his life but a pledge of ours, or rather an earnest? since it not only assures to us a future blessedness, but is itself the very commencement of our bliss?]

But the expression in our text intimates, that the life of Christ is not merely intimately but also inseparably, connected with the life of his people.

Let us proceed therefore to notice,

II. What security it affords them that they shall live— Here let it be considered how our Lord is occupied, and what he has engaged to do for his believing people:

1. He intercedes for them—

[As the high-priest, after offering his sacrifice, went within the vail to sprinkle the blood upon the mercy-seat, and to burn incense before it, so did our Lord ascend to heaven on purpose to complete the work he had begun, and to offer continual intercession for us at the right hand of God. Now we are assured that “him the Father heareth always;” and consequently the benefits of his intercession cannot but be poured out on all his people. Hence there is peculiar stress laid on this act of his, as ensuring to us the benefits of his death [Note: Hebrews 7:25. Romans 8:34.]. His death indeed is represented as making the atonement for our sins, and reconciling us to God; but it is his resurrection to a life of glory in heaven, that completes our justification, and perfects our salvation [Note: Romans 4:25; Romans 5:10; Romans 8:34.].]

2. He works effectually in them—

[By his Spirit he yet dwells in all his saints [Note: See ver. 17, 18.]: and he has engaged that “his grace shall be sufficient for them,” so that the weakest of them all shall be “enabled to do all things through his strength” communicated to them [Note: Philippians 4:13.]. It is this which renders them invincible: “their life is hid with Christ in God;” yea, “Christ himself is their life;” and therefore, when he shall appear in his glory, they will assuredly appear there with him [Note: Colossians 3:3-4.].]

3. He will come at last, and take them to himself—

[When they shall have fought the good fight of faith, and gained the victory over all their spiritual enemies, they will not be forgotten of him: he will send his angels to bear up their spirits to the realms of bliss; and in due time he will restore also their bodies to life; that, in a re-embodied state, they may inherit the kingdom prepared for them. This assurance he gave to his Disciples in the preceding context [Note: ver. 3.]; and when, by that event, death shall be swallowed up in victory, then will the promise in our text be finally accomplished; and their life of grace will be completed in a life of glory.]

Behold what encouragement this subject affords to all;

1. To believe on Christ—

[Were Christ unconnected with us in his present state, we might well doubt the expediency of putting our trust in him: but when we are informed that his almighty power is always occupied in forwarding our salvation, we should instantly commit ourselves into his hands, and expect from him all that our necessities can require. Do we, as creatures dead in sin, desire life? or, as persons quickened from the dead, do we desire more life? or, being possessed of life, do we desire an assurance that we shall never lose it? Behold, Jesus, who “came that we might have life, and have it more abundantly,” meets your case with exactly such a promise as you want [Note: John 10:10; John 11:25-26.]—Let me then put the question to you, “Believest thou this?” O beg of God that he would enable you so to do: say, “Lord, I believe; help thou my unbelief!”]

2. To suffer for him—

[Sufferings of some kind you must expect: there is not one of his people but has some cross to bear. You will find too at times that your trials are heavy: but the heavier they are, the more will his power be magnified in you. This thought afforded inexpressible consolation to the Apostle Paul [Note: 2 Corinthians 4:8-10.], and made him even “take pleasure” in his multiplied afflictions [Note: 2 Corinthians 12:9-10.]. Your enemies think little respecting Christ as actively engaged in behalf of his people: but in you they shall see his power and grace: and, whilst his death is exhibited in your sufferings, his life shall be manifested in your support [Note: 2 Corinthians 4:11.]. Only take the promise in the text, and you need fear nothing.]

3. To press forward for universal holiness—

[You are not called to beat the air, or to engage either in an uncertain or an unproductive contest: you have a living Saviour, that is pledged both to give you the victory, and to reward your conflicts. Will you not then fight? Will you leave a sin unmortified, an enemy unsubdued? Gird you to the combat: put on the whole armour of God: quit yourselves like men: and know assuredly, that “your labour shall not be in vain in the Lord.”]

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Simeon, Charles. "Commentary on John 14:19". Charles Simeon's Horae Homileticae. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/shh/john-14.html. 1832.

Heinrich Meyer's Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament

John 14:19. ἔτι μικρ.] sc. ἐστι. Comp. John 13:33, John 16:16; Hebrews 10:37; Hosea 1:4; Psalms 37:10.

οὐκέτι θεωρεῖ] Corporeally. Comp. also Acts 10:41.

θεωρεῖτε] But you, whilst the world no more beholds me, do behold me, although corporeally I am no more present, through the experience of my spiritual presence;(152) you behold me spiritually, in that you experience my presence and my communion with you, in the communication of myself, and in my working upon you by means of the Paraclete. The terminus a quo of the present tenses, which represent the near future as present, is, indeed, not quite the same in θεωρεῖ and θεωρεῖτε, since the κόσμος με οὐκέτι θεωρεῖ already begins with the death of Jesus, but the ὑμεῖς δὲ θεωρ. με first after His return to the Father; this distinction, however, disappears before the Johannean view of the death of Jesus as a departure to God.

ὅτι ἐγὼ ζῶ, κ. ὑμ. ζήσεσθε] Not: because I live, you also will live (Nonnus, Beza, Godet), but, corresponding to the progress of the discourse (comp. John 14:17), a statement of the reason of what precedes: for I live, and you shall live. Note the change from the present to the future, and that ζῶ and ζήσεσθε cannot without arbitrariness be taken as essentially different in idea, but that ζῶ manifestly, since it exists without interruption (present), denotes the higher life of Christ independent of death, of Christ, who, by His departure to the Father, becomes a partaker of the heavenly glory. Christ lives, for He is, indeed, Himself the Possessor and bearer of the true ζωή (comp. John 5:26); death, which translates Him into the glory of the Father, by no means breaks off this true and higher life of His (although His life ἐν σαρκί ceases), but is only the medium of the consummation and transfiguration of this His ζῆν into the everlasting heavenly ζωή and δόξα (comp. Colossians 3:3-4). Out of this consciousness the Lord here utters the words: ἐγὼ ζῶ. And He adds thereto: καὶ ὑμεῖς ζήσεσθε: and you shall live, i.e. you shall be partakers (in its temporal development on to its glorious consummation) of the same higher ζωή, liable to no death (John 11:26), under the life-giving (John 6:33) influence of the Spirit. “Stat enim illud fixum, nullam fore ejus vitam membris mortuis,” Calvin. Thus the life is in both essentially alike, only with this difference, that it is original in Jesus, and with His approaching departure is already at its glorious consummation; but in the case of the disciples, being imparted by Christ in the Holy Spirit, who is the πνεῦμα τῆς ζωῆς (Romans 8:2), it is, in the first instance, to be unfolded within (before the Parousia as the living fellowship with the exalted Christ), in order to become, at the Parousia by means of the resurrection (Romans 8:11) and relative transformation (1 Corinthians 15:51-52), the participation in His δόξα. Comp. the idea of the συζῆν τῷ χριστῷ in Paul, Romans 6:8; 2 Corinthians 7:3; 2 Timothy 2:11. The moment which assigns the reason ( ὅτι) lies simply in this, that the above two-sided ζῆν is the necessary condition of the promised θεωρεῖτέ με. If the higher ζωή, that is meant, were to be the lot only of Christ, and not also thereafter (through the working of the Spirit) that of the disciples, there could be no mention of a beholding of the Lord on the part of the disciples. The paritas rationis for the mutual relation would be wanting, and thereby the disciples would lose the capacity (the eye, as it were) to see Christ. But thus the living behold the Living One. The reference to the resurrection of Jesus has led to interpretations like that of Grotius (comp. Euth. Zigabenus): you shall see me actually alive (“non spectrum”) and remaining in life amidst the impending dangers; or (so Theophylact, comp. Kuinoel): I shall, as having risen, be alive, and you shall be as newly made alive for joy! or: I rise again, and you shall (at the last day) arise (so Augustine). Again the interpretation of ζήσεσθε in Weiss (Lehrbegr. p. 70) of the new life, which arises in the disciples through the reappearance of the Risen One, who is recognised by them (as in the case of Thomas, John 20:28), is a forced expedient, proceeding from an erroneous assumption, and is not appropriate, moreover, to ἐν ἐκείνῃ τῇ ἡμέρᾳ, John 14:20, which is definite and valid for all disciples, nor to the intimate reciprocal confidence of John 14:20-21; wherefore Weiss again, adding violence to violence, explains John 14:21 of the further unfolding of the new communion begun with the appearances of the Risen One (p. 276). Had the resurrection been spoken of, the simplest explanation would be that of Kaeuffer, p. 136: “quae instat fortunae vicissitudo nec me nec vos poterit pessumdare,” according to which, however, a thought of much too small importance would result, and, besides, the change of tense is overlooked. But if, according to the above, both ζῶ and ζήσεσθε must embrace time and eternity, then De Wette has incorrectly limited ζήσεσθε to the life of faith with its joyous victory over death and the fear of death; on the other side again, Luthardt has erroneously understood it only of the life of transfiguration after the Parousia, because ἐγὼ ζῶ can only denote the glorified life,—an assumption, however, which is unsupported, since the expression used is not ἐγὼ ζήσομαι.

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Meyer, Heinrich. "Commentary on John 14:19". Heinrich Meyer's Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hmc/john-14.html. 1832.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

John 14:19. οὐκ ἔτι, no longer) Acts 10:41, “God showed Him openly (after the Resurrection), not to all the people, but unto witnesses chosen before of God.”— θεωρεῖτέ με) ye see Me, and shall see Me, namely, alive. For even the force of the antithesis in οὐκ ἔτι, no longer, carries with it the need of supplying the Future [Whereas the world both seeth and shall see Me no more, ye both see and shall see Me].— ὅτι, because) The cause why they shall see Him.— ζῶ, I live) Not only I shall live, but I live: Revelation 1:18, “I am He that liveth, and was dead; and, behold, I am alive for evermore.”— ζήσεσθε, ye shall live) The future: for the life of believers follows the life of Jesus; and it is not of themselves, but by (of) Him that they live. Comp. ch. John 6:57, “As the living Father hath sent Me, and I live by the Father, so he that eateth Me, even he shall live by Me.”

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Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on John 14:19". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/john-14.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

The world seeth me now only with fleshly eyes; it will be but a little while, and the men of the world shall be able to see me no more; I shall be crucified, and laid in the grave; and though I shall rise again, yet I shall not be seen of them: (we read of no appearances of him after his resurrection, but to his disciples):

but ye see me, or shall see me; so they did often after his resurrection with their bodily eyes; or it may be understood of a spiritual sight by the eye of faith, or of a sight of experience; as seeing often in Scripture signifieth enjoying.

Because I live, that is, I shall live by my resurrection from the dead, and by my glorious ascension into heaven, you also shall live the life of grace here; and though your bodies must die, because of sin, yet your souls shall upon the death of your bodies live; and in the resurrection, both your souls and bodies shall live, and together be glorified with the: all this grace and mercy shall flow out to you from me as Mediator, and because I live.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on John 14:19". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/john-14.html. 1685.

Justin Edwards' Family Bible New Testament

Seeth me no more; that is, in my personal presence, the only way in which they are able to see me.

Ye see me; spiritually. See below, ver John 14:21-23.

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Edwards, Justin. "Commentary on John 14:19". "Family Bible New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/fam/john-14.html. American Tract Society. 1851.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

19.Yet a little while—A few brief hours which precede my ascension.

Ye see me—With the eye of the spirit ye recognize that Christ is present. Some one has said that if the eye of our faith were as strong as the eye of our body, we should see the angels of God around us. Much better might it be said we should see a present Jesus before us.

Because I live, ye shall live—The word live is here to be taken in the very fulness of the term life. In the very garden of Eden the giving of a Redeemer preceded the continuance of the race. Had Christ not been promised and predetermined, Adam would have produced no progeny under the irremovable curse, and sure of an unavoidable eternal ruin. Had not Christ been given, the race would not have been begotten. Hence the atonement underlies our very physical life. Grace underlies nature. Hence because Christ lives we primitively live. But more especially after his ascension, it is because he lives that we live a spiritual life during the dispensation of the Spirit, and shall live a glorified life in the kingdom of glory. Well for us, then, that Christ cannot die, but ever liveth to intercede for us. Because he liveth we shall live also.

 

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on John 14:19". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/john-14.html. 1874-1909.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

John 14:19. Yet a little while, and the world beholdeth me no longer; but ye behold me. The ‘little while’ here spoken of is that of chap, John 13:33, extending from the moment immediately at hand to the resurrection. After that ‘little while’ the world beholdeth Jesus no more, but His disciples behold Him,—the present tense being used in both clauses absolutely, and not as the mere present of time. In the first clause ‘beholdeth’ can be understood only of physical vision, for in no other way had the world ever beheld Jesus, and it is thus impossible to exclude a reference to the fact that the risen Saviour did not show Himself to the world. In the second clause ‘behold’ must be so far at least used in the same sense, and the appearance of the risen Jesus must again be thought of. Yet the meaning of the second ‘behold’ is not thus exhausted, for it obviously includes a vision of the Redeemer not limited by the forty days between the resurrection and the ascension, but stretching onward into the eternal future. The difference of vision, however, does not lie directly in the word itself: it is conditioned by the state in which Jesus is supposed to be, and by the necessities of the case. The ‘Me’ of the verse is Jesus glorified: Him, because He is glorified, the world unfit for the vision ‘beholdeth no longer.’ But the disciples, one with Him not only in His humiliation but in His ‘glory,’ behold Him, first from time to time with the eye of sense, always with the eye of faith and in the power of the Spirit. It need only be further remarked that this intensifying of the meaning of the second ‘behold’ may be indicated by the order of the original, which gives the place of emphasis to the word in the second clause; and that, by the view now taken, we at once see the connection of the words that follow: only the ‘living’ can behold the risen Lord, or have the abiding spiritual sight.

Because I live and ye shall live. Not, ‘Because I live ye shall live also,’—which would divert the thoughts to something entirely foreign to the course of our Lord’s remarks; but, Because I live glorified, and ye, in this respect wholly different from the world, shall live in the power of Me your risen Lord, therefore shall this intimacy of intercourse, implied in My coming and your beholding, last unbroken and for ever.

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Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on John 14:19". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/john-14.html. 1879-90.

The Expositor's Greek Testament

John 14:19. In a short time, , the world would no longer see Him, but His disciples would be conscious of His presence, , present for immediate future. His presence would be manifested in their new life which they would trace to Him, , . This is confirmed by Paul’s “No longer I, but Christ liveth in me”. Galatians 2:20. The grand evidence of Christ’s continued life and presence is the Christian life of the disciple.

 

 

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Nicol, W. Robertson, M.A., L.L.D. "Commentary on John 14:19". The Expositor's Greek Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/john-14.html. 1897-1910.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

The world seeth me no more, after my death; but you shall see me, conversing with you for forty days, after my resurrection. (Witham)

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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on John 14:19". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/john-14.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

a little while; i.e. about thirty hours. From the moment the Lord was taken down from the cross and entombed, He disappeared from the eyes of the world. Acts 10:40, Acts 10:41.

no more. Greek. ouk eti.

shall live also = also shall live.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on John 14:19". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/john-14.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

Yet a little while, and the world seeth me no more; but ye see me: because I live, ye shall live also.

Yet a little while, and the world seeth ('beholdeth') me no more; but ye see - `behold' me. His bodily presence being all the sight of Him which the world was capable of, they were to behold Him no more on His departure to the Father: whereas by the coming of the Spirit the presence of Christ was not only continued to His spiritually enlightened disciples, but rendered far more efficacious and blissful than His bodily presence had been before.

Because I live, ye shall live also. He does not say, 'When I shall live, after My resurrection from the dead,' but "Because I do live;" for it is of that inextinguishable divine life which He was even then living that He is speaking-in reference to which His approaching death and resurrection were but as momentary shadows passing over the sun's glorious disc. See Luke 24:5; Revelation 1:18. And this grand saying Jesus uttered with death immediately in view. What a brightness does this throw over the next clause, ye shall live also!

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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on John 14:19". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/john-14.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(19) Yet a little while.—Comp. John 13:33; John 16:16.

But ye see me—i.e., in the spiritual presence of the Paraclete. The words may indeed have their first fulfilment in the appearances of the forty days (comp. Acts 10:41), but these appearances were themselves steps in the education which was leading the disciples from a trust in the physical to a trust in the spiritual presence. (Comp. John 20:17.) To the world the grave seemed the closing scene. They saw Him no more; they thought of Him as dead. To the believers who had the power to see Him He appeared as living, and in very deed was more truly with them and in them than He had been before.

Because I live, ye shall live also.—Better, for I live, and ye shall live. Our Lord speaks of His own life in the present. It is the essential life of which He is Himself the Source, and which is not affected by the physical death through which He is about to pass. They also who believe in Him shall have even here this principle of life, which in them too shall be affected by no change, but shall develop into the fulness of the life hereafter. Because He lives, and because they too shall live, therefore shall they see Him and realise His presence when the world seeth Him no more.

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on John 14:19". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/john-14.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Yet a little while, and the world seeth me no more; but ye see me: because I live, ye shall live also.
a little
7:33; 8:21; 12:35; 13:33; 16:16,22
because
6; 6:56-58; 11:25; Romans 5:10; 8:34; 1 Corinthians 15:20,45; 2 Corinthians 4:10-12; Colossians 3:3,4; Hebrews 7:25; 1 John 1:1-3
Reciprocal: Leviticus 14:6 - the living bird;  1 Samuel 25:29 - with the Lord;  Psalm 18:46 - Lord;  Psalm 72:15 - And he;  Ezekiel 47:9 - shall live;  Hosea 6:2 - we;  Matthew 23:39 - Ye shall not;  Matthew 26:11 - but;  Luke 13:35 - Ye shall not;  Luke 20:38 - for all;  Luke 22:32 - I have;  Luke 24:15 - Jesus;  John 5:26 - so hath;  John 6:47 - He that;  John 6:57 - even;  John 8:35 - but;  John 10:28 - they;  John 16:19 - A little;  John 20:19 - came;  Romans 6:8 - we believe;  Romans 8:10 - but;  Galatians 2:20 - but;  2 Timothy 2:11 - we shall;  Hebrews 7:8 - he liveth;  1 Peter 2:4 - a living;  Revelation 1:18 - that liveth

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on John 14:19". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/john-14.html.

Commentary by J.C.Philpot on select texts of the Bible

John 14:19

"Yet a little while, and the world sees me no more; but you see me—because I live, you shall live also." John 14:19

Communion with Christ rests on three things—seeing him by faith, living upon his life, and experiencing his manifested presence. But all these three things depend on his resurrection and a knowledge of its power. As risen from the dead, the saints see him; as risen from the dead, they live a life of faith upon him; as risen from the dead, he manifests himself unto them; and as life and feeling spring up in their souls from sweet communion with him, the power of his resurrection becomes manifest in them.

This communion, therefore, with the Lord Jesus as a risen Head all the reconciled and justified saints of God are pressing forward after, according to the measure of their grace and the life and power of God in their soul. It is indeed often sadly interrupted and grievously broken through, by the sin that dwells in us. But the principle is there, for that principle is life; and life is the privilege, the possession, and the distinction of the children of God. You need none to assure you that Jesus is risen from the dead if he manifests himself to your soul. You need no evidence that you are one of his sheep if you have heard and know his voice. So you may say, "Jesus is risen, for I have seen him; Jesus is risen, for I have heard him; Jesus is risen, for I live upon him."

Communion with Jesus is the life of religion, and indeed without it religion is but an empty name. If without him we can do nothing; if he is our life, our risen covenant Head, our Advocate with the Father, our Husband, our Friend, our Brother, how are we to draw sap out of his fullness, as the branch from the vine, or to know him personally and experimentally in any one of his endearing relationships, unless by continual communion with him on his throne of grace? In fact, this is the grand distinguishing point between the living and the dead, between the true child of God and the mere professor, that the one has real union and communion with a risen Jesus, and the other is satisfied with a form of godliness. Every quickened soul is made to feel after the power of God, after communion from above, after pardon and peace, after visitations of mercy and grace; and when he has had a view of Christ by faith, and some revelation of his Person and work, grace and glory, nothing afterwards can ever really satisfy him but that inward communion of spirit with Jesus whereby the Lord and he become one; "for he that is joined to the Lord is one spirit."

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Bibliographical Information
Philpot, Joseph Charles. "Commentary on John 14:19". Commentary by J.C.Philpot on select texts of the Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jcp/john-14.html.

Ernst Hengstenberg on John, Revelation, Ecclesiastes, Ezekiel & Psalms

Ver. 19. "Yet a little while, and the world seeth Me no more; but ye see Me: because I live, ye shall live also."

That the world which was to be excluded from seeing Christ is primarily the unbelieving Jewish people, is shown by ch. John 7:33, where Jesus says to the Jews, "Yet a little while am I with you: ye shall seek Me, and shall not find Me." To see Christ no longer is the climax of all misery: for in Him is the fountain of all true joy; and when He departs, the Divine judgments throng in on all sides. The words, "Because I live," etc., are the foundation of the promise that the disciples should see Christ. In the life of Christ Himself lies the guarantee that His disciples should live. But the condition of that life was, that they should see Him. Seeing Christ and living are, with the Apostles, everywhere and inseparably one and the same: He is the centre of their being. When they see Him not, they are as dead in a living body. The life of Christ must develop itself in His disciples further and further until the joyful resurrection: comp. ch. John 11:25. But, according to the connection, that life alone is here pre-eminently meant which unfolded itself in the Apostles immediately with the resurrection. Life is, in the Old Testament, wherever there is contentment and joy: comp. Job 21:7; Proverbs 16:15.

According to some critics, the present, ζῶ, stands here instead of the future. But that would involve the necessity of the present being substituted afterwards for the future, ζήσεσθε. Jesus had described Himself in ver. 6 as the life. There is, therefore, no ground whatever for an enfeebling interpretation. Jesus not merely will live, but He is, under all circumstances, the Living; and in the fact that He lives is the pledge given that He will live, and that His disciples shall live with Him. Berl. Bible: "Life is His essential nature; dying is a strange thing, but now necessary to Him." That which is a strange thing can only be transitory. In Luke 24:5-6, the angels say to the women, "Why seek ye the living among the dead? He is not here. He is risen." Christ did not become alive again—the ἠγέρθη does not accord with that—but He is the Living One under all circumstances; and in the fact that He is always the Living One lies the ground of His resurrection. In Acts 2:24, Peter says concerning Christ, "Whom God raised up, having loosed the pains of death, because it was not possible that He should be holden of it." The impossibility rested upon this, that He was the essentially Living. The ζωῆς ἀκαταλύτος which, according to Hebrews 7:16, dwells inherently in Christ, elevates Him above the law of death. In Revelation 1:18, we read that Christ approved Himself the "Living One" by the overcoming of death.

The life of His disciples is the necessary consequence of the life of Christ. As the Living, He is also the life-distributing: He cannot rest until He has vanquished for His people death in all its forms, and abolished it utterly. In the Old Testament God is called the living God, for the consolation of His people who sink into death. David thirsts for the living God, Psalms 42:3, because, as such. He was the God of his life, ver. 9, distributing life to His own. But as the Living One is the source of life to His own, so He is the source of death to His enemies. Because He liveth, they must die. The first form of that death is their seeing Him no more.

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Hengstenberg, Ernst. "Commentary on John 14:19". Ernst Hengstenberg on John, Revelation, Ecclesiastes, Ezekiel & Psalms. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/heg/john-14.html.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

19.Yet a little while. He continues the commendation of special grace, which ought to have been sufficient for alleviating, and even for removing the grief of the disciples. “When I shall have withdrawn,” says he, “from the view of the world: still I shall be present with you.” That we may enjoy this secret beholding of Christ, we must not judge of his presence or his absence according to carnal perception, but we must earnestly employ the eyes of faith for contemplating his power. Thus believers always have Christ present by his Spirit, and behold him, though they be distant from him in body.

Because I live. This statement may be explained in two ways. Either it may be viewed as a confirmation of the former clause, because I live, and you shall live; or, it may be read separately, because I live, you also shall live; and then the meaning will be, that believers will live, because Christ liveth I willingly embrace the former opinion, and yet we may draw from it the other doctrine, that the life of Christ is the cause of our life. He begins by pointing out the cause of the difference, why he shall be seen by his disciples, and not by the world It isn’t because Christ cannot be seen but according to the spiritual life, of which the world is deprived. The world seeth not Christ; this is not wonderful, for the death of blindness is the cause; but as soon as any man begins to live by the Spirit, he is immediately endued with eyes to see Christ. Now, the reason of this is, that our life is closely connected with the life of Christ, and proceeds from it as from its source; for we are dead in ourselves, and the life with which we flatter ourselves is a very bad death. Accordingly, when the question is, how we are to obtain life, our eyes must be directed to Christ, and his life must be conveyed to us by faith, that our consciences may be fully convinced, that, so long as Christ lives, we are free from all danger of destruction; for it is an undoubted truth, that his life would be nothing, when his members were dead.

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Calvin, John. "Commentary on John 14:19". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/john-14.html. 1840-57.