Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

John 14:18

"I will not leave you as orphans; I will come to you.
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Afflictions and Adversities;   Communion;   God;   Jesus, the Christ;   Jesus Continued;   Righteous;   Scofield Reference Index - World-System;   Thompson Chain Reference - Christ;   Comfort;   Comfort-Misery;   Constancy, Divine;   Divine;   Friendship-Friendlessness;   Future, the;   Heaven;   Heavenly;   Holy Spirit;   Home;   Promises, Divine;   Spirit;   The Topic Concordance - Comfort;   Giving and Gifts;   Holy Spirit;   Jesus Christ;   Life;   Truth;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Afflicted Saints;   Affliction, Consolation under;   Communion with God;  
Dictionaries:
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Holy spirit;   Resurrection;   Teacher;   Trinity;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Comfort;   Consolation;   Counselor;   Faith;   Feasts and Festivals of Israel;   Follow, Follower;   Orphan;   Sanctification;   Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Holy Ghost;   Easton Bible Dictionary - Adoption;   Coming of Christ;   Orphans;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Advocate;   Baptism;   Holy Spirit, the;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Fatherless;   Helper;   Security of the Believer;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Advocate;   Children (Sons) of God;   God;   Holy Spirit;   John, Theology of;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Brotherhood (2);   Character;   Comfort (2);   Coming Again;   Communion (2);   Death of Christ;   Desolation;   Devotion;   Force;   Foresight;   Gentleness (2);   Kenosis;   Manuscripts;   Parousia;   Religious Experience;   Sanctify, Sanctification;   Spirit ;   Trinity (2);   Unity (2);   The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Fruit;   Holy ghost;   Pentecost;   Samuel;  
Encyclopedias:
Condensed Biblical Cyclopedia - Kingdom or Church of Christ, the;   International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Authority in Religion;   Blasphemy;   Comfortless;   Eschatology of the New Testament;   Fatherless;   Johannine Theology, the;   Orphan;   Paraclete;   Parousia;   Trinity;  
Devotionals:
Daily Light on the Daily Path - Devotion for December 28;   Every Day Light - Devotion for March 9;   Faith's Checkbook - Devotion for February 4;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

I will not leave you comfortless - Literally, orphans. The original word ορφανος, is by some derived from ορφνος, obscure, dark, because, says Mintert, an orphan (one deprived of father and mother) is little esteemed, neglected, and is obliged to wander about in obscurity and darkness. Others derive it from the Hebrew חרף charaph, to strip or make bare, despoil, because such a child is destitute of comfort, direction, and support, and is a prey to misery and disease, to sin and to death.

The disciples of a particular teacher among the Hebrews called him father; his scholars were called his children, and, on his death, were considered as orphans. Christ calls his disciples children, beloved children, John 13:33; and, now that he is about to be removed from them by death, he assures them that they shall not be left fatherless, or without a teacher; for in a little time he should come again, (rise from the dead), and, after his ascension, they should be made partakers of that Spirit which would be their comforter, advocate, teacher, and guide for ever.

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Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on John 14:18". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/john-14.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Comfortless - Greek, “orphans.” Jesus here addresses them as children, John 13:33. He says that he would show them the kindness of a parent, and, though he was going away, he would provide for their future welfare. And even while he was absent, yet they would sustain to him still the relation of children. Though he was to die, yet he would live again; though absent in body, yet he would be present with them by his Spirit; though he was to go away to heaven, yet he would return again to them. See John 14:3.

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on John 14:18". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/john-14.html. 1870.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

I will not leave you desolate: I come unto you.

Desolate ... actually means "orphans"; and from this premise, "I come unto you" is not speaking of the second advent but of an interim coming of the Lord in the person of the Holy Spirit on Pentecost and afterward. The second advent was in view in John 14:3, but here the coming of Christ's Spirit is meant. Hendriksen ably defended this interpretation thus, "The immediately preceding context refers to the outpouring of the Holy Spirit, and so does the following context."[16]

ENDNOTE:

[16] William Hendriksen, op. cit., II, p. 279.

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Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
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Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on John 14:18". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/john-14.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

I will not leave you comfortless,.... Gr. "orphans", or "fatherless". Christ stands in the relation of a Father to his people, and they are his children, his spiritual seed and offspring; and so the disciples might fear, that as Christ was going from them, they should be left as children without a father, in a very desolate and comfortless, condition: to support them against these fears, Christ promises that he would not leave them thus, at least not long:

I will come to you; in a very short time, as he did; for on the third day he rose again from the dead, and appeared to them, which filled them with great joy. So among the Jews, disciples, and the world too, are represented as fatherless, when their doctors and wise men are removed by death. Says R. Aba,F24Zohar in Num fol. 96. 3. & in Lev. fol. 42. 3. & in Exod. fol. 10. 3. & 28. 3. and so sometimes others, concerning R. Simeon ben Jochai,

"woe to the world when thou shall go out of it, woe to the generation that shall be in the world when thou shall remove from them, וישתארון יתמין, "and they shall be left fatherless by thee".'

And in another placeF25Midrash Hannealam in Zohar in Gen. fol. 65. 4. ;

"afterwards R. Akiba went out and cried, and his eyes flowed with water, and he said, woe Rabbi, woe Rabbi, for the world is left, יתום, "fatherless by thee".'

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on John 14:18". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/john-14.html. 1999.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

I will not leave (ουκ απησωouk aphēsō). Future active of απιημιaphiēmi to send away, to leave behind.

Desolate (ορπανουςorphanous). Old word (ορποςorphos Latin orbus), bereft of parents, and of parents bereft of children. Common in papyri of orphan children. In John 13:33 Jesus called the disciples τεκνιαteknia (little children), and so naturally the word means “orphans” here, but the meaning may be “helpless” (without the other Paraclete, the Holy Spirit). The only other N.T. example is in James 1:27 where it means “fatherless.”

I come
(ερχομαιerchomai). Futuristic present as in John 14:3.

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The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)
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Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on John 14:18". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/john-14.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Vincent's Word Studies

Leave ( ἀφήσω )

See on John 4:3.

Comfortless ( ὀρφανούς )

Literally, bereft or orphans. Only here and James 1:27, where it is rendered fatherless. Compare my little children (John 13:33). “He hath not left us without a rule (John 13:34); nor without an example (John 13:15); nor without a motive (John 14:15); nor without a strength (John 15:5); nor without a warning (John 15:2, John 15:6); nor without a Comforter (John 14:18); nor without a reward (John 14:2) (James Ford, “The Gospel of St. John Illustrated”).

I will come ( ἔρχομαι )

Present tense, I come. See on John 14:3.

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Vincent, Marvin R. DD. "Commentary on John 14:18". "Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/vnt/john-14.html. Charles Schribner's Sons. New York, USA. 1887.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

I will not leave you comfortless: I will come to you.

I will not leave you orphans — A word that is elegantly applied to those who have lost any dear friend.

I come to you — What was certainly and speedily to be, our Lord speaks of as if it were already.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
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Wesley, John. "Commentary on John 14:18". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/john-14.html. 1765.

The Fourfold Gospel

I will not leave you desolate1: I come unto you.

  1. I will not leave you desolate. Literally, orphans. The expression breathes the spirit of a father, as at John 13:33.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website. These files were made available by Mr. Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.
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J. W. McGarvey and Philip Y. Pendleton. "Commentary on John 14:18". "The Fourfold Gospel". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tfg/john-14.html. Standard Publishing Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 1914.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

Не оставлю вас сиротами. Это место учит, чем являются и что могут люди, лишенные защиты Духа. Они сироты, подверженные любому обману и несправедливости, неспособные управлять собой, и потому не годные ни к какому делу. От такой беды есть единственное средство – Христос должен Сам править нами через Свой Дух, что Он и обещает здесь сделать. Итак, вначале Он наставляет учеников в их немощи, дабы, отчаявшись в себе, они зависели только от Его защиты. А затем, обещав защиту, Он воздвигает их к надежде, утверждая, что всегда пребудет среди них. Говоря: «приду к вам», Христос показывает, каким образом

Он обитает в нас и наполняет нас Собой. Через силу Своего Духа. Отсюда явствует: благодать Духа – знаменательное свидетельство божества Христова.

 

 

 

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Calvin, John. "Commentary on John 14:18". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/john-14.html. 1840-57.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

18 I will not leave you comfortless: I will come to you.

Ver. 18. I will not leave you comfortless] Orphans, or darkling, ορφανους ab ορφνη, tenebrae. I your Lord am taken indeed from your head for a while, but you shall have the supply of my Spirit, Philippians 1:19. And I, even I, will come again to you ere long; yea, I am now upon the way; I come to fetch you, I come to meet you, I come, I come, ερχομαι, Dedit me in viam.

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on John 14:18". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/john-14.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

John 14:18. I will not leave you comfortless: ' Ορφανους, orphans, He had called them his dear children, — τεκνια,— John 13:33 of the last chapter. "Encourage yourselves therefore with the pleasing expectation of the promised Comforter, who will be as a Father to you, and fully supply my place; and I myself will be with you in my Godhead, to strengthen and console you, and visit you with the most valuable tokens of my constant care."

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Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on John 14:18". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/john-14.html. 1801-1803.

Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament

Here observe, 1. The condition which the disciples were in upon the account of Christ's removal from them, and that was sad and comfortless: fatherless or orphans, as the word signifies.

Learn hence, That Christ's departure, or the loss of his gracious presence, is very sad and comfortless to a pious soul; well might the disciples here lament and mourn upon the occasion of Christ; leaving of them, seeing thereby they should be deprived of his doctrine and instructions, of his advice and counsel, and of the benefit of his holy and instructive example.

Observe, 2. The care of Christ for his disciples, in reference to this their sad and disconsolate condition; He would not leave them comfortless.

Where note, He doth not say, I will not suffer you to be comfortless, but I will not leave you so; that is, he will not desert or disown them in their comfortless condition: he will not leave them, either in point of affection, or in point of activity; he will not cease to love them, nor cease to bestir himself for them.

Learn hence, That Christ will not leave his friends in a sad and comnfortless state and condition, though for a time they may be brought into it: I will not leave you comfortless, I will come unto you. Christ's coming here unto them, is to be understood of his coming to them by his Holy Spirit; in the gifts of it, in the graces of it, and in the comforts of it: thus he did not long leave them comfortless, but at the feast of Pentecost came to them again.

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Burkitt, William. "Commentary on John 14:18". Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wbc/john-14.html. 1700-1703.

Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary

18.] ὀρφ. should be orphans, as in the E. V. mar(196).

The office of the παράκλ. is to connect the disciples with the Father: if therefore they had Him not, they would be fatherless. The expression connects with τεκνία ch. John 13:33, and as Euthym(197), springs from πατρικὴ εὐσπλαγχνία. This makes ἔρχομαι, I am coming, plain, as applying to the coming by the Spirit, who is one with Christ;—not only the ultimate personal coming, which is but the last step of the ἔρχομαι, nor only the bodily coming again to them and not to the world at the Resurrection, which was but a pledge of His lasting presence in the Spirit: see on John 14:3. ἔρχομαι is (as there) the complex of these—the great Revisitation, in all its blessed progress. The absence of any connecting particle as γάρ, with ἔρχομαι, arises (Meyer) from the depth of affection in the Lord’s heart.

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Alford, Henry. "Commentary on John 14:18". Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hac/john-14.html. 1863-1878.

Heinrich Meyer's Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament

John 14:18. Development of the consolatory element in this promised communication of the Spirit, onwards to John 14:21.

οὐκ ἀφήσω ὑμ. ὀρφ.] I will not leave you behind, as those who (after my departure) are to be orphans (John 14:27; Mark 12:19; Tobit 11:2; Sirach 6:2; 1 Maccabees 12:41; Soph. Aj. 491; Phil. 484). The expression itself (comp. τεκνία, John 13:33) is that of the πατρικὴ εὐσπλαγχνία (Euth. Zigabenus).

ἔρχομαι πρὸς ὑμᾶς] Without mediatory particle ( γάρ) in the intensity of the emotional affection. That Jesus means by this coming, i.e. according to the connection coming again (see on John 4:16), not the final historical Parousia (Augustine, Beda, Maldonatus, Paulus, Luthardt, Hofmann), is shown by the whole of the following context (quite otherwise, John 14:3). See, especially, John 14:19, where it is not the world, but the disciples who are to see Him, which is as little appropriate to the Parousia as the ἔτι μικρόν;(150) further, John 14:20-21, where spiritual fellowship is spoken of, the knowledge of which cannot first begin with the Parousia, and John 14:23, where μονὴν παρʼ αὐτῷ ποιησ. is not in harmony with the idea of the Parousia, since in this the disciples take up their abode with God (John 14:3, comp. 2 Corinthians 5:8), not God with them, which takes place through the communication of the Spirit. Most of the older expositors refer to the Resurrection of Christ, and to the new union with the Risen One. So Chrysostom, Theophylact, Euth. Zigabenus, Ruperti, Erasmus, Grotius, and many others, and again Kaeuffer, Hilgenfeld, Weiss, and, with a spiritualizing view of the resurrection, Ewald. But opposed to this are John 14:20-21; John 14:23; John 16:16; John 16:22-23, expressions all of which equally point to a higher spiritual fellowship,(151) as the οὐκ ἀφ. ὑμ. ὀρφ. also already presupposes a new abiding union. Justly, therefore, have most of the moderns (Lücke, Tholuck, Olshausen, B. Crusius, Frommann, Köstlin, Reuss, Maier, Baeumlein, Godet, Scholten, but also already Calvin and several others) understood by the Paraclete the spiritual coming of Christ, in which He Himself, only in another form of existence, came to the disciples. It is not yet, indeed, the consummation of the reunion; this latter first takes place at the Parousia, and therefore up to that time the state of orphanage still relatively continues, the community seeks its Lord (John 13:33), and waits for Him; and believers have to regard themselves as ἐκδημοῦντες ἀπὸ τοῦ κυρίου (2 Corinthians 5:6), whose life in Him with God is not yet revealed (Colossians 3:1-4) (in answer to Luthardt’s objections). Others explain it in a twofold sense, so that Christ intended His Resurrection, and at the same time His spiritual return. So Luther, Beza, Lampe, Bengel, Kuinoel, De Wette, Brückner, Lange, Ebrard; where De Wette, with this interpretation, assigns the first place to the spiritual thought, as also Hengstenberg. But the bodily ἔρχεσθαι is not indicated at all (as, if so, it would have been, in opposition to the mission of the Paraclete, by the addition of an ἐγὼ αὐτός), and the entire promise of the Paraclete, of which the present passage is an integral part, transports to a time in which the Resurrection of Christ had long passed. Generally, however, to maintain a twofold sense can only be justified by evidence from the connection.

OBSERVATION.

That Jesus, according to John, does not speak at all in express terms of His resurrection, but only in allusions like John 2:19, John 10:17-18, is in entire harmony with the spiritual character of the Gospel, according to which the return of the Paraclete was the principal thing on which the hopes of the disciples had to fix themselves. From death to the δόξα, out of which Jesus had to send the Spirit, the resurrection formed only the transition. But that He also cannot have in reality predicted His resurrection with such definiteness as it is related in the Synoptics, is clear from the whole behaviour of the disciples before and after the occurrence of the resurrection, so that in this point also the preference belongs to the Johannean account. See on Matthew 16:21.

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Meyer, Heinrich. "Commentary on John 14:18". Heinrich Meyer's Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hmc/john-14.html. 1832.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

John 14:18. οὐκ ἀφήσω, I will not leave) although you fear that I will. Ye shall have joy from Me and from the Father.(351) This is the consolation given to those who were fearing that they should be orphans.— ὑμᾶς, you) O little children: ch. John 13:33.— ὀρφανοὺς, orphans [Engl. Vers. loses the force, ‘comfortless’]) The tie of relationship which the disciples had was with Christ, not with the world.— ἔρχομαι, I come) The Present implying the speediness of His coming. I come, after the resurrection; My presence not being done away with after the Ascension, but confirmed by it. Also saith He, I come, not, I return. All His other Comings are rather continuations of His first Coming than repetitions of it. Also He says, in the Present, I come, and presently after, Ye see, and, I live, in John 14:19 : this is owing to the very vivid realising of the thing as present, which was about to be immediately after, and for certain: John 14:27, “Peace I leave (Present) with you, My peace I give,” etc.

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Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on John 14:18". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/john-14.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Comfortless; the word in the Greek is, orphans, persons without father and mother, who for the most part are the most comfortless persons; therefore it is translated comfortless: Christ hath a care, not only of the people’s salvation and life, but also of their comforts while they are here; he will not leave his people without proportionable comfort for their distresses.

I will come to you; in the Greek it is, I do come to you, to denote the certainty and the suddenness of his coming; which is either to be understood of his resurrection, which was (as we know) after the absence of three days; or, which is more probable, (for after his resurrection he stayed with them but a few days), in and by his blessed Spirit, (for the Spirit is called the Spirit of Christ), who was to come, and to abide with them for ever. Though it may also have a reference to his coming again to judge both the quick and the dead, to receive them to himself, that (as he said before) they might always be where he was; but the two former senses are understood as more specially relating to their present distresses, upon account of his bodily absence from them.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on John 14:18". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/john-14.html. 1685.

Justin Edwards' Family Bible New Testament

Comfortless; literally, orphans, bereft of my presence, as children of the presence of their father.

Come to you; spiritually, through the Comforter.

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Edwards, Justin. "Commentary on John 14:18". "Family Bible New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/fam/john-14.html. American Tract Society. 1851.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

18.Will come to you—Here doubtless is a coming which is not bodily but spiritual. So Christ promised to his apostles, (Matthew 28:20,) “I am with you always, even to the end of the world.” And this perpetual presence is consistent with his perpetual absence. And so the coming of the present verse is not the bodily coming of the final day, but inasmuch as the Spirit is the spirit of Christ, so Christ is present both in his own spirit as Son of God, and in his representative the Holy Spirit.

 

 

 

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on John 14:18". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/john-14.html. 1874-1909.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

John 14:18. I will not leave you desolate: I come to you. The disciples were the ‘little children’ of Jesus (chap. John 13:33), and He may therefore well speak to them as a father. Not from Pentecost, but from the moment of His reunion to the Father, and by means of the Spirit of the truth, He comes to them (see John 14:20).

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Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on John 14:18". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/john-14.html. 1879-90.

The Expositor's Greek Testament

John 14:18. Great as was the promise of this other helper, this spirit of truth, it did not seem to compensate for the departure of Jesus. “Another,” any other, was unable to fill the blank; it was Himself they craved. Therefore He goes on, · , “I will not abandon you as orphans,” (orbus) “bereaved,” used of fathers bereft of children (1 Thessalonians 2:17, Dionys. Hal., i.); as well as of children bereft of parents. See Elsner. , Euthymius. Cf.Psalms 9:14, . Wetstein quotes Rabbi Akiba as lamenting the death of Rabbi Eleazar, “Vae mihi ’ quia totam hanc generationem reliquisti orphanam”. The utter helplessness of the disciples without their Master is indicated, . From the absence of it may be gathered that Jesus means to point out not so much that it is He who is coming through the spirit to them, as that His apparent departure is really a nearer approach.

 

 

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Nicol, W. Robertson, M.A., L.L.D. "Commentary on John 14:18". The Expositor's Greek Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/john-14.html. 1897-1910.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

comfortless = orphans. Greek. or phanos. Occurs only here and James 1:27.

will come = am coming. As in John 14:3.

to. Greek. pros. App-104.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on John 14:18". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/john-14.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

I will not leave you comfortless: I will come to you.

I will not leave you comfortless, [ orfanous (Greek #3737)] - 'orphans,' as in the margin; in a bereaved and desolate condition.

I will come to you, [ erchomai (Greek #2064)] - rather, 'I am coming to you;' that is, by the Spirit, since it was His presence that was to make Christ's personal departure from them to be no bereavement.

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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on John 14:18". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/john-14.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(18) I will not leave you comfortless.—Better with the margin, I will not leave you orphans, which exactly represents the Greek word. “Comfortless” is unfortunate, as it suggests a connection with “Comforter” which does not exist in the original. Our translators have rendered the word by “fatherless” in James 1:27, which is the only other passage where it occurs in the New Testament, and Wiclif has “faderless” here. He thinks of them as His children whom He is leaving in the world (comp. John 13:33), but He will not leave them destitute and bereaved.

I will come to you.—This coming, as is shown by the whole context, is the spiritual presence in the person of the Paraclete.

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on John 14:18". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/john-14.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

I will not leave you comfortless: I will come to you.
will not
16,27; 16:33; Psalms 23:4; Isaiah 43:1; 51:12; 66:11-13; 2 Corinthians 1:2-6; 2 Thessalonians 2:16; Hebrews 2:18
comfortless
or, orphans.
Lamentations 5:3; Hosea 14:3
will come
3,28; Psalms 101:2; Hosea 6:3; Matthew 18:20; 28:20
Reciprocal: Psalm 141:8 - leave not my soul destitute;  Proverbs 10:24 - the desire;  Proverbs 14:10 - and;  Luke 24:15 - Jesus;  John 6:19 - walking;  John 14:21 - and will;  Acts 23:11 - the Lord;  2 Corinthians 1:4 - comforteth;  2 Corinthians 4:8 - not in despair;  Philippians 2:1 - any consolation

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on John 14:18". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/john-14.html.

Ernst Hengstenberg on John, Revelation, Ecclesiastes, Ezekiel & Psalms

In vers. 18-24 we have the fifth ground of consolation: Christ comes again.

Ver. 18. "I will not leave you comfortless (orphans); I will come unto you."

Our Lord does not place His own coming in opposition to the coming of the Holy Ghost. He does not say, I Myself will come; for even in the Divine Spirit it is He who comes to His disciples. He says positively, I come, that the disciples might not fall into the comfortless notion that they would not henceforth have to do with Him directly, and that the Holy Ghost would interpose as a separating medium between Him and them. He gives them, the assurance, that even after His departure they would remain in the most immediate connection with Himself. The evidence that Christ, even after His return to the Father, held personal intercourse with His disciples, in harmony with this promise, and therefore that the being in the Spirit furnished only the basis of this intercourse, we find primarily in the appearances of the risen Lord, but also in the history of Stephen, who, according to Acts 7:55-56, saw the heaven opened, and Jesus standing at the right hand of God, and who, in ver. 59, said to the immediately present Redeemer, "Lord Jesus, receive my spirit;" and in ver. 60, "Lord, lay not this sin to their charge." Then the Apocalypse, the first chapter of which records a manifestation of Christ to the Apostle; a manifestation which, however, presupposes the ἐγενόμην ἐν πνεύματι, ver. 10. How little the Spirit is to be regarded as a restricting medium of partition, which precludes the Lord from any direct operation upon earth, is shown by the history of Saul's conversion, in which Christ comes to the persecutor without even any preliminary reference to the Holy Ghost at all.

What coming of Christ is here spoken of? Certainly not His return at the end of the world; for in that case He would have left His disciples long orphans, and the consolation would have been comfortless enough. According to ver. 19, the coming was soon to begin; and the characteristic distinction, "the world seeth Me not," would not be at all suitable to the eschatological return, inasmuch as at His final coming all the nations are to be gathered into His presence. Matthew 25:32. Nor can the manifestations of the risen Lord exclusively be meant; for the Redeemer does not speak of what should be the prerogative of a few elect, but of what should be the portion of all His believers in every age and continually: comp. especially the μονὴν παρʼ αὐτῷ ποιησόμεθα in ver. 23, which cannot be referred to the appearances after the resurrection; and generally vers. 21 and 23, which, taking their whole contents, cannot, without great violence, be limited to those appearances of the risen Lord, as is all the more evident if we compare the strikingly coincident parallel in Revelation 3:20. There the Redeemer stands before the door of every one who belongs to the number of His people; and His coming notes a relation, the effect of which runs through the whole earthly existence of believers, "like heaven upon earth, and the brightness which irradiates the night." The promise, "I will not leave you comfortless," was but very imperfectly fulfilled in the manifestations of the Lord occurring in the interval between the resurrection and the ascension. It points to a permanent connection. On the other hand, we must not by any means exclude those intermediate manifestations of the risen Lord. When Jesus says here, in ver. 19, "Yet a little while, and the world seeth Me no more; but ye see Me," every one must refer the words primarily to the appearances after the resurrection, especially as these have that characteristic mark in common with all later spiritual manifestations, that the world does not participate in them, but that they belonged exclusively to believers: comp. Acts 10:40-41, "Him God raised up the third day, and showed Him openly, not to all the people, but unto witnesses chosen before of God." This view is confirmed by the parallel passage, ch. John 16:16; John 16:22, which may well serve as a comment upon our ver. 19. But the appearances of our risen Lord must not be excluded; and all the less as the result of the coming of Christ here in ver. 19 is seen to be the invigoration of His disciples, a result which notoriously first followed at the resurrection of their Lord. When the risen Redeemer first appeared to His disciples, they rose immediately from the death of languor and despondency: comp. Psalms 72:15. It is evident that a false apprehension of the resurrection has placed in opposition things which are in fact perfectly accordant. When Christ arose with a glorified body. His appearances were a type and prelude of that living intercourse which, according to Matthew 18:20; Matthew 28:20, is to subsist between Christ and His Church to the end of the world; and what in Acts 1:3 is recorded as historical fact, bears at the same time the character of a prophecy, which in its fulfilment runs through all the ages of time. Only thus is it to be explained, that St Paul, in 1 Corinthians 15:7-8, places the manifestation of that which was given to himself after the ascension on the same level with the manifestations of the risen Lord before the ascension.

Here we have the real secret of the strength of believers in their conflict with the world, which in number and equipments far preponderates. It is their concealed intercourse with that Jesus to whom all power in heaven and earth is given, that enables them to look down upon the earth far below their feet. When the waves of the world's wrath run high, they say to Him, "Be not a terror unto me; Thou art my hope in the day of evil," Jeremiah 17:17.

God in the Old Testament bears the honourable appellation of the God of the orphans, Psalms 68:6; He is described as one with whom the fatherless findeth mercy, Hosea 14:3; and also with special reference to His suffering Church upon earth. This His high title God will make good, so far as concerns the disciples, and especially the Apostles, through Christ, with whom all the treasures of His mercy and power are laid up, and who, in Old Testament prophecy, was once called the Everlasting Father, Isaiah 9:6. Their orphanhood, their abandonment, their misery, must not make them dispirited; it must rather fill them with deeper joy. For the greater their orphanhood, the more confidently might they rely upon the consolation of the Father of the fatherless.

The orphan condition of the Apostles lasted from the beginning of the passion to the resurrection. It was the type of conditions which are ever recurring in God's dealings with the whole Church and its individual members. When these circumstances occur, it is "our duty to weep with our mother as fatherless, and to lift up our hands to our Father" (Quesnel). Then will the word be fulfilled to us, as it was formerly to the Apostles: I have forsaken thee for a small moment, but with great compassion I will gather thee.

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Hengstenberg, Ernst. "Commentary on John 14:18". Ernst Hengstenberg on John, Revelation, Ecclesiastes, Ezekiel & Psalms. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/heg/john-14.html.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

18.I will not have you orphans. This passage shows what men are, and what they can do, when they have been deprived of the protection of the Spirit. They are orphans, exposed to every kind of fraud and injustice, incapable of governing themselves, and, in short, unable of themselves to do any thing. The only remedy for so great a defect is, if Christ govern us by his Spirit, which he promises that he will do. First then, the disciples are reminded of their weakness, that, distrusting themselves, they may rely on nothing else than the protection of Christ; and, secondly, having promised a remedy, he gives them good encouragement; for he declares that he will never leave them When he says, I will come to you, he shows in what manner he dwells in his people, and in what manner he fills all things. It is, by the power of his Spirit; and hence it is evident, that the grace of the Spirit is a striking proof of his Divinity.

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Calvin, John. "Commentary on John 14:18". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/john-14.html. 1840-57.