corner graphic   Hi,    
ver. 2.0.19.09.22
Finding the new version too difficult to understand? Go to classic.studylight.org/

Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

John 2:15

And He made a scourge of cords, and drove them all out of the temple, with the sheep and the oxen; and He poured out the coins of the money changers and overturned their tables;

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

A scourge - A whip.

Of small cords - This whip was made as an emblem of authority, and also for the purpose of driving from the temple the cattle which had been brought there for sale. There is no evidence that he used any violence to the men engaged in that unhallowed traffic. The original word implies that these “cords” were made of twisted “rushes” or “reeds” - probably the ancient material for making ropes.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.

Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on John 2:15". "Barnes' Notes on the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/john-2.html. 1870.

Coffman's Commentaries on the Bible

And he made a scourge of cords, and cast all out of the temple, both the sheep and the oxen; and he poured out the changers' money, and overthrew their tables.

It is said that Jesus never used force, but this verse proves otherwise. It is a moot question whether or not Jesus actually used a whip on any of the money changers, the usual interpretation being that he did not; but the very existence of such a weapon in the strong hand of the vigorous young carpenter from Nazareth was a threat of force sufficient to deter any of the money-changers from contesting it. The whip was necessary in driving out the animals; but, with regard to the money-changers, the moral indignation of the Holy One crying out against the callous commercialization of the very house of God was far more effective than any physical threat could have been. Needless to say, such action by Jesus was requited by the undying hatred of the godless Sadducees who were the principal operators of the temple concessions. Their financial interests had been jeopardized; and one may be sure that from this day forward murderous schemes were devised for getting rid of Jesus.

This further comment on the meaning of "all" in this verse comes from Hendriksen:

The KJV and RSV favor the idea that Jesus actually drove out all the wicked traffickers together with the sheep and oxen. In the second cleansing of the temple (Matthew 21:12), it is definitely stated that the cattle dealers were themselves driven out. If that happened then, we may take for granted that it took place now.[15]

ENDNOTE:

[15] William Hendriksen, Exposition of the Gospel according to John (Grand Rapids, Michigan: Baker Book House, 1961), p. 123.


Copyright Statement
James Burton Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.

Bibliography
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on John 2:15". "Coffman Commentaries on the Old and New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/john-2.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

And when he had made a scourge of small cords,.... That is, Jesus, as the Persic version expresses it. This scourge might be made either of thongs cut out of the hides of beasts slain in sacrifice; or of the cords, with which the owners of the cattle had brought them to this place; or with which they had fastened them in it. And it seems to be made, and used, not so much for force and terror, as to intimate, that these persons, the violators of the holy place, deserved the scourge of divine wrath and punishment; as well as to show the miraculous power of Christ in driving such a number of men before him, with so small and insignificant a weapon; for the phrase is diminutive. The reason given by Dr. Lightfoot, and others, why Christ made use of a whip, or scourge, rather than a staff, is, because it was contrary to a Jewish canonF4Misn. Beracot, c. 9. sect. 5. to go into the mountain of the house, or temple, with a staff in the hand; and yet the man of the mountain of the house, or the master of it, who used to go about every ward with torches burning before him, if he found a Levite asleep in his wardF5Misn. Middot, c. 1. sect. 2. , struck him במקלו, with his staff, and had power to burn his clothes.

He drove them all out of the temple; that is, he drove out "the men", as the Persic version reads; the merchants, the sellers of oxen, sheep, and doves, and the money changers: "and the sheep, and the oxen" likewise; the Persic version adds, "doves"; but these are after mentioned:

and poured out the changers money; off of the tables, or out of the boxes, or dishes, or drawers, or purses, in which it was put:

and overthrew the tables; at which they sat, and on which they told their money.


Copyright Statement
The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on John 2:15". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/john-2.html. 1999.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

small cords — likely some of the rushes spread for bedding, and when twisted used to tie up the cattle there collected. “Not by this slender whip but by divine majesty was the ejection accomplished, the whip being but a sign of the scourge of divine anger” [Grotius].

poured out … overthrew — thus expressing the mingled indignation and authority of the impulse.


Copyright Statement
These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on John 2:15". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/john-2.html. 1871-8.

People's New Testament

Made a scourge of small cords. Rather as a symbol than for use.

Drove them all out. He had the right to cleanse his Father's house and here first asserts his authority. The traffickers fled before his glance, awed by a superhuman majesty.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
Original work done by Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.

Bibliography
Johnson, Barton W. "Commentary on John 2:15". "People's New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pnt/john-2.html. 1891.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

A scourge of cords (πραγελλιον εκ σχοινιωνphragellion ek schoiniōn). The Latin flagellum. In papyri, here only in N.T. and note Latin l becomes r in Koiné. ρSchoiniōn is a diminutive of Σχοινιωνschoinos (a rush), old word for rope, in N.T. only here and Acts 27:32.

Cast out (σχοινοςexebalen). Second aorist active indicative of εχεβαλενekballō It is not said that Jesus smote the sheep and oxen (note εκβαλλωte kai both and), for a flourish of the scourge would answer.

He poured out
(τε καιexecheen). Second aorist active indicative of εχεχεενekcheō to pour out.

The changers‘ money
(εκχεωtōn kollubistōn ta kermata). “The small pieces of money (των κολλυβιστων τα κερματαkermata cut in pieces, change) of the bankers (κερματαkollubistēs from κολλυβιστηςkollubos clipped, late word see note on Matthew 21:12).” Perhaps he took up the boxes and emptied the money.

Overthrew their tables
(κολλυβοςtas trapezas anetrepsen). First aorist active indicative of τας τραπεζας ανετρεπσενanatrepō to turn up, though some MSS. have ανατρεπωanestrepsen from ανεστρεπσενanastrephō also to turn up.


Copyright Statement
The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)

Bibliography
Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on John 2:15". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/john-2.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Vincent's Word Studies

A scourge ( φραγέλλιον )

Only here in the New Testament. Only John records this detail.

Of small cords ( ἐκ σχοινίων )

The Rev. omits small, but the word is a diminutive of σχοῖνος , a rush, and thence a rope of twisted rushes. The A.V. is therefore strictly literal. Herodotus says that when Croesus besieged Ephesus, the Ephesians made an offering of their city to Diana, by stretching a small rope ( σχοινίον ) from the town wall to the temple of the goddess, a distance of seven furlongs (i., 26). The schoene was an Egyptian measure of length, marked by a rush-rope. See Herodotus, ii. 6. Some find in this the etymology of skein.

Drove out ( ἐξέβαλεν )

Literally, as Rev., cast out. See on Matthew 10:34; see on Matthew 12:35; see on Mark 1:12; see on James 2:25.

All

Referring to the animals. The A.V. makes the reference to the traders; but Rev., correctly, “cast all out - both the sheep and the oxen.”

Money

See on John 2:14.

Tables

Wyc., turned upside down the boards. See on Luke 19:23.


Copyright Statement
The text of this work is public domain.

Bibliography
Vincent, Marvin R. DD. "Commentary on John 2:15". "Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/vnt/john-2.html. Charles Schribner's Sons. New York, USA. 1887.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

And when he had made a scourge of small cords, he drove them all out of the temple, and the sheep, and the oxen; and poured out the changers' money, and overthrew the tables;

Having made a scourge of rushes — (Which were strewed on the ground,) he drove all out of the temple, (that is, the court of it,) both the sheep and the oxen - Though it does not appear that he struck even them; and much less, any of the men. But a terror from God, it is evident, fell upon them.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.

Bibliography
Wesley, John. "Commentary on John 2:15". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/john-2.html. 1765.

The Fourfold Gospel

and he made a scourge of cords, and cast all out of the temple1, both the sheep and the oxen; and he poured out the changers' money, and overthrew their tables2;

  1. And he made a scourge of cords, and cast all out of the temple. The rest of the verse shows that "all" does not refer to men, but to sheep and oxen. The scourge was used in driving them out.

  2. And he poured out the changers' money, and overthrew their tables. The Jews were each required to pay, for the support of the temple service, one half-shekel annually (Exodus 30:13; Matthew 17:24). These money- changers sat at small tables, on which their coins were piled and counted.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website. These files were made available by Mr. Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.

Bibliography
J. W. McGarvey and Philip Y. Pendleton. "Commentary on John 2:15". "The Fourfold Gospel". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tfg/john-2.html. Standard Publishing Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 1914.

Abbott's Illustrated New Testament

A scourge of small cords; as an emblem, not an instrument, of authority. Such a scourge, as a weapon of offence against numbers, would be useless; so that the buyers and sellers are to be understood as yielding, not to force, but to the authority which Jesus assumed as a prophet--an authority always held by the Jews in the highest veneration.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.

Bibliography
Abbott, John S. C. & Abbott, Jacob. "Commentary on John 2:15". "Abbott's Illustrated New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ain/john-2.html. 1878.

Ver. 15. "And having made a small scourge of cords, he drove them all out of the temple, both the sheep and the oxen; and he poured out the changers" money and overthrew their tables."

This scourge was not an instrument, but an emblem. It was the sign of authority and of judgment. If it had been a matter of performing a physical act, the means would have been disproportionate to the end, and the effect would be even more so to the cause. The material use of the scourge had no place. The simple gesture was enough.— πάντας, all, includes, according to many (comp. Baumlein, Weiss, Keil), only the two following objects connected by τε καί, "all, bothsheep and oxen." But it is more natural to refer πάντας to τοὺς πωλοῦντας, the sellers, which precedes, and to make of the following words a simple apposition: "He drove them all out, both sheep and oxen." The design of the τε καί, as well as, is certainly not to indicate by a lifeless disjoining of parts the contents of the word all, but to express the sort of bustle with which men and animals hastened off at His command and at the gesture which accompanied it. He overturned, with His own hand.— κολλυβιστής, money-changer, from κόλλυβος, nummus minutus.τὸ κέρμα, singular taken in the collective sense.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Godet, Frédéric Louis. "Commentary on John 2:15". "Frédéric Louis Godet - Commentary on Selected Books". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsc/john-2.html.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

15 And when he had made a scourge of small cords, he drove them all out of the temple, and the sheep, and the oxen; and poured out the changers’ money, and overthrew the tables;

Ver. 15. And when he had made a scourge] Here he put forth a beam of his Deity; while, as another Samson, he lays heaps upon heaps (yet without bloodshed) with the jaw bone of an ass. Zeal is attended by revenge, 2 Corinthians 7:11.

The changers’ money] Gr. small money, κερμα παρα το κειρειν, in minuta frusta concidere.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on John 2:15". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/john-2.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

John 2:15. A scourge of small cords, It has been very justly observed, that this circumstance, seemingly slight, is inserted to shew that the instrument could not have been the cause of so wonderful an effect.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on John 2:15". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/john-2.html. 1801-1803.

Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary

15.] The σχοινία were probably the rushes which were littered down for the cattle to lie on. That our Lord used the scourge on the beasts only, not on the sellers of them, is almost necessarily contained in the form of the sentence here: the τά τε πρόβατα κ. τ. βόας being as it stands with τε and καί, merely epexegetical of πάντας, not conveying new particulars. So that it should be rendered as in A.V.R., “He drove all out of the temple, both the sheep and the oxen.” ( ἐξέχεεν is the aor., not the resolved form of the imperfect: cf. Aristoph. Nub. 75, and see Lobeck’s note on Phryn. p. 222.) It has been imagined, that He dealt more mildly with those who sold the doves, which were for the offerings of the poor. But this was not so: He dealt alike with all. No other way was open with regard to them, than to order them to take their birds away.

This cleansing of the temple was in the direct course of His manifestation as the Messiah. Immediately after the prophetic announcement of the Forerunner, Malachi 3:1, is that of the Lord’s coming suddenly to His temple, and purifying it. This act also answers (but like the fulfilment last mentioned, only in an imperfect and still prophetic sense) to the declaration of the Baptist “Whose fan is in His hand,” &c., Matthew 3:12.

His proceeding was not altogether unexampled nor unauthorized, even in an uncommissioned person: for all had the right to reform an abuse of this sort, and the zealots put this right in practice. The disciples by their allusion in John 2:17 seem to refer the action to this latter class.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Alford, Henry. "Commentary on John 2:15". Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hac/john-2.html. 1863-1878.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

John 2:15. φραγέλλιον, a scourge) Admirable zeal!— ἐκ σχοινίων) of several cords: for so scourges were formerly made. Moreover there was no material which inflicted less lasting hurt on the body than this. Nor is it said, that He inflicted a single blow upon the men: He accomplished His purpose by the terror [which He inspired].


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on John 2:15". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/john-2.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

It concerns not us to inquire where our Saviour had the small cords, of which he made his whip; there were doubtless cords enough at hand, taken off from beasts brought thither, though he was himself in no Franciscan habit, as the papists idly dream. But herein was the mighty power of God seen, that Christ, a single, private, obscure person, should without any more noise or opposition drive out the multitude of these hucksters, and overturn their tables. Nor I think (after the consideration of this circumstance) need we inquire by what authority he did this? It was prophesied of him, Malachi 3:1, that he should come to his temple; Malachi 3:3, should sit as a refiner and purifier of silver; and purify the sons of Levi, and purge them as gold and silver. Christ here, according to that prophecy, cometh to his temple, and begins to purge it.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on John 2:15". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/john-2.html. 1685.

Cambridge Greek Testament for Schools and Colleges

15. ποιήσας φρ. Peculiar to this account: there is no such incident in the cleansing recorded by the Synoptists. The scourge was probably not used; to raise it would be enough. Σχοινίων are literally twisted rushes.

τά τε πρόβ. κ.τ.β. Both the sheep and the oxen, explanatory of πάντας, which does not refer to the sellers and exchangers, who probably fled at once: comp. Matthew 22:10. The order is natural; first the driving out the cattle, then the pouring out the money and overturning the tables.

κολλυβιστῶν. From κόλλυβφς = ‘rate of exchange’ (Cic. Verr. II. iii. 78; Att. XII. vi. 1); this was very high, 10 or 12 per cent. Payments to the Temple were always made in Jewish coin, to avoid profanation by money stamped with idolatrous symbols.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
"Commentary on John 2:15". "Cambridge Greek Testament for Schools and Colleges". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cgt/john-2.html. 1896.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

15. Scourge—Not mentioned in the second cleansing.

Drove them Striking the cattle with the scourge; giving the doves to their owners; and terrifying and driving the men from the court; dealing with each class according to its nature. Meantime the rulers of the nation and the keepers of the temple, as if spell-bound and dumb-struck, retreat in confusion, or look on with a strange and tame submission.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on John 2:15". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/john-2.html. 1874-1909.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

John 2:15. And making a scourge of cords, he drove them all out of the temple-courts, and the sheep and the oxen. The scourge was made for the expulsion of the animals, but by it Jesus also declared His purpose to the traders themselves. The words show distinctly that it is with the men that He is dealing; but He drives them from the sacred place by banishing the instruments and means of their unholy traffic. In a figurative sense Messiah was said to come armed with a scourge. ‘Rabbi Eliezer was asked by his disciples: How should a man live to escape the scourge of the Messiah? He answered: Let him live according to the law and in love towards men.’

And poured out the changers’ money, and overthrew the tables-the counters on which the bankers placed their heaps of change.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on John 2:15". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/john-2.html. 1879-90.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

He drove them all out of the temple. According to St. John Chrysostom (hom. lxvii. in Matt.) this casting out was different from that which is there related, chap. xxi. ver. 12. (Witham) --- How could the Son of the carpenter, Joseph, whose divinity was yet unknown to the people, succeed in expelling so great a multitude from the temple! There was undoubtedly something divine in his whole conduct and appearance, which deterred all from making resistance. The evangelist seems to insinuate this by putting these words: "The house of my Father," into our Saviour's mouth, which was making himself immediately the Son of God. This made Origen consider this miracle, in overcoming the unruly dispositions of so many, as a superior manifestation of power to what he had shewn in changing the nature of water at Cana. (Haydock) --- Jesus Christ here shews the respect he requires should be shewn to the temple of God; and St. Paul, speaking of the profaners of God's Church, saith: If any man defile the temple of God, he will God destroy. (1 Corinthians iii. 17.) Which in a spiritual sense may be understood of the soul of man, which is the living temple of the living God. (Haydock)


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on John 2:15". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/john-2.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

made a scourge = plaited a whip. Occurs only here.

of = from. Greek. ek. App-104. Not the same word as in verses: John 21:25.

small cords = rush-ropes. Greek. schoinion. Only here and in Acts 27:32.

drove . . . out = cast out. Not the same event as in Matthew 21:12, Matthew 21:13. Mark 11:15, Mark 11:16. Luke 19:45, Luke 19:46.

them all = all: i.e. the animals, both the sheep and the oxen and the sellers.

and = both,

changers. Greek. kollubistes (from kollubes, a small coin). Occurs only here.

money = small coin. Greek. Plural of kerma. Occurs only here.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on John 2:15". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/john-2.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

And when he had made a scourge of small cords, he drove them all out of the temple, and the sheep, and the oxen; and poured out the changers' money, and overthrew the tables;

And when he had made a scourge , [ fragellion (Greek #5416) = flagellum] of small cords - likely some of the rushes spread for bedding, and when twisted used to tie up the cattle there collected. 'Not by this slender whip,' says Grotius admirably, 'but by divine majesty was the ejection accomplished, the whip being but a sign of the scourge of divine anger.'

He drove them all out of the temple, and the sheep, and the oxen , [pantas ... ta (Greek #3588) te (Greek #5037) probata (Greek #4263) kai (Greek #2532) tous (Greek #3588) boas (Greek #1016)] - rather, 'drove out all, both the sheep and the oxen.' The men would naturally enough go with them. And poured out the changers' money, and overthrew the tables - expressing the mingled indignation and authority of the impulse.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on John 2:15". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/john-2.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(15) And the sheep, and the oxen.—For this read, both the sheep and the oxen. The change is of only one word, but it gives an entirely different sense. The driving out with the scourge was not of “all (men) and sheep and oxen,” but of “all,” i.e., both sheep and oxen.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on John 2:15". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/john-2.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

And when he had made a scourge of small cords, he drove them all out of the temple, and the sheep, and the oxen; and poured out the changers' money, and overthrew the tables;
he drove
18:6; Zechariah 4:6; 2 Corinthians 10:4

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on John 2:15". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/john-2.html.

The Bible Study New Testament

He made a whip from cords. Notice he used it on the animals. The whip was mostly symbolic. This is the first time he demonstrated his authority.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.

Bibliography
Ice, Rhoderick D. "Commentary on John 2:15". "The Bible Study New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ice/john-2.html. College Press, Joplin, MO. 1974.

Ver. 15. "And when He had made a scourge of small cords, He drove them all out of the temple, and the sheep, and the oxen; and poured out the changers money, and overthrew the tables."—"It is to mock God," says Quesnel, "when men come to commit new sins at the very place where they are to bewail and expiate their old ones." The cords for the scourge, Jesus doubtless took from the sellers. It is not mentioned that He struck them with the scourge, nor was this necessary. It was a symbol only of the castigation which the practice merited, the embodied ἐξέβαλεν. The sheep are placed first intentionally, in order that the masculine πάντας; may be referred to the persons. That by "all" is meant those who are mentioned first in ver. 14 , is shown by the additional clause, "and the sheep and the oxen." If πάντας does not refer to these persons, then nothing is said of the sellers, with whom, however, Jesus had chiefly to do. The Berleburger Bibel remarks on the words, He drove them all out of the temple, "As He does inwardly also; for everything foreign must give way on His entrance into the heart." That the expulsion of the sellers was not a proper miracle, is evident from ver. 18 , in which the Jews demand that Jesus should justify His action by a miracle. In explanation of the effect, we must consider that Jesus had a powerful confederate in the consciences of the offenders—an evil conscience makes men cowards; that the privilege of the prophets was acknowledged among the people, and had been sanctioned by illustrious examples in the past, as that of Elijah; and that at this time the people were filled with a presentiment of a great impending reformation and overthrow of existing relations. But we must, above all, take into account the majesty of the person of Jesus, whose countenance then certainly shone like the sun, and His eyes were as a flame of fire. We have a parallel instance in John 18:6, where it is said of the priestly myrmidons, ἀπῆλθον εἰς τὰ ὀπίσω καὶ ἔπεσαν χαμαί.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Hengstenberg, Ernst. "Commentary on John 2:15". Ernst Hengstenberg on John, Revelation, Ecclesiastes, Ezekiel & Psalms. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/heg/john-2.html.

Lectionary Calendar
Sunday, September 22nd, 2019
the Week of Proper 20 / Ordinary 25
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
To report dead links, typos, or html errors or suggestions about making these resources more useful use our convenient contact form
Powered by Lightspeed Technology